Tag: Rodrigue Beaubois

Oklahoma City Thunder v Dallas Mavericks - Game Five

NBA Playoffs: Mavs win with offensive potency despite the absences of Butler and Beaubois

1 Comment

As the Dallas Mavericks are doused with the effusive praise that comes with being a conference champion, let’s not forget that their incredible accomplishments have come despite their two X-factors watching in suits from the sideline.

It’s odd to discuss a team headed to the NBA finals in terms of substantial setbacks, but there’s simply no other way to address the season-ending injury to Caron Butler and the gradual irrelevance of Rodrigue Beaubois. Both were supposed to be significant players for Dallas this season, and it’s a testament to the team’s depth and the efficacy of those available that the Mavs stand atop the Western Conference.

Butler is by far the more significant loss, as the Mavs knew exactly what he could offer this particular team during this particular season. Dallas’ early success on both ends of the court was because of Butler’s adjustments to better accommodate the team; gone was the ball-stopper of a year ago, and in his place stood an effective perimeter defender willing to move within the offense and play within himself.

The Mavericks were a tremendously successful and dynamic team with Butler in the fold; imagine them as they are now, but with an effective, involved version of DeShawn Stevenson. Butler connected on 43.1 percent of his 3-point attempts and 45 percent of his attempts overall — notably improved marks from his initial half-season of adjustment in Dallas following the 2010 trade deadline. He seemingly found his place within the offense and the team as a whole, and though Butler posted a PER of just 14.2 (relatively average, but low by the standards of his career), his value in terms of defense and shot creation far exceed that number.

As for Beaubois, this season’s Mavs lost out on an unquantifiable potential impact. He was the team’s second-best per-minute scorer a season ago, and an efficient bucket-getting machine. This year was supposed to be an extension of that same theme, a development and growth of Beaubois as a player and a point guard. Yet as much as Beaubois’ future was discussed in terms of what could be (both from a skill and positional standpoint), all of that rhetoric was a thinly veiled assessment of what would be.

Beaubois was deemed untouchable by Mark Cuban because he was seen as a sure thing, and public assessments of his game were equally optimistic. At worst, Beaubois would be a tremendous scorer capable of driving and shooting his way to 20-point nights on the regular. His length and athleticism give him great defensive potential, and his relative inexperience with the game left plenty of growing room for Beaubois’ budding passing and ball-handling abilities.

Beaubois may still hold those same natural predispositions for NBA effectiveness, but this season — one in which he was held out of 54 games because of complications surrounding an offseason foot injury — has understandably tarnished his perceived potential. Something for Beaubois never really clicked this season; his scoring instincts misled him, and he oscillated between periods of extreme passivity and offensive overextension. The scoring that had been at the core of Beaubois’ game deserted him, and while he still scored 17.1 points per 36 minutes, Beaubois’ efficiency plummeted. At moments, he looked like a dime-a-dozen undersized two guard, capable of scoring in bursts but largely inefficient.

Yet despite the losses of the actual and the potential, the Mavs persevered. Shawn Marion stepped into more minutes and an expanded offensive role, the kind which had been denied him by Dallas’ almost superfluous depth. Peja Stojakovic recovered from the mysterious back injuries that had kept him off the court in Toronto, and became a semi-regular contributor. Yet even more importantly, Jason Terry and J.J. Barea rebounded from their slow starts. Barea didn’t top 40 percent shooting during a month of the regular season until January, and his 3-point shooting hit almost comical lows in the mid-teens. ‘JET’ improved his field-goal shooting by 6 percent between January and February, and hasn’t looked back.

Neither player was limited by the system or even the clutter on the depth chart, but simply had failed to tap into the specific strengths of their games during the season’s opening months. Throw in a fully transcendent performance from Dirk Nowitzki, and you have the current, actualized product.

They didn’t need a big trade for a quasi-star wing or any kind of revamp — just consistency. Just an established effort to work through the season with the players available, with the knowledge that guys like Terry and Barea were better than their performance indicated. Rick Carlisle, Donnie Nelson, and Mark Cuban knew that Marion was still a capable offensive player. They knew that Stojakovic could contribute in spots, and while he couldn’t replace Butler, he could at least hedge the loss of his perimeter shooting. And perhaps most importantly, they knew Nowitzki could still act as a sufficient centerpiece without additional help, and Jason Kidd could be trusted to pull everything together on both ends.

This run to the NBA finals required the perfect mix of ingredients and circumstance, but so do all runs to the finals. It’s only because of the persistence of this roster, coaching staff and front office that this group was able to grow, thrive, and take the Western Conference by storm.

