Tag: rule changes

LeBron James, Kane Fitzgerald

Shane Battier would welcome anti-flop regulations, but wants offensive floppers penalized as well


A lot of NBA fans hate “flopping,” or the practice of a defensive player falling back like he was knocked clean out after an offensive player so much as touches him, with a passion. There has even been talk of passing some rules that would penalize a “flop.” Shane Battier, who is among the league leaders in charges taken, has some thoughts on anti-flop penalties, and they’re not exactly what you think they might be. Hoopidea’s Tom Haberstroh has the story:

You might be surprised to find out Battier’s stance on anti-flop regulation:

He’s all for it.

But there’s one key stipulation: offensive floppers would need to be called, too.

Battier joked that offensive flopping is “the silent killer” of the league. Sure, charge-takers might exaggerate the impact of a collision, but offensive players aren’t exactly innocent either. In Battier’s mind, an anti-flopping measure would need to be implemented on both ends of the floor.

“As long as they have the same penalty against offensive floppers – guys who drive through the lane and throw back their head and flail and cry – then I’d have no problem with it on the defensive end,” Battier said.

Battier singled out long-haired former teammate Luis Scola for using his hair to draw whistles, and he does have a point about “offensive flopping” — it’s become completely ordinary to see players fly back when they get bumped dribbling on the perimeter, jerk their head back in the way Battier described when going to the rim, and shout “and-1!” every time they put up a layup attempt in traffic.

The league has already tried to crack down some on “cheap points” by officially eliminating the “rip move” this off-season, but Battier would apparently be in favor of doing something like fining offensive floppers or making an “offensive flop” a turnover, which would deny the chance for an offensive rebound. Flopping is and always will be extremely hard to regulate, but it’s always fun to see a smart guy like Battier discuss some potential rule changes.

(By the way, my two cents on flopping: if referees were willing to call offensive fouls when a defender has good position, gets run into, and stays on his feet while trying to contest the shot, we might see less guys sliding across the floor when an offensive player’s move to the basket generates a slight breeze. Just a thought.)

International goaltending among rule changes Stern wants


We’re optimists. We’re not going to focus today on the lockout and the “if there is basketball next season” questions, because there will be plenty of time for that coming up.

Let’s talk about the game. Because while the league is hammering out financial issues, it will also talk about some rule changes.

And one David Stern says he is going to push for is the international goaltending rule — once the ball hits the rim it is live. If it hits the rim you can dunk it in or just swat it off the rim. It takes the Kendrick Perkins play out of the equation, that would have been legal.

Here is what Stern told 790 The Ticket in Miami (via Sports Radio Interviews).

“Well I’m going to urge the owners — and it’s not very radical but we were talking about it for awhile — to adopt the international rule on basket interference. That is to say, once the ball hits the rim it’s in play. Because I think that it’s too hard to call. I think that we don’t want to stop the game every time to see if it’s the right call, but the camera that looks down on the basket can tell the story if the refs have gotten it right. And it’s just impossible to call to make whether the ball’s touching the rim, on the rim, off the rim or the like. And I think that would make the game faster, better, and less controversial. And I think we’re going to be putting in more — I forget the exact number — just more replay opportunities because we really want to get it right. So those are the biggest things. I also think we’re going to be talking about cutting out a timeout or two to move the game along. The last period, even in a close game, shouldn’t begin to approach an hour.”

When the idea of the international rule first came up, some European players questioned how well it would work with the athletes of the NBA — there are a lot of leapers who are going to alter balls on the rim. More athletes here than in Europe who will do that.

But the D-League had the rule in place and it seemed to get good reviews. So it may be one. Which is going to make next season interesting if the owners vote it in. Well, once we get to next season. But we’re not going there today.

D-League to adopts FIBA goaltending, overtime rules; may be NBA testing ground


Thumbnail image for D-league.gifAfter the World Championships, FIBA — meaning the world — adopted some NBA rules. For example, gone is the trapezoid key in international tournaments, replaced by the NBA rectangular key.

But now the NBA may be looking at some FIBA rules in return.

The D-League — often a testing ground for NBA rule changes — is taking on two key FIBA rules, according to Scott Schroeder of FanHouse.

The biggest is the goaltending rule. In international play, once a ball hits the rim it is live, you can go up and knock it off. A shot that bounces on the rim and is settling to fall in can be legally knocked off. (As opposed to current NBA rules, where there is an imaginary cylinder over the basket and any time that the ball is in that cylinder it cannot be touched.)

The other rule is a three-minute overtime, as opposed to the NBA’s five.

This leaves the D-League with different rules than the NBA — guys who are called up will have to change their thinking. But there is nothing wrong with that. Part of the purpose of a minor league is to try things out in game situations, to see what it feels like and how it works.

The goaltending rule would take away some borderline, questionable calls that we see now. But would it really improve the game? Who knows? But it is best to find out in game competition in the D-League rather than toying with the NBA itself just to see.