Tag: Shane Battier

Brooklyn Nets v Miami Heat - Game 5

Report: After Finals and retirement, Shane Battier to become ESPN College basketball analyst


Was there anyone who didn’t think Shane Battier was going to go into broadcasting after his NBA career ended? Well, outside the Michigan Democratic Party?

Battier will become an ESPN College basketball analyst after the season, reports The Big Lead. Battier has said repeatedly this will be his last season, but you can’t expect him or anyone else to talk about this right now as he’s still a tad busy right now with the Miami Heat as they prepare for a rematch with the San Antonio Spurs.

Shane Battier, who said two months ago that he would be retiring after this NBA season barring an “act of God,” has agreed to a multi-year TV deal with ESPN to be a college basketball analyst next season, multiple sources have told The Big Lead.

It’s unclear yet if ESPN will use Battier, 35, as a game analyst, in the studio, or on the set of College Gameday, which is being revamped.

He’d be good in any format.

Battier spent four years at Duke and was the 2001 AP Player of the Year and John Wooden Award winner. He was a two-time All-American at Duke before being the No. 6 pick of the Memphis Grizzlies that year.

Battier has had a 13-year NBA career, was twice named to the NBA All-Defensive Second Team (2008 and 2009 when he was in Houston) and he has been a “3 and D” specialist for the Miami Heat during their two title runs.

He’s also a go-to guy for media members looking for a good quote — he’s thoughtful and is fantastic at expressing the details of the game in a way that’s not just coach speak (or management speak). He will be great for ESPN.

Once he finishes his day job.

Shane Battier says Michigan Democratic Party asked him about running for U.S. Senate

Brooklyn Nets v Miami Heat - Game 5

Shane Battier has been fairly effective in the playoffs – only because the Heat have been very careful about when an how to use him.

Battier barely played against the Bobcats, had a larger role against the smaller Nets and chose his spots wisely against the Pacers.

At 35, Battier is facing the end of his career. He might win another championship this year. He might even play another season or two.

But the end is in sight.

So, what’s next?

Zach Lowe of Grantland:

The Michigan Democratic Party recently called him to see if he might consider running to replace U.S. Senator Carl Levin, Battier said. He declined

There is likely a wide gap between getting asked asked to consider running and getting asked to run. I would be surprised if the Michigan Democratic Party didn’t inquire with several potential candidates to replace Levin, who announced he was retiring after six terms.

But it’s telling that Battier was even on the radar.

He’s the current Teammate of the Year, and he frequently pops up in surveys about which current player would make the best coach or general manager. If he wants a future in basketball, he has one.

He could aim wider, though.

Battier, who grew up in Michigan before attending Duke, is still widely respected in his home state. He might not be viewed as a politician right now, but his name recognition will open doors if he wants to pursue that route.

Whatever Battier wants to do after retiring, he’s capable of making it happen.

Shane Battier wins NBA Teammate of the Year award

Brooklyn Nets v Miami Heat - Game 5

This award has meaning for the players because it is voted on by their peers — NBA players vote on the teammate award.

They chose Miami’s Shane Battier.

He won the second Twyman-Stokes Teammate of the Year award.

The 13-year NBA veteran is a guy Miami Heat coach Eric Spoelstra called “the ultimate teammate.” Battier plays a shifting role with Miami, but does stays ready, doesn’t complain and helps talk teammates through what he sees and where they can attack and make plays. You’d be hard pressed to find someone better liked in a locker room.

“It is a huge honor. It’s probably one of the biggest honors of my life. It means a lot to me, I’ve tried to be a good teammate my entire life,” Battier said, as reported by the Heat.

It’s a fitting tribute to Battier, in what likely is his last NBA season.

The award is named after Jack Twyman and Maurice Stokes, who were friends and teammates on the Rochester/Cincinnati Royals from 1955 to 1958. At the end of the 1958 season, Stokes suffered an on-court head injury severe enough to send him into a coma for days. He awoke paralyzed and suffer post-traumatic encephalopathy, a brain injury that damaged his motor-control center. For the rest of his life Twyman took care of Stokes, cared for him and became his legal guardian.