Beaubois out, Stevenson in as playoff starter in Dallas

DeShawn Stevenson
1 Comment

And this is where Dallas really misses Caron Butler…

After Rodrigue Beaubois struggled as the team’s starting two guard since returning from an injury, Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle has decided to put DeShawn Stevenson back in as the starter, according to Tim MacMahon at ESPN Dallas.

While Carlisle went Belichick and tried to hide his intentions, it was pretty obvious what was going down. And mostly it is Beauois that is going down for now.

“Things change,” Carlisle said. “And you’ve got to be judged by performance. I think the last time I said, ‘I’m sticking with this kid’ was over a week ago. Some things have changed in that period of time. That’s just the way it is.”

Beaubois is potentially dynamic, the kind of quick and creative player the Mavericks really need. Except he hasn’t been, he’s looked like a guy who had all his confidence taken away. He has shot just 42.2 percent (down from 51.8 last year), and is shooting 30 percent from three (down from 40). He can’t hit from the midrange and his turnovers have increased. Carlisle gave Beaubois every chance to earn the starting job, but now that the games really matter he’s going back to what worked.

Stevenson worked, and his teammates are glad to have him back as a starter.

“He’s so solid, man — just defensive presence, understands our defensive scheme, being able to knock down open shots, he’s not going to get out of his box, he’s going to make the right pass, just that person on the court that’s just solid,” center Tyson Chandler said. “We need more that.”

Solid is good. Better than what Roddy B. was giving them. But will solid be enough against a dynamic and confident Trail Blazer team?

How they can win it all: The Dallas Mavericks

Dallas Mavericks v Washington Wizards

Of all of this year’s contending teams, the Dallas Mavericks are perhaps the most improbable champions. Their trials begin in the first round, as the Mavs are rewarded for winning the West’s No. 3 seed with a tough matchup against the Portland Trailblazers. Should they take care of business against Portland, Dallas would likely have to fight through Los Angeles, followed by either San Antonio or Oklahoma City, only to meet perhaps their fiercest competition yet in the NBA Finals. The road to a title is a tough one for any team, but even more so for Dallas; the Mavs just don’t have the statistical résumé of their contending contemporaries, making them the underdog in pretty much every series beyond the first round (or possibly even in the first round, depending on who you ask).

Still, Dallas didn’t win 57 games by some fluke, and they aren’t merely referred to as contenders just to create cross-Conference symmetry. At various points in the season, the Mavs played at a championship-worthy level on both ends of the court. They just need to tap into what it is that made them great earlier in the year. We know Dallas is capable, even if they didn’t play their best basketball in the final weeks of the regular season; here’s how the Mavs can turn that capability into their first ever NBA title:

1. Align a productive offense with an effective defense

Dallas began the 2010-2011 campaign as a highly effective defensive team with a struggling offense, transitioned into a highly effective defensive team with a fairly efficient offense, became a middling team rendered powerless by injuries, and then settled in as an inconsistent defensive team with an efficient offense. It’s been an interesting ride, to say the least.

Yet all of the ingredients are there for the Mavs. They’ve shown they can lock down on D, and their latest successes have come by way of efficient scoring. They just need to find a way to play solid basketball on both ends at the same time, something the Mavs haven’t really been able to do for a significant stretch all season. Caron Butler’s absence certainly makes things far more difficult than they could have been, but this is the hand Dallas was dealt. It’s up to those healthy enough to play to return to the root of their early season success without compromising the integrity of their offense — a tall order, but hardly impossible.

2. Get the most out of Rodrigue Beaubois

Even though the defensive end has been more problematic for the Mavs of late, a shot in the arm on offense couldn’t hurt. Theoretically, that’s where we could throw in an “Enter Rodrigue Beaubois,” but the second-year guard clearly has no sense of theatrical timing. Beaubois made his long-awaited return from a lingering foot injury soon after Caron Butler had been ruled out for the remainder of the regular season, a fortunate development for a Maverick team in need of Beaubois’ offensive skills. Yet since returning, Beaubois has been largely underwhelming; while slotted at either guard position, Beaubois has wobbled between being overly tentative to trying to force the action. That inability to find a stable middle ground may have cost Beaubois a spot in the rotation for the playoffs, too, as Rick Carlisle opted to remove the erratic — but intriguing — guard from the starting lineup for the Mavs’ final regular season game.

