Tag: Ronny Turiaf

Ronny Turiaf

Timberwolves’ Ronny Turiaf out indefinitely after suffering fractured elbow


The Timberwolves had their season completely derailed last year by injuries to the bulk of the team’s core rotation players.

While the stars are healthy in Minnesota for now, another reserve went down with an injury that should keep him sidelined for quite some time.

Ronny Turiaf, signed this summer for frontcourt depth as a free agent, crashed to the floor after playing just three minutes and appeared to land directly on his elbow. The team confirmed on Saturday that an MRI showed it was fractured.

Turiaf isn’t a statistical wonder or anything, but he’s a more than capable big man in spurts off the bench whose energy usually helps more than it hurts. No timetable has been set for his return, which means more Derrick Williams and Gorgui Deng minutes with the second unit for the foreseeable future.

ProBasketballTalk 2013-14 Preview: Los Angeles Clippers

DeAndre Jordan

Last season: The Clippers finished the regular season with a franchise best 56 wins, good enough for the fourth seed in the West and home court advantage in the first round of the playoffs over the Memphis Grizzlies.

L.A. went up two games to none in the series, before Memphis came back to win the series in six. Vinny Del Negro wasn’t fired, because his contract was up at season’s end. But he wasn’t offered a new contract, either, and the way the Clippers exited the postseason was viewed as the reason why.

Chris Paul re-upped with a max contract as expected, but not before he was reportedly “angry” over the organization letting it leak that he was the one who forced the parting of ways with Del Negro — something we all knew, and didn’t need anyone on the inside to confirm publicly. All ended well, however, as the Clippers were able to pry Doc Rivers from the Celtics to patrol the sidelines this season.

Last season’s signature highlight: In the last moment before things fell apart in the playoffs, Chris Paul’s game-winner at the Game 2 buzzer sent the Clippers back to Memphis with a 2-0 lead in the series.

Key player changes: The Clippers turned over much of their bench from a season ago, which included trading the young and talented Eric Bledsoe to the Suns. But they’ve appeared to upgrade significantly overall, bolstering the team’s reserve unit for a longer postseason run this time around.

  • IN: J.J. Redick and Jared Dudley were acquired in the three-team trade that sent Bledsoe to Phoenix. Darren Collison, who had success backing up Paul in their days together in New Orleans was signed in free agency, as was former Bobcats big man Byron Mullens. Antawn Jamison was signed to a one-year free agent contract, as well. Reggie Bullock was selected with the 25th overall pick in this summer’s draft. Lou Amundson is in camp on a non-guaranteed deal.
  • OUT: Bledsoe via trade, Chauncey Billups and Ronny Turiaf via free agency, Lamar Odom via … (we’ll leave that alone), and Grant Hill via retirement.

Keys to the Clippers season:

1) DeAndre Jordan, defensive anchor: Doc Rivers has appointed Jordan as the one to singlehandedly transform the defensive unit by becoming its backbone. So far, Jordan is happily embracing that responsibility. During the preseason, Jordan is active, engaged, and energized on the defensive end of the floor — he’s talking nonstop, calling out the other team’s plays followed by how his guys are to adjust, and playing with a fire rarely seen in NBA big men consistently over the course of an 82-game season.

That’s going to be the question with Jordan — is he willing to sustain the effort? With Rivers as his head coach, it’s a safe bet that the answer might be “yes.” And if that’s the case, the Clippers will be an extremely difficult matchup all season long.

2) Creating chemistry: The Clippers have a lot of new pieces to fit together, along with a new (although well-respected and experienced) head coach trying to put them all into place. Some minor injuries have prevented Rivers from truly seeing what he has all at once, and keep in mind, there are guys who may be asked to play smaller yet more important roles this year than they have in seasons past. There haven’t been any issues with it in the preseason, of course, but Rivers knows there could be bumps in the road in that department in the future.

“I don’t know if you can have a chemistry test until you go through adversity, to be honest,” Rivers said before the Clippers faced the Suns during the preseason in Phoenix. “Every team in the league right now is getting along. Once the season starts and rotations are set, the amount of touches you get and all that stuff, then you’ll find out how much we all get along. I think we get along great, but no one knows [yet].”

3) Increased output from Blake Griffin and Chris Paul: Paul is the best point guard in the game, but he may need to increase his production for the Clippers to reach new heights. He averaged 16.9 points and 9.7 assists per game, but is capable of so much more offensively. Now granted, he has plenty of talent surrounding him, and if the ball movement is there and guys do what they’re supposed to, it may work out just fine. But Paul is a killer out there in terms of his competitiveness, and it may not be a bad idea to unleash that on the rest of the league a little more often this season.

