Tag: Rich Cho

Rich Cho

Charlotte’s scouting database is better than yours. Way better.


Bobcats GM Rich Cho comes at his job differently than the other 29 guys who have these gigs. Cho was an engineer for Boeing who left that to attend Pepperdine law school, then parlayed that into a job with the Sonics.

One of his big projects with the Bobcats has been create a comprehensive player data base that revolutionizes how the franchise can research players. At the heart of that database are changes in how the Bobcats evaluate their talent and scout other players. The Charlotte Observer as a fantastic look at it. It took six months, six figures and three full-time people to put the database together.

It’s going to be put to the test in the next few weeks as the Bobcats head into the first draft under Cho, followed by a free agency period where the team will try to rebuild a roster that was a historically bad 7-59 last season.

This scouting database was put in a secure online place and has more than 50,000 pages, reports the Observer.

You can instantly look up year-by-year statistics for Boston Celtics great Bill Russell … or any other player in NBA history. You can check the injury archive of a Slovenian playing in the Spanish league or whether a forward in the Development League was ever busted for drugs….

Cho’s system has all the basics you’d expect: Player contracts, statistics that can be used to compare Bobcats players’ development to others’, any potential bonuses that could complicate trade discussions.

That’s all handy, but thanks to a number of invaluable Web sites — Basketball-Reference, DraftExpress and more — you and I also can find that information. The Bobcats database makes it more convenient, but it’s not unheard of information.

What separates it is how Cho used this to change how the Bobcats do their scouting reports (all of which also is on the database).

(Cho) didn’t like the standard practice of rating a player’s shooting or dribbling 1 through 10, because one scout’s eight was another scout’s six. So he came up with a nine-level system with labels, descriptions and examples, for scouts to use as a guide. The rankings: Franchise, Core, Top starter, Starter, Key reserve, Reserve, Roster, Minor-league, No-Bobcat.

There are fewer than 10 current NBA players graded as “franchise.” As Cho described, “we’re talking about players who can change the caliber of a team.” At the other end, Cho describes a “No-Bobcat” as a player whose talent falls far short of NBA-caliber or who’s behavior is so egregious it can’t be tolerated.

Go read the entire story. This alone certainly will not change the fortunes of the Bobcats — it’s a tool, and in the end what really matters is your skill in using that tool. There were guys with a hammer and a chisel that created chairs 300 years ago that are works of art and still function today, there are guys today with laser cutting lines on power saws that create schlock. The tools alone are not enough.

But it’s a step. It’s building a foundation that can help make better decisions, and that’s where turning the Bobcats around starts.

There is support out there for Bobcats new coach Dunlap

Mike Dunlap

In all the stories about the Charlotte Bobcats coaching search, we at PBT dutifully listed Mike Dunlap, assistant coach at St. Johns, among the guys interviewed. Like you, we thought that a courtesy interview because he knew somebody, he was not a guy on most people’s NBA radar.

But he got the job.

And while we questioned the hire — in part because Dunlap is an unknown quantity, in part because the Bobcats named three finalists then hired outside that circle, in part because of the rumors they were trying to hire on the cheap — there has been support coming up for him from other coaches. Most notably Nuggets head man George Karl, who had Dunlap as an assistant for years. Here is what Karl tweeted (yes, Karl is on twitter):

Great hire by Bobcats! Mike Dunlap is one of the most creative defensive minds I’ve ever worked with. Welcome back to the NBA!

The other book on Dunlap is that he is good at player development, therefor is a fit for the young and rebuilding Bobcats (or at least that is the direction they should be going).

Maybe. Honestly nobody knows how he will do as a coach and while this is a gamble Dunlap gets a chance. He, like every other coach in this league, will be judged based on wins and losses (relative to expectations). Do well, help the team grow and evolve, and he stays. It’s not a complex equation.

But the way it went down was still very Bobcats. Why interview three guys as finalists — Jerry Sloan, Brian Shaw and Quin Snyder — then hire outside that circle? Who knows? Bottom line Michael Jordan and Rich Cho you have your guy, good luck with him. He’s your gamble now.

Report: Trail Blazers to “pause” search for general manager

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Eventually, the Portland Trail Blazers will need a general manager to tell Paul Allen everything is great figure out how to rebuild this team and win fast.

But with the lockout dragging on, that time is not now.

The Blazers have already reset their search to replace Rich Cho once and now the search will be put on hold, according to Joe Freeman of the Oregonian. Here are a series of tweets from him.

According to an NBA source with knowledge of the Trail Blazers’ thinking, the team has decided to “pause” their search for a new GM.

“To go out and spend a bunch of money on a high-paying GM job doesn’t make sense right now,” the source said… “With what has happened the last week or so (in the lockout), it made a lot of sense to put the search on pause.”

If you’re looking for the positive spin, not spending money on a GM means the franchise can keep on more people in the organization as they try to get through the lockout. A lockout that hardline Blazers owner Paul Allen has helped drag out, but let’s not go there.

Portland has let go of two respected GMs — Kevin Pritchard and Cho — after the last two seasons, making some candidates hesitant. The Blazers also denied reaching out to Mavs GM Donnie Nelson or Utah GM Kevin O’Conner. I would say you can reach out to someone via back channels and not formally talk to them, but really that is moot. The pause button has been hit.

