Tag: Ron Artest

Kobe Bryant, Metta World Peace, Ron Artest

Metta World Peace is at peace with coming off Lakers bench


The idea of starting Matt Barnes and bringing the disruptive play of Metta World Peace off the bench makes some sense, you can see why Lakers coach Mike Brown wants to try it.

The question was always, how would World Peace react? (Yes, I get how weirdly that sentence reads, but I refuse to just to go with “we have to give Peace a chance.”)

Turns out, Peace is cool with it, as reported in the Daily News.

‘It’s going to be good. I get a chance to come in and have more responsibility, which is good. It’s going to make the other team off balance. Kobe, Pau and Bynum are going to be out and you’re still going to have to double-team me. You can’t leave me alone on the block by myself.”

Brown used an old Phil Jackson trick and made his point to Artest in front of the media, just to make the promise public.

Brown: “If that second unit ain’t rolling, who’s fault is it going to be?”

World Peace: “Me.”

Brown: “It’s on you. We’ve had this discussion a couple of times. If the second unit ain’t rolling, who am I going to come to first?”

World Peace: “Right here.”

No, seriously, Metta World Peace is Metta World Peace this season


I think a lot of us thought when Ron Artest announced he was changing his name to Metta World Peace that he was kidding. I mean, no one would actually do that, right? Another crazy Ron Artest thing, like playing in Britain, or being a rapper.


From the Lakers’ official Twitter feed at practice today:


So it’s real.

It’s like a unicorn showed up on the Lakers’ court.

Don’t expect many amnesty clause players this season

Arenas magic

Finally, thanks to an amnesty clause in the new labor deal, every NBA team can wipe one bad contract off their books and never have to deal with it again. A “get out of jail free” card for NBA GMs. We like to call it the Gilbert Arenas rule. That should lead to a flood of players kicked to the curb, right? RIGHT?

Wrong. More like a trickle.

Because teams have a few years to use it (so long as the player is on the roster pre-lockout they can use it whenever), most teams are putting the amnesty card in their back pocket, reports Howard Beck at the New York Times.

“I don’t think there will be very many at all,” said one team executive, who asked to remain anonymous while the lockout remains in effect.

At most, three to six teams will take advantage of the amnesty clause this year, the executive said — a view that was echoed by others around the league. The reasons are varied and complicated.

Some teams are so far above the cap that removing one player will not provide room to sign free agents. A few teams have such low payrolls that they would dip below the minimum-payroll requirements. At least 10 teams have no obvious candidates for amnesty.

We call it the Gilbert Arenas rule, although the Magic could use it on Hedo Turkoglu and we’d understand. (Remember in all cases the player still gets paid his full contract, it just comes off salary cap and luxury tax numbers.) But that is the exception of having an obvious target to amnesty.

A more typical case might be the Los Angeles Lakers. Sure, they would like to trim some of the $93 million they have in salary next season and to amnesty a player is one way. They could use it on Luke Walton, but he comes off the books the same year the tax goes up so you only really get a short-term boost letting him go. They could let Metta World Peace (Ron Artest) go, he is owed three years and $18.8 million. But wouldn’t the Lakers be better off trying to win with him for another year and then losing him next season (or the season after when the tax goes up)? The Lakers are way over the cap and the luxury tax line, who are they going to pick up that is better than World Peace to fill that role?

Most GMs don’t have an obvious hand to play, so they may sit on their cards and see how things play out. They know when to hold ‘em.

Of course, if they hadn’t given out these contracts in the first place….