Battier is only the second winner of this award, the inaugural one went to Chauncey Billups. Players vote for one of a dozen players chosen by a list of retired NBA players.

Here is a breakdown of the voting (with first place votes, total points):

Shane Battier, Miami (67) , 1,322
Al Jefferson, Charlotte (29), 798
Dirk Nowitzki, Dallas (28), 784
Chris Paul, L.A. Clippers (40), 754
Pau Gasol, L.A. Lakers (36), 753
Manu Ginobili, San Antonio (14), 739
Channing Frye, Phoenix (24), 568
Andre Iguodala, Golden State (19), 552
Jameer Nelson, Orlando (16), 546
Elton Brand, Atlanta (11), 452
David West, Indiana (16), 447
Mike Dunleavy, Chicago (10), 345

LeBron James and Dwyane Wade need each other now more than ever

Dwyane Wade, LeBron James

When LeBron James stole the ball, three Pacers were closer to the Indiana basket than Dwyane Wade.

LeBron – arguably the greatest athlete in NBA history – took off in the open court, using his unique blend of speed and power to create space for a layup.

Wade – 32 years old and battling perpetual knee injuries that would make you think he’s 37 – ran just as hard.

It paid off. LeBron missed his shot, and Wade followed with a putback dunk.

“Usually, D Wade don’t even chase me down. He know if it’s a one-on-one matchup with me, most of the time I’m going to score,” LeBron said smiling. “But I was glad that he did.”

That was part of a decisive 10-0 run that propelled the Heat to an 87-83 win over the Pacers in Game 2 Tuesday. LeBron or Wade scored or assisted Miami’s final 33 points, including scoring the final 20 themselves.

“That’s what we want,” Wade said. “We came here, and that’s what we envisioned – having two guys that is able to be dynamic at the same time.”

Neither LeBron nor Wade are playing their best right now, which is precisely why they must lean on each other. The Heat aren’t playing their best either, making them especially reliant on their biggest stars, and there’s only one way LeBron and Wade can meet that dependence – together.

In the final 16 minutes – a full third of the game – LeBron (14 of 22 points) and Wade (10 of 23 points) absolutely dominated. They had to. Here was the production in that span of Miami’s other three starters:

  • Chris Bosh: three points,  one rebound, one block, one steal
  • Mario Chalmers: did not play
  • Udonis Haslem: did not play

Erik Spoelstra changed his starting lineup from Game 1, inserting Haslem for Shane Battier, but the the switch didn’t really pay dividends. Haslem proved ineffective against Roy Hibbert and didn’t help enough on the glass. Credit the Heat coach for having the guts to bench Haslem and Chalmers, who didn’t provide the spark Norris Cole did.

Meanwhile, Bosh is not producing while battling Indiana’s behemoths. He has just 18 points on 8-of-21 shooting and eight rebounds in the series.

Chris Andersen came off the bench to grab 12 rebounds and produce a stunning +25 plus-minus in a four-point game, but he’s just one of several Miami role players. the Heat can’t rely on a single one of them on a nightly basis.

As the Heat have aged, their talent gap over the rest of the league has shrunk. The Pacers are absolutely good enough to win this series, and there are several Western Conference teams – including both still playing – capable of beating Miami, too.

That leaves a lot on the plates of LeBron and Wade.

The four-year examination of how LeBron and Wade fit together has been overblown. Let’s get that out of the way. LeBron and Wade are both tremendously skilled and versatile players. They fit with everyone.

But LeBron and Wade aren’t a perfect fit together. There’s give and take with two players used to dominating the ball, and a surprisingly low number of Heat plays this far into their current incarnation use both in key spots simultaneously.

That said, they’re better off together than they would be separately with lesser, better-fitting teammates. Their talent outweighs fit concerns.

