Tag: Shane Battier

Josh Smith, Paul Pierce, flop

D-League to start calling technical for flopping in game, see if that works


The D-League is where the NBA likes to try out rule changes first to see how they work. For example, this season the D-League uses quicker timeouts and is using the international goaltending rule (once the ball hits the rim it is live and can be knocked off).

Now the D-League is going to try handing out in-game technical for flopping in an effort to slow a trend the NBA finds embarrassing. They will start trying it out on Feb. 20, the league announced.

Right now referees can call a personal foul for flopping, but that is rare. To be clear, they are defining flopping as “any physical act that appears to have been intended to cause the referee to call a foul on another player.”

Referees will be told to call a flopping technical more aggressively, but then will have to go to the instant replay monitors to confirm the call (not at that moment but at the next time out or quarter break). The foul shot with the technical would be taken after that confirmation.

The NBA needs to try something because the slap on the wrist fines currently assessed — just a warning the first time, a $5,000 fine the second and escalating from there — simply isn’t working.

Players flop, they embellish contact because it works — they do get foul calls and the penalty is not a deterrent. Maybe these in game penalties would help, but if they are sometimes getting the calls they want in game for flopping they likely will risk the technical to continue.

Personally, I’m with Shane Battier on this — if you want to do away with flopping, make the fine $25,000 for the first offense and have it escalate fast. Make it hurt in the wallet and guys are more likely to stop.

But we’ll try technical in the D-League first, I guess.

Highlights of Miami Heat’s “Battioke” event. Chris Bosh is the best.

Miami Heat player Chris Bosh speaks to the media before a team practice ahead of Game 2 of the NBA Finals basketball playoff against the San Antonio Spurs in Miami

That is Chris Bosh singing Tom Jones’ “It’s not unusual” while breaking out the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Carlton Dance. That is why Chris Bosh is awesome (that and he’s a better basketball player than most of you seem to give him credit for, but that’s another post for another day).

It’s may favorite thing from “Battioke” — Shane Battier’s annual charity fundraiser where the Miami Heat get up and sing. And they all sing — LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Greg Oden… just everyone.

Here are a few other highlights, such as Bosh doing “The Humpty Dance” (by Digital Underground, in case you forgot).

Greg Oden, Shane Battier and Ken Jeong performing the Backstreet Boys’ “I Want It That Way.”

LeBron breaks out the falsetto on “Blurred Lines” with Wade and Udonis Haslem (I’m still partial to the video with virtually naked supermodels, for some reason).

Pat Riley got Jimmy Buffett on stage to do Marvin Gaye’s “Heard it through the Grapevine.”

D-Wade’s wife Gabrielle Union went country with Garth Brooks’ “Friends in Low Places.”

The event closed with ‘Lil Jon’s “Get Low.”

Shane Battier memorializes grandmother with ‘Battle’ nickname jersey

San Antonio Spurs vs Miami Heat

Shane Battier doesn’t have a  well-established nickname, though I guess “Batman” comes closest. So, when Battier learned the Miami Heat would wear nickname jerseys a few times this season, he was stuck. Tim Reynolds of the Associated Press:

Miami forward Shane Battier – who wasn’t exactly thrilled about the nickname idea – said he wanted to wear ”Batman” on his jersey, though was told that Warner Brothers holds the rights to that name, and other players have also had to deal with copyright-related issues with their suggested monikers. Battier said he’ll go with ”Shaneo” instead.

Thankfully, instead of pushing “Shaneo” into our lexicon, Battier found a better idea, wearing “Battle” on the back of his jersey. Phil Latzman of 90.9 wbur Boston:

“I’m using this opportunity for the nickname jersey to pay a tribute to a great lady, who passed away and touched a lot of people,” Heat forward Shane Battier said. “It’s my way of saying, ‘I love you grandma.’”

Battier’s  grandmother Mary Battle died last year.

“It’s a once-in-a-lifetime thing, to pay homage to my family, and to see them fired up and care so much about something that is trivial to most of the guys,” Battier said. “It’s kind of cool.”

A few years ago, Battier explained why his paternal grandmother had a slightly different last name than he did. Bad hand-writing.

I don’t think “Battle” will stick as Battier’s nickname. He’s a tough player, but his style isn’t quite physical enough to match the traditional meaning of the word.

But for a few times this season, it’s a perfect name to go on the back of his jersey.

