Tag: Shaq


Pat Riley laughs off Shaq’s “Gestapo” comment


Pat Riley understands Shaquille O’Neal.

Understood he needed to push the big man hard if the Heat were going to win the championship in 2006. Understands him now as Shaq goes around promoting his “Shaq Uncut” biography.

That’s why Riley was not offended by Shaq saying talking about Riley’s “Gestapo conditioning,” as the coach told Ira Winderman at the Sun Sentinel.

“He’s marketing. He’s a marketer. He’s just marketing right now,” Riley told the Sun Sentinel with a dismissive laugh. “That’s all he’s doing….”

“I’m trying to figure out whether or not Hannibal Lecter, the Gestapo or John Gotti, I don’t know which one is worse,” Riley said of the characterizations he’s received from O’Neal over the years. “They’re all equally insulting.”

He smiled, then paused, “but Coach is good enough for me.”

Shaq is about selling books. Well, Shaq is about selling the Shaq persona, right now that is books. Someday (soon I hope) it will be selling Shaq the TNT analyst. There will other Shaqs to sell after that.

Riley gets that. We all should get that.

Shaq turned away from NYC club because he dressed down

Basketball star Shaquille O'Neal of the

Shaquille O’Neal may be an NBA legend, a television personality, social media star and now published author, it doesn’t matter. For some New York clubs you don’t dress up, you don’t get in. Period.

Here is the report from TMZ — who else did you think would have this story? (Hat tip to Eye on Basketball.)

TMZ has learned … Shaq rolled up to nightclub/restaurant Mars 2112 on Saturday night wearing jeans, a sweatshirt, tennis shoes and a beanie… But according to the club promoter, Mike Mogul, Shaq’s attire wasn’t up to club standards … so security politely informed the retired NBA star that he would not be allowed inside.

Sources at the club tell us Shaq calmly replied, “Are you serious?” … then shrugged his shoulders and walked down the street to another place that welcomed The Diesel with open arms.

I’m no club promoter or expert on New York nightlife, but you know what might help create a buzz about your club more than a strict dress code? Having Shaquille O’Neal seen in your club, and him tweeting about it. No matter what he was wearing.

The guy I feel bad for is the security guard, who is used to being the biggest guy on the block, having to walk up to Shaq, look up six to eight inches (giving up a hundred pounds) and deliver the news.

Please… end the lockout. I’d like to start writing about basketball again.

Shaq compares LeBron, Wade in clutch; smacks Bosh

Washington Wizards v Miami Heat

It’s Tuesday, time for another installment of “Shaquille O’Neal smacks someone is his book.”

Chris Bosh, come on down, you’re the next contestant.

Here is what Shaq wrote about the third wheel of the Miami Heat, as reported by Ethan Skolnick in the Palm Beach Post (via I am a GM).

“Some guys come into the league without a ton of props, so there’s not a whole lot of pressure on them. Then they sign a big deal and all of a sudden they’re thrown into the spotlight. Chris Bosh is like that. He’s getting all this attention, so he starts believing he’s really good. C’mon now. We know better. He’s a player who can put up some numbers, but he’s not an elite player. He was in Toronto eight years and they were never a factor, never a playoff team. Don’t get with those other two guys and start pounding your chest. I ain’t buying it, and I’m not the only one.”

Shaq also has an interesting way of looking at the Heat and who takes the last shot.

“People ask me all the time: If you had to choose between DWade and LeBron, which would you take? Which one would you make the CEO? It’s really a tough question. LeBron is a better decision maker. DWade will hit more last-second shots. Lots of superstars in their position want and need to take the last shot. LeBron is more of an ‘opportunity’ CEO. He’s not afraid to take the last shot, but he won’t hesitate to pass it to an open Mike Miller either. So where do these two guys measure up against Kobe? Kobe is a scientific dawg. He works out every day, practices every day. Most of the other stars are just dawgs, not scientific dawgs. Me, I’m a freak-of-nature dawg because of my size. LeBron could be a scientific dawg like Kobe, but he’s got a lot going on like I did, so that’s preventing him from being one.”

I’m fairly sure that is the most use of the word “dawg” in a paragraph in the history of American literature. Well, at least until Randy Jackson writes a biography.