As for Griffin, it’s hard to believe he’s entering just his fourth full season. He’s already a beast to deal with down low, but he could use a little more finesse to his game to avoid foul trouble and be able to create offense for himself a little bit more easily. He’s still developing, and if he can make some subtle changes to the way he plays around the basket (think less Anthony Mason and more Karl Malone), his averages of 18 and 8 could see a significant increase.

Why you should watch: Doc Rivers is known for his defensive coaching ability, and the Clippers were 15th out of 16 teams in terms of defensive efficiency in the playoffs. After the first two games against Memphis, they couldn’t slow them consistently or get stops when it mattered. Whether or not the transformation will occur defensively is going to be intriguing, to say the least.

Prediction: The top six teams in the West are all fairly close in terms of overall talent and projected ability to come out atop the Conference standings. But I’ll go ahead and buy into the preseason hype surrounding DeAndre Jordan, and Doc Rivers’ ability to make sure he sustains it all year long. Defense and consistent outside shooting were the major deficiencies this Clippers team was facing, and those needs appear to have been met during the offseason. A 60-win campaign is not out of reach if things fall into place, and a trip to the Western Conference Finals — at minimum — seems to be where the Clippers should land this season.

ProBasketballTalk 2013-14 Preview: Minnesota Timberwolves

Kevin Love, Nikola Pekovic, Ricky Rubio
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Last season: The Timberwolves never had much of a chance to finish better than their 31-51 record, thanks to a rash of injuries to the team’s top players. Kevin Love, Ricky Rubio, Chase Budinger and Nikola Pekovic all missed substantial time due to injury, rendering the season an unforced failure in the process.

Signature highlight from last season: Rough year in Minnesota, so how about we spread the wealth a little? Here are the top 10 plays as determined by the NBA, and notice there’s a lot of Ricky Rubio, a little Derrick Williams, and not much else — indicative of the kind of season it was.

Key player changes: The biggest improvement in Minnesota will come from its healthy star players, but there were a few free agent additions that the team hopes will complement the talent it already has in place on the roster.

  • IN: Corey Brewer, coming off of a huge season in Denver, was signed as a free agent to complete his second tour of duty with the Timberwolves. Minnesota also decided that Kevin Martin was worth four years and more than $27 million, and they signed veteran Ronny Turiaf to a small two-year deal to add another big man to the frontcourt rotation. Shabazz Muhammad is a rookie who was selected with the 14th overall pick in this summer’s draft.
  • OUT: Andrei Kirilenko signed with the Nets in free agency. Greg Stiemsma was signed by the Pelicans in free agency. Luke Ridnour was traded to the Bucks.

Keys to the Timberwolves’ season:

1) Stay Healthy: The Timberwolves have done an excellent job of assembling talent through the draft, signing existing quality players to long-term deals, and adding role players in free agency. Now, if they can only stay healthy.

Give us anywhere close to 82 games from the combination of Ricky Rubio, Kevin Love, Nikola Pekovic and the rest of the team’s role players, and along with a tenured and proven head coach in Rick Adelman guiding the ship, it’s tough to envision Minnesota finishing out of the postseason once again. The talent is there; it simply needs to materialize on the court for more than twenty-something games in a single season.

2) Don’t slip defensively: As troubled as the Timberwolves were a season ago with their high volume of injuries, they managed to finish 14th in defensive efficiency. The offense was brutal, of course, but that’s to be expected when your star players are sidelined. Defense is about individual effort and team scheme more than anything else, and if Minnesota can replicate last year’s defensive output with this year’s talent, substantial improvement should not only be expected, it should be evident very early in the season.

3) Can the offense catch up? Theoretically, having a full complement of talented players would fix any team’s offensive woes. In Minnesota’s case, that would mean a necessary improvement in a category where the team ranked near the bottom of the league (25th) last season.

Three-point shooting has become a critical component of successful NBA teams in recent years, and the Timberwolves ranked dead last in that category by shooting 30.5 percent from beyond the arc as a team last season. The presence of Love and the return of Brewer should help in that area, and it better if Minnesota wants to increase its offensive efficiency — a statistic that (normally, unless you’re the Bulls) directly translates into wins and losses.

Why you should watch: It’s easy to follow the favorites, but it’s more fun to join the journey of a good team on the rise. Rubio and Love are two of the more fun players in the game to watch, and they’re going to be in the mix for a playoff spot all season long.

Prediction: Minnesota has too much going for them (when healthy) not to make the playoffs. The mere presence of Love and Rubio, along with the additions of Martin and Brewer should be enough to show dramatic improvement offensively. That should in turn result in enough wins — in the 45-48 range — to secure the Timberwolves a postseason spot.

