Tag: Robert Horry

Robert Horry

PBT Roundtable: Is Robert Horry a Hall of Famer?


In a new regular series, the PBT writers give their opinions on a question of the day. This week:

Is Robert Horry a Hall of Famer?

Kurt Helin: No. It’s not even really close for me. Robert Horry has one of my favorite playoff moments ever (sorry Kings fans) and he provided us plenty of thrills on his way to seven rings, but he was a role player. He’s a guy who had the fortune to be in the right place at the right time, plus he had ice water blood that let him hit big shots, but he’s also a guy who averaged 7 points a game over the course of his career, who had a career PER of 13.4. If — as there should be — there were an NBA Hall of Fame then we could highlight him in the corner about the biggest buzzer beaters in league history. But even in an NBA only Hall Horry doesn’t make the cut. The Hall is for the elite, and Horry was a good role player. Sorry.

Dan Feldman: No. No way. Horry deserves to make the Hall of Fame as much as Tom Sanders does. Who’s Tom Sanders? Exactly. Hall of Fames should honor players who had great careers, not just great moments. Horry had a good career and plenty of great moments, but without his Hall of Fame-level teammates, Horry never would have been position to make his big shots. Championships are a team accomplishment, and Horry played a role in seven. But making the Hall of Fame is an individual accomplishment, and Horry doesn’t come close to deserving it.

D.J. Foster: How about a yes for the Forrest Gump of basketball? Despite the uncomfortable amount of individual accolades to Horry’s name (no All-Star games, no All-NBA selections), you can’t deny the historical impact he had on the game. Ask yourself this: what does the league look like without him? How many titles swing another way? Do Sacramento and Phoenix get rings? Does the stretch 4 era really catch fire without Horry and his teams ushering it in? Maybe the butterfly effect shouldn’t have an impact on Hall of Fame decisions, but I think I’m okay with the Hall preserving performances and acknowledging an overall impact on the game instead of imposing certain statistical benchmarks.

Brett Pollakoff: While I would say no initially, it’s definitely not as cut and dry as “no way” or “absolutely not.” This is the basketball hall of fame, remember, and not simply the NBA’s version of where the immortal players of the game are enshrined. All types of questionable characters are inducted based on shaky contributions to the game at large, and I tend to lean more with D.J. here in that Horry’s being at the right place at the right time and coming through in the clutch on multiple, very important occasions deserves to be remembered by future generations.

Not just Nowitzki looking for redemption on Mavericks

Dallas Mavericks v Oklahoma City Thunder - Game Four

For a lot of fans, the image of Dirk Nowitzki kicking exercise equipment as he walked back to the locker room after Dwyane Wade, Shaquille O’Neal and the Miami Heat eliminated him and the Mavericks back in 2006 is easy to remember.

For many fans, these 2011 NBA finals are Nowtizki’s chance at redemption.

But the Mavericks are really a team of players looking for redemption.

This is Jason Kidd’s second chance — he went to the finals twice with the Nets, only to run into the Shaq/Kobe Lakers and lose. He is one of the best point guards ever, but he lacks a ring to complete it.

Jason Terry was there next to Nowitzki in 2006 falling short.

Shawn Marion was on a Suns team that was on its way to the finals, maybe more, until Robert Horry’s hip changed it all.

Peja Stojakovic was on a Kings team that that ran into Robert Horry too, with a 3-pointer with the Los Angeles Lakers (those same ones that caused Kidd so much trouble.)

Stojakovic also was on a Hornets team with Tyson Chandler (and Chris Paul) that was going to be the next big thing, until it wasn’t.

This is a veteran Mavericks team, and with that comes a lot of stories of woe. This is a chance for redemption for a lot of guys.

Nowitzki’s legacy should not depend on a ring. Nowitzki is the GEOAT — greatest European of all time. Name a better one? Make an argument for Pau Gasol. He has a couple of rings and is undoubtedly skilled, but he is not a franchise player like Nowtizki. Ask Memphis. What’s your other argument? Detlef Schrempf? Nobody has been as good as long from Europe as Nowitzki.

Kidd should be remembered as an all time great. Terry, Marion, Stojakovic and Chandler have all had great careers. A ring is not the sole measure of success.

But this could be sweet redemption for many Mavericks. Including Nowitzki.

Robert Horry thinks the NBA has become a soft "quarterback league"


Steve Nash was bloodied and injured, just another series for him against the San Antonio Spurs. Except this time it was an inadvertent Tim Duncan elbow that left him with an eye almost swollen shut.

That brought back memories of Robert Horry. He has gone in the minds of some from being “Big Shot Bob” to being “Cheap Shot Bob” after he hipchecked Nash in the 2007 NBA Western Conference Finals.

Think Horry regrets that? Think again, as he told XTRA 910 in Phoenix.

“When I came into the league that was just a normal foul in the playoffs. Now, I call it a quarterback league.

 “You know from that point on I was labeled ‘Big Cheap Shot.’  If you go back and look at the history of basketball it kind of changed.    If you hit guys now you get thrown out of the game.  It is the playoffs.  You play hard and you foul hard and make sure that people remember you so that deters them from going into the lane and going into the paint.  You can be remembered by one thing.  That is one of those things that I am infamous for is that foul on Steve Nash.  I told everybody that if it was anybody in the World other than Steve Nash, I wouldn’t be talked about right now.”