Author: Shaquille O’Neal’s father abused him as a child

Former US basketball star Shaquille O'Ne

Through all the entertaining anecdotes in the new Shaquille O’Neal book about his clashes with Kobe Bryant (and Pat Riley and LeBron James and Big Baby and…) there is another, darker episode.

There is Shaq’s upbringing, and how his father physically and mentally abused him. Like punching him in the face out of the blue abusive.

Phillip Harrison, Shaq’s military-member father, crossed the line from raising a tough child to abuse, according to Jackie MacMullan, who wrote the book with Shaq. And he crossed it a lot, she said.

Here is what MacMullan told Jason Whitlock on a FoxSports.com podcast (transcribed by Eye on Basketball).

“It gets lost in the shuffle because people want to talk about Kobe, Pat Riley, and LeBron and all these other famous people, but another fascinating part of this book is his father. ‘Sarge,’ Phillip Harrison, who, frankly, abused him all the way through his life. Physically abused him, beat the living daylights out of him at every turn…

“We’re not talking about spanking. We’re talking about a belt. Beating him badly. Something that disturbed his mother greatly. Of course, Shaq’s mom and his dad aren’t together any more. I think that’s in part why. Sarge was a military guy, that’s how his father raised him, and that’s how he was going to raise his son. I don’t think he thinks there’s anything wrong with it still. Shaq understands it, his dad was ‘trying to help’ him. He believed his dad had the best intentions, so Shaq gives him a pass on it. As a reader, you can’t help but go, ‘Wow, this is tough, this is over the top.’….

“His father came home from work one night, Shaq is sitting there, he punches Shaq in the face. Shaq says, ‘Well, what’s that for?’ [Harrison] said, ‘We’re going to see this guy play basketball. We’re going to see him play tonight. He plays in the NBA. You’re messing around, you’re goofing around, you’re not serious about your game. This guy makes $15 million and he can’t play at all. And we’re going to go see him.’ Punches him again and takes him to go see Jon Koncak play basketball and says, ‘See, if you applied yourself, you could be in the NBA making $15 million.’ You can say that’s a good story, it makes my skin go pale, and I’m pretty pale to begin with.”

As a father, it makes me angry. I get how challenging it can be to motivate children, I get how hard it can be to get them to listen, be structured and follow rules. They’re kids, they want to push you at every turn. But there is a line that cannot be crossed. Not in a civil society.

It should be noted that Shaq says his father made him the man he became and Shaq loves his father dearly. Shaq praises his dad throughout the book.

Shaq also said in the book he would never treat his own kids the same way. Let’s hope that is true. Let’s hope he has ended the cycle of abuse. If so, he deserves a lot of credit.

Kareem says Shaq didn’t get help because he didn’t ask

Los Angeles Lakers

Among the seemingly countless interesting bits coming out of Shaquille O’Neal’s new book — hitting stores next week, if you still buy your books in stores — were some swipes at Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

Shaq said that Kareem offered him no help through his NBA career. Which seems believable because Kareem is a bit standoffish.

But Kareem responded on his Facebook page (via the Los Angeles Times) that Shaq didn’t ask for advice and didn’t take it the one time it was given.

“As a pro I never approached Shaq because I thought he was pretty successful dunking everything and I assumed he didn’t want my help,” Abdul-Jabbar said. “Additionally, I was never on the coaching staff of any of his teams. I was never unfriendly to him and I would talk to him, but Shaq was enjoying his success, doing it his way. He never asked me of what I thought he should be doing and he never tried to reach out to me for any instruction and I respected that decision.”

“If I had any idea that Shaq wanted to learn from me, I would have been happy to have worked with him, but all indications that I had received was that he felt he was doing fine and he didn’t need or want my help,” Abdul-Jabbar said. “I am totally surprised by Shaq’s comments as I tried to respect his privacy and never got any indication from anyone that he wanted or needed any input from me with regard to how he played the game. Shaq had a great career, and I, like everyone else, respect what he has achieved.”

Shaq’s dad is right — he didn’t really need the skyhook. People dismissed Shaq as a guy who could just dunk, but as our own John Krolik likes to point out the goal of an offensive player is to create a high-quality shot for himself (or a teammate) and they don’t get much more high quality than a dunk. If Shaq could power his way to the hoop for a dunk, he should.

But Kareem was more than one shot. Kareem came with tremendous footwork, passing skills, great court awareness, a very high IQ for the game. There were a lot of things he could have passed along.

But their personalities never really let that happen.