LeBron admits quest for three-peat wearing down Heat

Miami Heat v Brooklyn Nets

“There’s a reason these teams don’t do it. Emotionally, it’s just exhausting to keep doing it year after year, particularly when you have to deal with everything Miami has to deal with on a daily basis, just the constant critiquing and scrutiny on the team, and then you factor in the injuries with Wade and Bosh and their health.”
—TNT analyst Steve Kerr, who was a three-peat champion with the Chicago Bulls, predicting before the season the Heat would not three-peat.


Every night if you are the defending champion you get the other team’s best shot — the last two nights that happened to the Heat in two different boroughs of New York and the Heat were not up for it. They lost both games, to the Knicks and Nets, another example of the Heat’s lapses we have seen for a couple regular seasons where they don’t bring their best game nightly (although they woke up at the end against the Nets certainly).

After the game LeBron James admitted that the grind is mentally wearing the Miami Heat down, something reported by Ken Berger at CBSSports.com.

“It’s a long and grueling season for all of us, not just us because we’re the champs,” James said after fouling out for only the sixth time in his career and the first time in a regular season game since 2008. “We’ve played a lot of basketball in our four years together. It’s taken a lot of wear and tear on all our bodies. It’s mentally fatiguing. And you just try to find the motivation the best way you can as an individual and as a collective group…

“We’re banged up right now,” James said. “We’re not an excuse team right now, but we’ve got three starters [out]. And even though we’ve got a lot of depth, it’s hard to make up for three starters being out, so we could all use a break for sure.”

Dwyane Wade, Mario Chalmers and Shane Battier were out injured against the Nets, the kind of nagging ones the Heat like to treat with rest during the season.

The motivation will be there come the playoffs, and despite lapses like this there remains only one team in the East who realistically stands a chance against a healthy Heat team in a seven game series (Indiana).

But Jeff Van Gundy harped on the key point of those lapses during the Friday night broadcast — is Miami building the good habit during the regular season that they will need come the playoffs? There were questions about that last season but they were able to knock off a Spurs team that certainly did execute. Those issues seem larger this season, however.

Indiana is bringing the nightly focus of a contender this season, looking like an elite team regardless of circumstance. Miami, despite having a better record than at this point last season, does look tired. And that can do things like swing the last couple games of an otherwise tight seven game series.

Spoelstra says Heat won’t base injury decisions on experience of other teams

Phoenix Suns v Miami Heat

NEW YORK — The Miami Heat weren’t at full strength during Thursday’s loss to the Knicks, and a day later in Brooklyn the team found out before tip-off that it would be even more shorthanded against the streaking Nets.

Shane Battier and Mario Chalmers both sat against the Knicks, and will do so again in Brooklyn. After Dwyane Wade logged 39 minutes against New York, he said before the game that the pain in his knees was too much for him to play against the Nets.

That’s three of Miami’s five starters that will be out against a Nets team that has won four straight while dealing with plenty of injury issues of their own. But Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra has said more than once that Wade will be essentially day-to-day all year long, in order to preserve his knees for another extended campaign that he hopes will end in a fourth straight trip to the NBA Finals.

“That’s just the way it has to be,” Spoelstra said of Wade’s ongoing, gametime decision status. “We’ve put together a very disciplined structured routine where we evaluate him every single day. If he feels good and passes the tests — a very specific evaluation — then he can play. If he can’t, then he doesn’t.”

With what seems like an epidemic of injuries to key players ongoing this season, most recently with Eric Bledsoe and Jrue Holiday going down for extended periods of time, it may be tempting to be even more cautious than usual. But Spoelstra said any decisions made in Miami are independent of what the league as a whole may be experiencing.

“For us, we’re not looking across the league and making our decisions based on that,” he said. “You cringe, certainly, when you see a player get hurt. And the news we just heard about the last two players that got hurt, you know, it’s horrible. You feel for them and their teams.

“With us, we want to make sure that we’re taking care of it so you don’t have a setback. In particular with Shane and Rio, that’s what you don’t want. So even if you take another few days longer than they think they might need, if you don’t have a setback, then everything’s great. A setback, and then it’s another two weeks — that starts to add up, and now you’re really playing from behind. We just want to be smart about it.”

Managing the process is obviously important, and sitting Wade on one night of a back-to-back set for the fifth time this season, even when coming off of a loss in which the team didn’t play particularly well, is a great example of that. But you can only realistically prepare for so much.

“Ultimately there’s an incredible unpredictability about it,” Spoelstra said. “All you can do is knock on wood, cross your fingers.”