Portland tasked with fixing what isn’t broken

LaMarcus Aldridge, Brandon Roy, Nicolas Batum, Rudy Fernandez, Gerald Wallace

Things are going just fine for the Portland Trail Blazers these days: LaMarcus Aldridge made “the leap,” last season, Rich Cho stole Gerald Wallace out of Charlotte with a bargain trade package, Andre Miller was replaced with a younger facsimile, Brandon Roy has shown signs of life, and the roster is loaded with capable contributors.

But then again, that’s exactly the problem: things are just fine for the Portland Trail Blazers, a team with plenty of talent and assets but no place in the top tier nor any straightforward means for significant improvement. The Blazers aren’t exactly locked into their current roster — they have plenty of movable parts — but the team already boasts good, productive players at every position. We know that Portland isn’t an elite team in every dimension of play, but they’ve reached a point where the acquisition of specific skills in order to rectify weaknesses could come at great expense to the overall talent level of the roster.

The Blazers are still without a GM (following Cho’s inexplicable firing), but whomever ends up taking the post will have their hands full. Improving an NBA team is always an arduous task, but elevating an already effective and versatile roster requires incredible finesse. There are too many considerations at this point to merely isolate the team’s weaknesses and go to work finding players that hold those skills. The outgoing talent in any potential trade (even if it’s only in the form of a relatively less essential cog) would likely be too considerable to deal without significant and immediate returns, and yet trades yielding equivalent talent for both parties typically only make sense when filling a positional need — of which the Blazers have none.

Portland could stand to have a bit more frontcourt depth, or really, could stand to have a healthy Greg Oden. But remove that supplementary need you’re left with a good team with so few “little,” moves to make. Elite squads are crafted from nuance, but this roster was already assembled with great attention to detail. They were on the right path with all of the crucial ingredients, but then Roy fell, Oden false started (and false started, and false started…), and the electricity dissipated.  The Blazers still hold all of the components, but something’s amiss in the current.

How does one rectify that problem? How does a GM with a glut of components fix the team’s flow without sacrificing that which generates its power?

It’s hard to say — I’m no electrician. But I’m unconvinced that the problem is a lack of star power. Aldridge is productive enough to act as a team’s primary offensive weapon. He’s that good, and lest we forget, the Dallas Mavericks recently concluded their demonstrative campaign to prove that the one-star model can be effective in the right context. Would Portland benefit from somehow turning Raymond Felton, Nicolas Batum, or Wesley Matthews into a more productive player? Surely. But I remain unconvinced that a lack of a true second fiddle is what dooms the Blazers. They could win with a more cumulative approach, but just don’t seem to have the right amalgamation of overall production and talent. The offensive and defensive potential are there, but the optimal result, for whatever reason, isn’t.

The answers are out there for the Blazers and their GM-to-be, but here’s a hope that the rush to find those answers takes a back seat to an enduring patience. Portland only gets one shot at this. They only have so many pieces that can be dealt and so much cap space to work with. Plus, with a newly implemented CBA, they’ll have entirely new rules and stipulations to consider. It may seem like there’s a swiftly ticking clock, but Aldridge, Wallace, Felton, Matthews, Batum, and even Roy have plenty of productive years ahead of them. There’s a window here, but also a problem worthy of careful analysis and creative thinking. There’s no rush. The evolution from good to great takes time and persistence, and the worst thing that could come of the Blazers’ season is a faulty move made by a new manager looking to make an immediate imprint.

Report: Trail Blazers to restart GM search from square one

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At some point, the Portland Trail Blazers are going to need a general manager. And if that time is sooner rather than later, well, they are in trouble.

More than four months after the Trail Blazers started their search for a new general manager after firing Rich Cho, after interviews with at least four candidates, the team is restarting the process. They are going back to square one.

So reports the Oregonian.

A league source said the Blazers have decided against hiring any of the candidates they have interviewed to date and that Blazers president Larry Miller spent Thursday calling them to relay the news they were no longer being considered for the job.

The Blazers have compiled a new list of candidates, with a strong emphasis on people with extensive general manager experience, and will, essentially, restart the search.

That means former Warriors GM Chris Mullin, current Clippers GM Neil Olshey, Thunder executive Troy Weaver and Spurs executive Dennis Lindsey are out of the running.

Reportedly on that new list is current 76ers GM Ed Stefanski and former Hornets GM Jeff Bower.

The problem in getting them remains the Blazers track record — they fired two good and well respected GMs in Kevin Pritchard and Rich Cho within 10 month of each other. In both cases reportedly because they didn’t mesh well enough with owner Paul Allen, not because of how well they did their jobs. Then a four month search that led nowhere. This looks from the outside like a team in front office disarray.

So if you are head hunted for this job, you are going to be hesitant. You’ll want to know what you are really getting yourself into. And you’ll want assurances.

This isn’t the first rodeo for Stefanski and Bower (or others with GM experience) so they will be cautious.

Meanwhile, if the lockout does end soon, interim GM Chad Buchanan will be the man during the free agent frenzy. He will make decisions about whether to use the amnesty provision on Brandon Roy and how to restructure a team with some real talent but who was built to have Roy as a cornerstone.

Then whomever they hire as GM eventually will have to live with Buchanan’s decisions. Although part of the issue may be they are not his decisions, but rather come from above him.