Tag: Rod Benson

Miami Heat

There is so crying in basketball


Some Heat players cried in the locker room after the loss Sunday. So what?

The reaction from many around the league has been “I’ve been there.” Well, not in the Knicks locker room, they thought it was way funnier than anything Dane Cook ever said. But others took more muted tone.

Even Stan Van Gundy, who likes to smack around the Heat more than the next guy, kind of shrugged at that one, according to the Orlando Sentinel.

“We all have, but it’s not something I would comment on and tell you who or when or anything else,” Van Gundy said Monday. “But yeah, I think we’ve all had that. Usually playoff-type situations… Probably the only time I’ve seen it are in the games that sort of end your year in the playoffs. But yeah, I’ve seen it….

“I don’t care whether a guy cries or not,” Van Gundy said. “I don’t see what difference it makes. But I don’t have to fill three hours of a sports talk show. Those guys need something to talk about. Mike and Mike in the morning, I don’t know, how long are they on? Three or four hours? I guess there aren’t enough games to just talk about the games, so you gotta figure out who was crying in the locker room. I’m just glad that’s not my job – trying to figure out who was crying.”

Over at Hoopshype (via the Heat Index), baller and blogger Rod Benson wrote that he has cried after a game.

After an injury-riddled season that, at least in my mind, ruined my immediate chances of making the NBA, I had made my way back in time for the NCAA tournament. After battling with North Carolina State for most of the game, as always, it came down to the final minute. Unlike high school, I remember very clearly what happened. Somebody messed up on a switch and I had to run out at Cameron Bennerman, who pump faked the hell out of me, composed himself, and knocked in the game-winning three.

On the way back to the locker room, I broke down and started crying. At first, it was because I knew that if I had closed out short, he may have had a more difficult shot. I placed the blame on myself for losing the most important game of my college career and tears began to fall. I kind of felt stupid for crying, but I couldn’t help it.

When I sat down in the locker room, that’s when it really hit me. I actually sat there and cried for like 15 minutes straight.

Then Benson ties it back into the Heat.

These guys care. They care a lot, actually. Yes, they care what people think. They care that their legacies are on the line. They care about the city of Miami. They care about the NBA. They even care about you, their haters. How do I know they care? Because I know how much you have to care to cry after a loss.

I tend to side with Van Gundy here (and I’m not planning on making a habit out of that),  the crying is one thing, telling the media is another. Spoelstra should have known that would basically take over a NBA news cycle and likely not sit well in the locker room. It has people discussing if the Heat are soft, and that is one touchy subject around players. This was a mistake of player management.

But the fact they care enough to cry, that’s a sign that at some point they will figure it all out.

Rod Benson still can't catch a break, heads to Korea

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The cult of personality surrounding Rod Benson is rather incredible, but one unfortunate side effect appears to be the complete overshadowing of his game. Benson is in no way bound for NBA stardom, but as a 6-foot-10 rebounding machine, you’d think he would have received a legitimate NBA opportunity, but since going undrafted in 2006, Benson has yet to play a single NBA game.

He’ll likely keep that streak alive in the coming season, as according to Scott Schroeder of Ridiculous Upside, Benson has been drafted into the Korean Basketball League. What’s that? You’d like to know more about the KBL? Schroeder would love to oblige:

The KBL has a few peculiar rules (players have to be three years
removed from any NBA experience and at least two years removed from
European experience unless that experience came in Spain, Turkey,
Italy, Israel, Russia, Greece or China) and, beginning this year, teams
are only allowed one import for the entire game –  a change from last
season when teams could play both of their imports during the first and
fourth quarter of each game.

All that aside, they make up for it by signing imports to $400,000
contracts – $73,604 less than the NBA minimum contract that the
majority of these players would have to fight through an NBA training
camp to earn.

Frankly, though Benson has played well in the D-League, it’s not all that surprising he’ll be playing overseas next season. That amount of guaranteed money is a pretty decent allure for a player in Benson’s position, and it likely makes more financial sense than holding out hope for a training camp miracle.

Benson, despite his combined Summer League stat line (from two games in Vegas and four games in Orlando) of 5.4 points and 3.2 rebounds per game, actually played pretty well. Out of the three games in which he played more than 10 minutes, he had two notable showings: a 13-point, seven-rebound, three-block, two-steal, stat-stuffing performance against the D-League Select Team (natch), and a 12-point, six-rebound game against the Nets’ Summer League squad in which Benson shot 62.5% from the field.

It wasn’t good enough. Again. Maybe next year, Rod.

NBA Summer League begins today in Orlando

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Here’s how you spot the hoops junkies (well, besides the kind of pasty skin tones): They’re the ones coming to this site, scanning past the latest LeBron James update to see what is happening in Summer League play.

Today is the hoop junkies dream — the Orlando Summer League kicks off play. Come Friday, the attention shifts from hot and humid Florida to the insanely hot Las Vegas for NBA Summer League. (And spare me the “it’s a dry heat crap, when it’s 100 degrees at 10 at night, it’s too [bleeping] hot.)

Summer League is about rookies and sleepers. We get to see the top draft picks in their first NBA action, how they handle a faster pace and more athletic defenders. We get to see what second rounders might stand out (Chase Budinger looked good at Summer League last year, and that translated to the season). It’s not ball at the NBA level (or even D-League, really) but it’s a step up from college.

We also get to see guys on the fringe of the NBA try to make a statement that they belong, guys who have played in Europe trying to show how their games have matured and are NBA ready now. Thing is, the real business of the Summer League is European scouts looking at American talent they want to sign — that is where the majority of the Summer League players end up.

You get to see all this in a very intimate setting. The beauty of Summer League is that the fans (and media) are very close to the action. It’s like watching NBA talent in a high school gym. NBA coaches and general managers are sitting in the stands. You can’t buy a Coke without bumping into a scout. And the whole thing is casual.

A few things to watch for in Orlando:

* Evan Turner and Derrick Favors squaring off Monday night. Two of the top three picks are in action. (John Wall debuts Sunday night in Vegas.)

* Butler’s Gordan Hawyward — is he really ready for this level of play?

* Can Darius Miles convince anyone that his knees are good for another run in the NBA?

* Can Rod Benson finally get a fair shake? The guy has NBA game. But he’s a blogger, and Internet sensation. Like any good blogger, he’s candid. It hasn’t helped. NBA front offices react like the Unfrozen Caveman Lawyer — they are frightened by your new technology. Will they see past it to the fact Benson can flat out ball?

* Mustafa Shakur got a look from the Oklahoma City Thunder and he looked good — an athletic, long player who can explode to the rim. Isn’t Oklahoma City’s roster filled with guys like that? He gets the chance to prove he belongs.

You can watch most of the games on NBATV.com. Also, for $14.05 you can stream all the games on your computer through NBA.com.

(Programming note: The entire ProBasketballTalk team will be in Las Vegas for Summer League. Why? Because we’re hoops junkies. Flat out junkies. We’ll bring you the highlights from Orlando, as well.)