Tag: Rich Cho

LaMarcus Aldridge, Brandon Roy, Nicolas Batum, Rudy Fernandez, Gerald Wallace

Portland tasked with fixing what isn’t broken


Things are going just fine for the Portland Trail Blazers these days: LaMarcus Aldridge made “the leap,” last season, Rich Cho stole Gerald Wallace out of Charlotte with a bargain trade package, Andre Miller was replaced with a younger facsimile, Brandon Roy has shown signs of life, and the roster is loaded with capable contributors.

But then again, that’s exactly the problem: things are just fine for the Portland Trail Blazers, a team with plenty of talent and assets but no place in the top tier nor any straightforward means for significant improvement. The Blazers aren’t exactly locked into their current roster — they have plenty of movable parts — but the team already boasts good, productive players at every position. We know that Portland isn’t an elite team in every dimension of play, but they’ve reached a point where the acquisition of specific skills in order to rectify weaknesses could come at great expense to the overall talent level of the roster.

The Blazers are still without a GM (following Cho’s inexplicable firing), but whomever ends up taking the post will have their hands full. Improving an NBA team is always an arduous task, but elevating an already effective and versatile roster requires incredible finesse. There are too many considerations at this point to merely isolate the team’s weaknesses and go to work finding players that hold those skills. The outgoing talent in any potential trade (even if it’s only in the form of a relatively less essential cog) would likely be too considerable to deal without significant and immediate returns, and yet trades yielding equivalent talent for both parties typically only make sense when filling a positional need — of which the Blazers have none.

Portland could stand to have a bit more frontcourt depth, or really, could stand to have a healthy Greg Oden. But remove that supplementary need you’re left with a good team with so few “little,” moves to make. Elite squads are crafted from nuance, but this roster was already assembled with great attention to detail. They were on the right path with all of the crucial ingredients, but then Roy fell, Oden false started (and false started, and false started…), and the electricity dissipated.  The Blazers still hold all of the components, but something’s amiss in the current.

How does one rectify that problem? How does a GM with a glut of components fix the team’s flow without sacrificing that which generates its power?

It’s hard to say — I’m no electrician. But I’m unconvinced that the problem is a lack of star power. Aldridge is productive enough to act as a team’s primary offensive weapon. He’s that good, and lest we forget, the Dallas Mavericks recently concluded their demonstrative campaign to prove that the one-star model can be effective in the right context. Would Portland benefit from somehow turning Raymond Felton, Nicolas Batum, or Wesley Matthews into a more productive player? Surely. But I remain unconvinced that a lack of a true second fiddle is what dooms the Blazers. They could win with a more cumulative approach, but just don’t seem to have the right amalgamation of overall production and talent. The offensive and defensive potential are there, but the optimal result, for whatever reason, isn’t.

The answers are out there for the Blazers and their GM-to-be, but here’s a hope that the rush to find those answers takes a back seat to an enduring patience. Portland only gets one shot at this. They only have so many pieces that can be dealt and so much cap space to work with. Plus, with a newly implemented CBA, they’ll have entirely new rules and stipulations to consider. It may seem like there’s a swiftly ticking clock, but Aldridge, Wallace, Felton, Matthews, Batum, and even Roy have plenty of productive years ahead of them. There’s a window here, but also a problem worthy of careful analysis and creative thinking. There’s no rush. The evolution from good to great takes time and persistence, and the worst thing that could come of the Blazers’ season is a faulty move made by a new manager looking to make an immediate imprint.

Report: Trail Blazers to restart GM search from square one

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At some point, the Portland Trail Blazers are going to need a general manager. And if that time is sooner rather than later, well, they are in trouble.

More than four months after the Trail Blazers started their search for a new general manager after firing Rich Cho, after interviews with at least four candidates, the team is restarting the process. They are going back to square one.

So reports the Oregonian.

A league source said the Blazers have decided against hiring any of the candidates they have interviewed to date and that Blazers president Larry Miller spent Thursday calling them to relay the news they were no longer being considered for the job.

The Blazers have compiled a new list of candidates, with a strong emphasis on people with extensive general manager experience, and will, essentially, restart the search.

That means former Warriors GM Chris Mullin, current Clippers GM Neil Olshey, Thunder executive Troy Weaver and Spurs executive Dennis Lindsey are out of the running.

Reportedly on that new list is current 76ers GM Ed Stefanski and former Hornets GM Jeff Bower.

The problem in getting them remains the Blazers track record — they fired two good and well respected GMs in Kevin Pritchard and Rich Cho within 10 month of each other. In both cases reportedly because they didn’t mesh well enough with owner Paul Allen, not because of how well they did their jobs. Then a four month search that led nowhere. This looks from the outside like a team in front office disarray.

So if you are head hunted for this job, you are going to be hesitant. You’ll want to know what you are really getting yourself into. And you’ll want assurances.

This isn’t the first rodeo for Stefanski and Bower (or others with GM experience) so they will be cautious.

Meanwhile, if the lockout does end soon, interim GM Chad Buchanan will be the man during the free agent frenzy. He will make decisions about whether to use the amnesty provision on Brandon Roy and how to restructure a team with some real talent but who was built to have Roy as a cornerstone.

Then whomever they hire as GM eventually will have to live with Buchanan’s decisions. Although part of the issue may be they are not his decisions, but rather come from above him.

Blazers searching Cho’s replacement as GM

Rich Cho
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From CBS’ Ben Golliver:

PORTLAND, Ore. — More than 100 days after “parting ways” with former GM Rich Cho weeks before the 2011 NBA Draft, the PortlandTrail Blazers have yet to hire Cho’s full-time replacement.

Blazers president Larry Miller did finally confirm that the GM search process has progressed in a telephone interview with CBSSports.com on Monday.

“We have talked to and interviewed some candidates,” Miller said. “I’m not going to mention any names but we have interviewed candidates.”

Yahoo Sports has reported that the Blazers are eying Oklahoma CityThunder executive Troy Weaver, San Antonio Spurs executive Dennis Lindsey and former Golden State Warriors executive Chris Mullin, while ESPN.com added Cleveland Cavaliers executive David Griffin and Los Angeles Clippers executive Neil Olshey to the list.

The Blazers’ front office has been a soap opera in recent years — hopefully the Blazers can find someone to hold down the GM job successfully this off-season and spare Blazer fans from any future front-office drama.