Tag: Ryan Kelly

2015 NBA Draft

Phil Jackson questions whether Duke players live up to expectations in NBA


The Knicks drafted Kristaps Porzingis with the No. 4 pick, and the early returns are positive.

But they also surely considered a couple players from Duke – Jahlil Okafor (who went No. 3 to the 76ers) and Justise Winslow (No. 10 to the Heat).

Would New York have chosen either? Knicks president Phil Jackson implies he had concerns simply because of their college team.

Jackson on Okafor, via Charlie Rosen of ESPN:

Jackson thinks he might not be aggressive enough. “Also, if you look at the guys who came to the NBA from Duke, aside from Grant Hill, which ones lived up to expectations?”

Let’s take a comprehensive look rather than cherry-picking players who could support either side of the argument.

We obviously don’t know yet whether Okafor, Winslow and Tyus Jones (No. 24 this year) will live up to expectations. Jabari Parker (No. 2 in 2014) looked pretty good last year, but he missed most of the season due to injury. It’s far too soon to make any judgments on him.

Otherwise, here are all Duke players drafted in the previous 15 years:

Lived up to expectations

  • Rodney Hood (No. 23 in 2014)
  • Mason Plumlee (No. 22 in 2013)
  • Ryan Kelly (No. 48 in 2013)
  • Miles Plumlee (No. 26 in 2012)
  • Kyrie Irving (No. 1 in 2011)
  • Kyle Singler (No. 33 in 2011)
  • Josh McRoberts (No. 37 in 2007)
  • J.J. Redick (No. 11 in 2006)
  • Luol Deng (No. 7 in 2004)
  • Chris Duhon (No. 38 in 2004)
  • Carlos Boozer (No. 34 in 2002)
  • Shane Battier (No. 6 in 2001)

Didn’t live up to expectations

  • Austin Rivers (No. 10 in 2012)
  • Nolan Smith (No. 21 in 2011)
  • Gerald Henderson (No. 12 in 2009)
  • Shelden Williams (No. 5 in 2006)
  • Daniel Ewing (No. 32 in 2005)
  • Dahntay Jones (No. 20 in 2003)
  • Mike Dunleavy (No. 3 in 2002)
  • Jay Williams (No. 2 in 2002)
  • Chris Carrawell (No. 41 in 2000)

That’s 12-of-21 – a 57 percent hit rate.

By comparison, here are players drafted from North Carolina in the same span:

Lived up to expectations

  • Harrison Barnes (No. 7 in 2012)
  • John Henson (No. 14 in 2012)
  • Tyler Zeller (No. 17 in 2012)
  • Ed Davis (No. 13 in 2010)
  • Tyler Hansbrough (No. 13 in 2009)
  • Ty Lawson (No. 18 in 2009)
  • Wayne Ellington (No. 28 in 2009)
  • Danny Green (No. 46 in 2009)
  • Brandan Wright (No. 8 in 2007)
  • Brendan Haywood (No. 20 in 2001)

Didn’t live up to expectations

  • Reggie Bullock (No. 25 in 2013)
  • Kendall Marshall (No. 13 in 2012)
  • Reyshawn Terry (No. 44 in 2007)
  • David Noel (No. 39 in 2006)
  • Marvin Williams (No. 2 in 2005)
  • Raymond Felton (No. 5 in 2005)
  • Sean May (No. 13 in 2005)
  • Rashad McCants (No. 14 in 2005)
  • Joseph Forte (No. 21 in 2001)

The Tar Heels are 10-for-19 – 53 percent.

Nobody would reasonably shy from drafting players from North Carolina, and they’ve fared worse than Duke players. Making snap judgments about Duke players just because they went to Duke is foolish.

Jackson is talking about a different time, when aside from Hill, Duke had a long run of first-round picks failing to meet expectations:

  • Roshown McLeod (No. 20 in 1998)
  • Cherokee Parks (No. 12 in 1995)
  • Bobby Hurley (No. 7 in 1993)
  • Christian Laettner (No. 3 in 1992)
  • Alaa Abdelnaby (No. 25 in 1990)
  • Danny Ferry (No. 2 in 1989)

Then, it was fair to question whether Mike Krzyzewski’s coaching yielded good college players who didn’t translate to the pros. But there have been more than enough counterexamples in the years since to dismiss that theory as bunk or outdated.

Count this as another example of Jackson sounding like someone who shouldn’t run an NBA team in 2015.

To be fair, the Knicks had a decent offseason, at least once you acknowledge they couldn’t land a star (which was kind of supposed to be Jackson’s job, right?).

The questions Knicks fans must ask themselves: Do you trust Jackson because of the moves he has made or worry about the next move because of what he has said?

Ed Davis declines player option with Lakers, becomes an unrestricted free agent

Los Angeles Lakers v Sacramento Kings

Ed Davis averaged 8.3 points and 7.8 rebounds while appearing in 23.3 minutes per contest for what was a dismal Lakers team last year, and he could have chosen to return by activating his player option for just over $1.1 million for next season.

But size is always at a premium, and because Davis is capable of producing in a frontcourt role, it’s likely that he’ll be able to secure more guaranteed money over more years to play somewhere else.

From Lakers.com:

Ed Davis … became a free agent when he did not pick up the option on the second year of his contract with Los Angeles. The 25-year-old was effective in the pick-and-roll and on the offensive glass, while providing quality defense at the rim from the weak side, and on his man.

Davis needed to make 18 more baskets to qualify for the NBA’s field goal percentage leaderboard, where he would have ranked second at 60.1 behind only DeAndre Jordan.

The Lakers have very few players with guaranteed contract for next season. Once you get past Kobe Bryant, Nick Young, Julius Randle and Ryan Kelly, there are nothing but question marks remaining, which was largely by design.

L.A. is looking to rebuild quickly just as soon as it gets the chance. The moment an All-Star caliber free agent says yes to a max money offer, the Lakers will then add talent around that person in order to build a team capable of competing on a nightly basis. Until then, they’ll continue to sign players to short-term deals to maximize flexibility. Davis was useful last season, but his choice to pursue a long-term deal elsewhere this summer was completely expected.

Chandler Parsons had Ryan Kelly on skates (VIDEO)

Chandler Parsons, Tarik Black

Ryan Kelly is not known for his defense — he does play for the Lakers, after all — but Dallas’ Chandler Parsons dropped him to the floor Sunday night with a little step-back move. When Kelly went down, the lane opened up for Parsons to get to the rim and score two.

This move came during a 16-1 Dallas run in the fourth quarter that was key to the Mavericks’ come-from-behind win, 100-93.

Good thing Byron Scott got Kobe Bryant to be on the bench to witness this.