Tag: RetroBall


RetroBall: Knicks-Pacers ’95, the night of the finger roll


Since billionaire owners and millionaire players are bitterly divided over how much money they’ll be splitting over the coming years and have locked us out of actual basketball to talk about, PBT will be regaling you this summer  with RetroBall. Using the advanced powers of the internet and NBATV, we’ll bring you interesting stories from years gone by. If nothing else, it will provide us an opportunity to make fun of fashion and culture from the past, which is always a giggle. We continue our series today with Pacers-Knicks, Game 7 of the 1995 NBA Playoffs.

It was one of the greatest rivalries that was lost for too long in the glow of the Jordan era. Until the “30 for 30” documentary “Winning Time,” centered around the 8 points, 9 seconds event (it wasn’t a game, it was an event; it happened to you, one way or another),  it was really far too forgotten. But man, these two hated each other. Miller always jabbing in everyone’s ear, including Spike Lee, the numerous choke references, the incredible shooting, Rik Smits vs. Ewing. Mark Jackson, Anthony Mason, Charles Oakley, Derrick McKey. It was a genuine blood rivalry. And this series gave us two incredibly even matched teams that both were honestly worthy of the title, had Olajuwon not gone all “Contra-code” on us.

Going into Game 7, the Knicks had actually out-scored the Pacers 568-556 in the series. But three of the games had come down to less than a three point differential. The Knicks had momentum. The Pacers had Reggie Miller. The Knicks had home court. The Pacers had Rik Smits’ mustache. And everything would come down to a finger roll. What follows are my observations from watching the game for the first time since I was 13.