LeBron once again played passively early and averaged a touch just once every 44 seconds – narrowly topping a season high set yesterday. His defense was also lacking, even though Paul George shot poorly.

Enter Wade.

Wade took the ball and also guarded George late, freeing the burden from LeBron. In Game 3, nobody would be shocked to see LeBron help Wade.

LeBron and Wade pick each other up, and despite some unavoidable fit issues, they’re trying to jell even more.

“Obviously, I always know where No. 6 is on the floor,” Wade said. “And he knows where I am on the floor.”

That includes Wade’s putback slam. Wade admitted “99.9 percent of the time,” he’d hang back as LeBron surged in the open court. But Wade was perceptive to a LeBron flaw.

“I actually noticed he didn’t really get the acceleration that he needed,” Wade said. “He took a step, and he didn’t get up. So, that allowed me to just keep following. Normally, he just explodes, and there aren’t many people that can beat him at the top.”

There aren’t many teams that can beat the Heat when LeBron and Wade are at their top levels, but neither is there right now. As long as they keep boosting each other, though, they can get close – and give Miami a chance to win.

Eastern Conference Finals Game 2: Can Pacers put on repeat performance?

Paul George, Roy Hibbert

In Game 1 of the Eastern Conference Finals Sunday the Pacers scored 119 points per 100 possessions and absolutely devastated the Heat defense. Indiana played smart pick-and-roll basketball to expose Miami’s poor rotations as the roll man got a lot of good looks in the paint. Indiana moved the ball, hit 8-of-19 shots from three, and made Miami look a step slow all game long. The Pacers were the aggressors, getting to the free throw line 37 times to the Heat’s 15.

It was not at all what anyone expected — the Pacers were built to grind the Heat down, not outscore them. Which begs the real question for Game 2:

Can the Pacers replicate that performance?

Or, was Game 1 a “one off” that will not look like any other game in this series?

We will find out Tuesday night with Game 2 between these teams in Indiana.

First off, expect a much more aggressive Miami defense. In Game 1 the Heat let the Pacers start their sets and get to their spots on the floor with little disruption, that will not be the case this time around. Also, expect much sharper defensive rotations for Miami, particularly off the pick-and-roll. The Pacers roll man continually got the ball in the paint and made plays, expect Miami to defend that with more aggressive play. However, in Game 1 the Pacers hit 8-of-14 from the midrange and 41.2 percent from three, do that again Miami will struggle to stop them.

Expect Udonis Haslem to start and Shane Battier to come off the bench, as the Heat did in the second half of Game 1. Miami needs the size and defense to match up better with Indiana — Roy Hibbert and David West combined for 38 points, 16 rebounds and six assists in Game 1. Don’t expect to see Greg Oden, who coach Eric Spoelstra said after Game 1 was not physically ready to go.

What Miami also needs is someone to play well on offense who is not named LeBron James or Dwyane Wade. We’re looking at you, Chris Bosh. He was 4-of-12 shooting and 0-of-5 from three in Game 1. Miami needs Bosh’s jump shot to pull the Heat bigs out of the paint and create room for LeBron and Wade to drive the lane. Bosh can do that. Also Miami could use more Ray Allen or Mario Chalmers or anyone else who can get hot from three and give them some points.

Indiana still has matchup advantages — mainly Miami doesn’t have a great answer for Roy Hibbert, who had 19 points (9 earned at the free throw line) and 9 rebounds in Game 1. But Hibbert has been anything but consistent these playoffs, posting some zero-zero games as well. He’s had games where he didn’t fight for position, or didn’t get the ball when he did. It begs the question which Roy Hibbert shows up on Tuesday?

It’s really the same question for Paul George and the entire Pacers offense — can they do it in back-to-back games? Because so far in these playoffs (and over the final months of the season) they have often followed a strong performance with a dud. The Pacers have been the very definition of inconsistent, a team Has Miami woken them up? Will the Pacers defense that was built to make life difficult for the Heat continue to thrive on Tuesday night?

Or was Game 1 a one off?