Tag: Rick Barry


Rick Barry’s youngest son shoots underhanded free throws while playing for College of Charleston (VIDEO)


Rick Barry played 14 seasons in both the ABA and NBA before being inducted into the basketball Hall of Fame in 1987. Part of his legacy was his unusual technique of shooting free throws underhanded, which had him finish his career third on the all-time list at a mark of 90 percent.

Barry has tried to impart his wisdom to players over the years, especially big men like Shaquille O’Neal and Dwight Howard who often times struggled to shoot north of 50 percent for an entire season.

They had no interest because they felt the style was embarrassing, but Barry’s youngest son, Canyon Barry, now a player at the College of Charleston, has no such inhibitions about using the underhanded shot to his advantage.

From Jeff Borzello of CBS Sports.com (via College Basketball Talk):

“It’s logic. If you have one of the greatest free throw shooters of all time, why wouldn’t you do it like that?” Canyon said on Tuesday.

Barry had five sons, but Canyon is the first to make the full-time move to shooting underhanded free throws.

“I always wanted to do that,” he said. “But it wasn’t until junior year of high school when I made the switch. The main problem is that you have to have big enough hands to grip the top of the ball. Why not give it a try, it was only a matter of time until my hands were big enough.”

And it’s working: a staff member at Charleston said Barry makes between 87 and 88 percent of his free throws.

Canyon Barry redshirted last season, and the video was taken from an exhibition played last November. It’ll be interesting to see the reception he gets from fans on the road, but as long as the shots continue to fall, it’s hardly going to matter.

Meet the new Basketball Hall of Famers: Jamaal Wilkes


Legendary Lakers broadcaster Chick Hearn used to call Jamaal Wilkes baseline jumper a “20-foot layup.” It was that automatic. Magic Johnson would drive the lane, kick it out and you knew it was two.

And that shot, with its eccentric form that would make Shawn Marion wince — Wilkes swung the ball behind his left ear and shot it from basically behind his head — was how we often remember Wilkes.

But he was a lot more than that. He was a great player on both ends of the floor seemingly always overshadowed by being on the team with some of the best and most flamboyant ever — Bill Walton in college at UCLA, Rick Berry first then Magic Johnson and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in the NBA. Wilkes never really drew attention to himself, on and off the court. His nickname was “Silk” because he was that smooth.

Pat Riley said Wilkes’ shot “was like snow falling off a bamboo leaf it was so smooth.” That would probably be the most poetic line Riley ever uttered, but it is true.

You never really noticed Wilkes during the game, yet you’d look up at the end and he’d have 25 points.

Look at it this way: When you talk about the great individual games every played Magic Johnson’s 1980s Game 6 in the NBA finals comes up — Magic scored 42 points and played all five positions that night, scoring 42 points with 15 rebounds and 7 assists leading the Lakers to the NBA title.

Wilkes had 37 points and 10 rebounds in that game, including 16 points in a crucial third quarter for the Lakers. But as always, he was crucial to the win but would be overshadowed in history.

He put up impressive career numbers in the NBA — 17.7 points and 6.2 points per game — but the accolades say why he is getting inducted: three-time NBA champion (one with Golden State, who drafted him No. 11 overall), three time NBA All-Star, NBA Rookie of the Year, two time NBA All-Defensive team member. And as the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame covers all levels of a person’s career we can throw in two-time NCAA All-American and three time NCAA champion.

Come this weekend, he will not be overshadowed. It is Wilkes deserved time in the spotlight. And in the basketball Hall of Fame.

Rick Barry thinks the players should fold, Hunter is disaster


This is why Rick Barry did not get the job as president of the National Basketball Players Association.

The Hall of Fame player and legendary Warrior thinks the players are basically powerless, need to fold and take the deal the owners offered. Really, he thinks the players should have taken the painful deal the owners offered months ago.

He is not alone, remember former No. 1 pick and Showtime Laker Mychal Thompson told us something similar. Here is exactly what Barry told KNBR in San Francisco, via Sports Radio Interviews.

“If I was still a player today I would be totally ticked off by the fact that we didn’t make a deal months ago. I really do believe that this could’ve been resolved and should’ve been resolved a long time ago. Why they always have to come down to this I don’t know. I’m not a big fan of Billy Hunter. I think Billy Hunter is one of the worst things that happened to the NBA. Yes he got them an unbelievable deal last time but he also was responsible for the lockout in the late 90’s which cost the players 1/3 of their salaries basically and got nothing for it. The same thing is happening here. What they’re doing is they’re making a situation which is a bad situation worse by standing firm. Standing firm for what? You’re standing firm to get nothing. All you’re trying to do is minimize the losses that you have to accept in order for there to be a deal put in place. The owners have made it perfectly clear they can’t survive with the way the deal was last time. I keep reading these statements ‘well we’re not going to give back what we fought so hard to get.’ Well what you got was more than you should’ve gotten. Accept it, lick your wounds, make a deal, take a little bit of a reduction.”

A lot of fans feel the same way, especially seeing a season teetering on the brink.

But the players don’t see it that way, and frankly if Barry were a player he would not either. Hunter and the system in place were good for the players and the league — the NBA has been its most popular when stars have dominated. See the Bulls and Jordan as example number one. And few players want to get rid of a guy who helped them make more money.

Although Barry is not thinking like a player. He’s thinking like Barry.