Still, Carlisle will have to reverse course in desperation if the Mavs aren’t able to revive their depressed defense. Beaubois still has the potential to be a series changer if he can center himself, and Dallas will likely need him to bring tangible offensive benefit if they’re to go on a deep playoff run. Dirk Nowitzki and Shawn Marion have become the only stable scorers in the Mavs’ rotation, and if Beaubois could balance the struggles of Jason Terry or Jason Kidd with a productive outing once in awhile, it could go a long way toward relieving Nowitzki and Marion from excessive defensive pressure.

3. Keep Tyson Chandler on the floor

Brendan Haywood and Ian Mahinmi are a fairly strong tandem as far as reserve centers go, but Tyson Chandler is just on another level in terms of his defensive impact. The reason Dallas was able to make such a substantial improvement on defense early in the season was mostly due to Chandler’s timely rotations; though Haywood and Mahinmi make honest attempts to protect the rim, neither is Chandler’s peer in regard to their ability to slide over and contest penetration. The difference between having Chandler in the lineup and either Haywood or Mahinmi is statistically palpable; not only are the Mavs 3.37 points per 100 possessions better on defense with Chandler in the game, but a more thorough look at their performance reveals that Dallas’ worst defensive showings coincide with Chandler’s lowest minute totals.

Rick Carlisle isn’t keeping Chandler’s minutes low by choice; because of his defensive role and physical style, Chandler tends to pick up fouls rather quickly. It’s essential that he avoids cheap, unnecessary fouls that would limit his playing time in the postseason, because the Mavs just aren’t the same defensive team without him on the court. However, it may also be prudent for Carlisle to be slightly less rigid in his approach toward Chandler’s fouls. In order to maximize his center’s minutes and effectiveness, it may not always be wise to pull him from the game, even when he picks up two personals in the first quarter or three in the first half. After all, doing so only creates an artificial cap on Chandler’s minutes when there needn’t be one.

The double-whammy: Chandler is also a far more useful offensive player than Haywood and Mahinmi, as he’s able to do both the little things (set better screens, catch the ball on the perimeter without being flustered) and the major things (convert offensive rebounds, finish alley-oops, hit the occasional elbow jumper) to facilitate the offense better than his center teammates. With that kind of two-way impact, foul trouble in a game or two could potentially turn a series. Dallas’ margin for error will be small even in the first round, and there’s no way the Mavs can live up to their potential with Chandler on the bench.

Video: Roddy Beaubois brings a little flair to Dallas

Dallas Mavericks v New Orleans Hornets
Leave a comment

Roddy Beaubois is starting to find a groove, getting his minutes up and looking more comfortable. Which is a good thing for the Mavericks.

And he’s still got that flair Dallas needs.

As evidence, we bring you a highlight from Dallas’ route of Golden State Sunday. Enjoy.

Roddy Beaubois to play for Mavericks Wednesday

Leave a comment

The Dallas Mavericks have a better record than the Los Angeles Lakers, but good luck finding someone outside of outside of northeast Texas that thinks they can win a playoff series if the two meet.

Thing is, we still haven’t seen the full, healthy Dallas Mavericks. We don’t know how good they really are.

But we’ll start to get an idea Wednesday when Roddy Beaubois returns to Dallas lineup for the first time this season, the Dallas Morning News reports.

“For the first time [Monday] at practice, he actually looked great,” said Ian Mahinmi, the Frenchman who has known Guadeloupe-born Beaubois for years when the two played in France together. “On his drive, he looked quick. He looked explosive. So it’s looking good. Obviously, you can tell that he gets winded super fast out there. But as far as moving from left to right and using his speed, it looks great.

“And talking to him on the side, he feels good. He’s not complaining too much about his foot.”

With the suddenly hot J.J. Barea under the weather Beaubois could get as much run as he could handle Wednesday.

The last time we saw Beaubois was when Dallas coach Rick Carlisle finally put him in out of desperation in Game 6 against the Spurs in the playoffs — after not calling his number for five games when the Mavs clearly needed the speed and energy he brings. Beaubois enters and looks great, sparking the Mavs to a chance to win Game 6… so Carlisle benches Beaubois for the fourth quarter. After that game the Mavs went on summer vacation.

But Dallas learned its lesson and Beaubois was going to get a big role this year, maybe start. Then he went and broke his foot and needed surgery.

He’s finally healed and is back. He will get one game before the All-Star break, then another weekend of workouts, then he is back in.

Beaubois brings a level of athleticism and speed nobody else on the Mavs has. Is that enough to push them past the Lakers or Spurs? Maybe not. But the Mavs aren’t going to repeat the same mistakes of last playoffs again.