Tag: Russell Westbook

Miami Heat v Oklahoma City Thunder - Game One

Russell Westbrook will not be altering his game, thank you very much


Russell Westbrook, for reasons I struggle to comprehend, took a lot of flak for Game 2. Magic Johnson called it the worst performance by a point guard in the Finals. People have blamed the entire loss on him. As if, without Westbrook, the Thunder would have magically created his 27 points, 8 rebounds, and 7 assists. Was it efficient? Of course not. This is a series against one of the best defenses in the league. Efficiency is a commodity. He needs to get the efficiency up. He could have played better. But part of this is the role that Westbrook plays in the Thunder offense.

Someone has to soak up possessions. “It should be Kevin Durant!” you say. Durant will never shoot 28 times or more in a game, unless it’s in overtime. It’s not who he is, it’s not who he has ever been, it’s not how he’s made. He’s an efficient shooter who lets the game come to him. Someone has to take those shots. And when they’re falling? Westbrook can drop 40 with the same amount of effort. Shots didn’t fall. He still made plays, and his defense was light years ahead of Durant’s in Game 2. But no one will talk about that.

Whatever the case, Westbrook is having none of it, and he’s going to get grief for that, too. From media availability today:


Well, that’s going to go over great.

Outside of the double-negative which actually indicates he’s going to make an adjustment, this is the same kind of bold response you have to expect here. If athletes adjusted their games based on media pressure, LeBron would play in the post more and Dwight Howard would have a reliable hook shot. OK, those are bad examples. But it’s not the time for Westbook to be upending his game. He needs to do what he does. Westbrook needs to be Westbrook. The Thunder can win that way. But the Thunder have to play better defense. Westbrook can take five shots and Durant 40, and it won’t matter if they don’t play better defense. But by all means, let’s keep blaming Westbrook, the LeBron of the Oklahoma City Thunder.

Games of the night: Dallas has injuries, what was Denver’s excuse?

Kevin Durant dunks
1 Comment

Before the season, if you peaked ahead on the schedule, this looked like an interesting Thursday night of basketball. Turns out, not so much.

Thunder 99, Mavericks 95: Dallas has the much-discussed injuries to Dirk Nowitzki and Caron Butler. The effort is still there and while this is a deep team, there are limits to what they can do now. They can be beat.  Knowing that led to a flat Thunder team who played just one half of defense (the second half).

Turns out one half was enough. We could try to break this game down in detail, but I’m not sure there is a lot here we didn’t already know.

For Dallas, the old injury cliché rang true: It’s not the replacement player, it’s the replacement’s replacement. Shawn Marion and Jason Terry were forced to start with Nowitzki and Butler out. That meant guys who can create their own shot off the bench were gone. You end up with Brendan Haywood trying running hooks.

Maybe the best point guard in the game was Eric Maynor. (Russell Westbrook was 5-16 shooting, Jason Kidd 0-7.) Maynor played limited minutes (12) but when he was in he seemed to make things happen, and he finished with five points and four assists.

The other guy I love to watch because of his effort at both ends is Dallas’ DeShawn Stevenson. He just brings it and is earning more minutes.

Kings 122, Nuggets 102: The Kings came in to this 25th in the league in offensive efficiency, averaging 101.9 points per 100 possessions, and shooting 43.4 percent. Against the Nuggets they had 127.1 points per 100 possessions and shot 56.4 percent. Denver didn’t care about defense at all and the Kings have some talent on that roster if you really ignore them like that. Denver’s effort was embarrassing.

Credit Sacramento for stepping it up on the big stage. Denver fought back in the third quarter and closed a once 14-point lead down to a tie game, but the Kings kept fighting. And the Nuggets kept on playing individual ball and not defending.

The Kings attacked the rim hard, as evidenced by getting to the line 30 times on the night.

I like DeMarcus Cousins’ fire. The guy was jawing with Carmelo Anthony and would not back down. Call it hubris or whatever you wish, I like players who don’t back down like that. I don’t want rookies who just defer. Everything is going to come around for him one day and he will be a beast.