Timberwolves trying to get Alexey Shved to smile more

Alexey Shved

The Russian culture is not one of smiles — the Moscow Times traces it back to the Cold War and before, noting that generations were raised about how Americans had insincere smiles. The stereotypical Russian disposition comes off as a little more austere.

Alexey Shved is Russian, but the Minnesota backup point guard plays on a team with two guys who have an outward exuberance for playing the game — Ricky Rubio and Ronny Turiaf.

This preseason, those two are trying to get Shved to open up and have a little fun reports the Star Tribune.

Last season, TNT’s wired microphone caught Ricky Rubio imploring Shved to “Change your face, be happy, enjoy it” coming out of a timeout in a video snippet that careened around the Internet.

Now Turiaf unknowingly has joined the chorus, encouraging the second-year Russian guard to play with more joy and less concern for his errors while coach Rick Adelman just wants Shved to become more “engaged” when he’s playing off the ball.

“If Alexey smiles, everything else takes care of itself,” Turiaf said. “If he doesn’t smile, he’s a different player.”

Shved may not be that expressive naturally — although he seems to be with his hair — but also likely feels a little more isolated. Last season he was tight with fellow Russian (and CSKA Moscow teammate) Andrei Kirilenko, but now AK-47 is in Brooklyn. Shved may withdraw a little naturally.

Shved showed flashes of great playmaking skill and some creativity his rookie season. He also got forced into a much bigger role that he was likely ready for thanks to the wave of injuries that washed over Minnesota last season. This season, with a healthy Rubio, he should play a more limited role that better suits him.

Timberwolves coach Rick Adelman says in the same story he wants Rubio to work harder off the ball, he’s not so concerned about the smiles. Makes sense as Shved has had the ball in his hands more before he came to the NBA so playing off it is a new experienced.

Either way, Shved could become one of the better backup point guards in the league. If he’s having fun.

Channing Frye on his return to Suns: ‘I never felt like I was done’

Channing Frye
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PHOENIX — The big news out of Suns media day on Monday was the team making official what Channing Frye had announced personally the night before: that he has been cleared to play by a multitude of physicians, and will be back on the active roster beginning immediately.

“There’s a lot of weird feelings going on right now,” Frye said. “It’s been a long year. It’s been one of the hardest years I’ve had to go through, because I couldn’t do anything. I couldn’t rehab it, I couldn’t go out on the court and work on it. It was something [where] I just had to sit, and wait, and heal.”

Frye missed all of last season with what was diagnosed as an enlarged heart. He was unable to exercise at all while recovering, and just recently started to work his way back into shape. As for basketball activity, there has been very little by Frye’s own admission — dribbling and shooting here and there, but certainly no full-court runs.

But before basketball comes health, and during Frye’s year-long absence, he was forced to deal with something that could have been even more severe had it continued to go unnoticed.

“It was very serious,” he said. “Every doctor I went to was like, ‘thank God we caught it when we did.’ There could have been some serious repercussions.”

Frye gave us a grossly oversimplified medical explanation of what his issue was.

“My heart had a cold for a year, it went away,” he said. “So now I’m better.”

Frye is expected to be a full participant in training camp, with no restrictions. He was emphatic when asked if he needed to be on any medication.

“None. No way. I’m all healthy,” was Frye’s response.

He’ll undergo testing every six months, which he seemed to be much more open to than being consistently medicated. Now that he’s been completely cleared for activity, Frye was adamant that he won’t be tentative once he returns to the court for workouts.

“No, we’ve got too good of a [training staff] for that,” he said. “They’re not going to let me go out on the court if I’m scared, and it’s just not my attitude. I’m a zero or a hundred type of guy. When I go out there I’ll go as hard as I can in a safe environment, and if the trainers or the coaches see anything, [they’ll tell me] to take a step back.”

Frye consulted with fellow NBA players Chris Wilcox, Jeff Green, and Ronny Turiaf for advice, considering they all went through a heart condition which took them away from the game for a period of time. They told Frye to listen to what the doctors tell you, get multiple opinions, and ultimately do what’s best for you and your family.

Frye didn’t have to return to the NBA, obviously. Not only has he amassed more than $28 million in career earnings with two more guaranteed contract years ahead of him, but he reminded us that with his education, he could easily go do something else.

“I could be a teacher if I want to,” Frye said. “I’ve got my degree now.”

But he doesn’t have to pursue other options just yet. When asked about his choice to come back, Frye pointed to the motivation of overcoming his illness, along with a feeling inside that told him he still had something left to give to the game he loves.

“I just felt like I was never done,” Frye said. “Even when things didn’t look good, I just felt like I wasn’t done yet. And I was determined to approach this like I approach everything else.

“I wasn’t always the best, I wasn’t always the strongest or the tallest or the fastest. I just want to play ball, you know? It’s what I’m supposed to do, and I never felt like I was done.”