  • The opening lineups are preceded by four of the Knicks, including Anthony Mason, smashing into each other in a combination of chest bumps and shoves. It looks violent. Like pretty much everything involving Anthony Mason.
  • Go New York, go New York, go!” is on the intros. Nice. Revel in it, Big Apple.
  • Good to know Pat Riley has the same expression he’s had on his face for the last fifteen years. Last time the man smiled was after the Lakers’ last title with him.
  • Ewing up and under Smits from short-range. One step and a right handed leaner. That’s pretty amazing stuff. This is going to be one of those games that everyone blocks out when they’re talking about how overrated Patrick Ewing was. Well, okay, not really because of the final shot of the game. But we’ll get there.
  • Charles Smith is strutting on his first made basket which makes the score 4-2. Yeesh. He and Nate Robinson should go bowling.
  • You know how if you run off a 3-point shooter and make him take a pull-up J from mid-range, it’s supposed to be a good thing? With Miller you’ve just saved yourself a point. which is great, but his ability to make it is still incredible. Especially when he somehow shoots it where it goes straight up, down through the net and nearly right back to him if no one had grabbed it. It’s like the magic bullet, only it makes John Starks look stupid. (COUGH* HALL OF FAME* COUGH)
  • Charles Smith winds up with a 25% usage rate in this game and only scores 12 points. How is that possible if he only shot the ball nine ti… oh, four turnovers. Yeah, that’ll do it in 27 minutes. This is another one of those games where a guy starts out hot and then thinks it stays with him. He hits his first two, then goes 3-7  the rest of the way.
  • Smits turns immediately on the catch for the jump hook. Ewing blocks it, which is kind of insane. The timing on that is difficult, the positioning on that is difficult, the extension on that is difficult.
  • Rik Smits is TOTALLY going to attack Charles Oakley on the drive. Next time. For real.
  • Watching Ewing’s one-handed push hook makes you slam your head into a wall wondering why Dwight hasn’t picked it up.
  • Smits’ movement working in the post with his passer is really impressive. You see a ton today of it just being guys wrestling, having it come down to size. Smits teases Ewing into trying to front him all the way out to the elbow, and then when he catches the lob is already squaring up on the turn to go baseline. Also, if you look at Rik Smits’ dunk and Pau Gasol’s dunk they’re going to look identical.
  • Ewing takes the exact opposite approach. Instead of moving him space, Ewing uses his body to measure where Smits is at to take the corner. Pretty.
  • Jackson with a great pass you don’t see too often, break outlet from top of the key far side to the elbow, a nice soft lob to Miller who two-steps out of it into a pull-up jumper. Normally I would grind my teeth at a PUJIT like that,  but it’s Miller, so, you know, not a bad plan. Hey, maybe MJax can teach that to Curry so he can thread it to Mont…oh, right.
  • Haywoode Workman has replaced Mark Jackson. There. That’s the joke.
  • Mason leans so much when he runs the floor, he’s a foul magnet. He leans hard on one side and then reverses and the other guy slips like he had his chair pulled out, and it looks like a foul. Smart stuff. Artest does the same thing now.
  • Miller goes up, and through Starks and scores on a pull-up jumper. It’s sick. It’s one thing to be awesome at creating space to get your shot. Miller just shoots through it. (COUGH* HALL OF FAME* COUGH)
  • Starks drives and lands in the cameras, but hits the floor first. So he jumps, lands, steps, then falls into the cameras. Put some brakes on those shoes, kid!
  • Every close-up of Starks makes me want to pat him on the head and say “You poor, poor man.”
  • Reggie goes baseline off-ball screen, loops off the back screen at the block, catch-and-shoot at the elbow at full speed, stops on a dime, and the net barely moves as he hits again. We have our first Marv Albert “Reggie Miller… ON FIRE!” of the night. (COUGH* HALL OF FAME* COUGH)
  • Haywoode Workman played ball in Israel, Italy, Topeka, Indiana, Washington, and Milwaukee. He’s a ref now, and his middle name is Wilvon. There ought to be a book.
  • Pacers start to get their double-teams moving on a string and the Knicks are trying to out-pass it. Can’t outrun the radio, my dad always said. I don’t know if that’s relevant here, but it sounds folksy.
  • Hey, you think Anthony Bonner and Matt Bonner are related? … What?
  • Is there a way for me to say that Rik Smits has tricky hips without it sounding odd? No? Okay.
  • Smits hits a spot-up baseline J, fading left from the left baseline. Yikes.
  • The Knicks had so many guys that when they made shots you couldn’t believe it. Harper splits a double team, double-clutches, and hits glass from 8 feet. Okay.
  • Smith drives his elbow through Byron Scott’s face working through a screen. Today that’s a flagrant foul.
  • MJax dribbled so far out in front of him, it was like he was yo-yoing it.
  • Derrick McKey really wants to play in the post in this game.
  • Is it strange to anyone else that this Knicks team was a bad offensive rebounding team? Want one to blow our mind? The Anthony Mason-Patrick Ewing- Charles Smith 95 Knicks ranked 23rd in offensive rebounding percentage (percentage of available OREBs grabbed). This year’s Knicks team with Amar’e Stoudemire, Ronny Turiaf and Timofey Mozgov for only half a year? 24th. One spot.
  • Pacers are moving in this game. The Knicks are taking a lot of mid-range jumpers, leading to long rebounds, which the Pacers are getting, and that’s sparking the break.
  • Starks swarms Miller on a catch, forces a turnover, then throws a spinning overhead outlet to Smith for an easy dunk.
  • Oakley with a Z-Bound. Sorry. Couldn’t help myself.
  • You’ll be happy to know that immediately following this game is the NBA Draft Lottery, where the Golden State Warriors will win and select Joe Smith. Who is still playing. Good God, Joe Smith is old.
  • Miller misses a technical free throw. My world tilted sideways for a minute just watching that.
  • Charles Smith turns the ball over on consecutive possessions and the Pacers get zero points out of two consecutive fast break ops. Yeesh.
  • Miller heaves up a desperation shot at the end of the shot clock, airball, controversy over whether it hit the rim or not, refs have to jump ball it. Remember when there was no other option? Larry Brown is apoplectic, going nuts on the sideline. I miss when Larry Brown would still do that. Now he just does the grin and headshake. Get excited, Minnesota!
  • Brown is opting to leave Smits off the floor for most of the second. It’s one of those “if you lose you look like a moron” things. Larry Drew nods his head.
  • Byron Scott trying to guard Oakley on a lob. Yeah, good luck with that, Coach.
  • Ewing with 17, Miller with 18 at the half. High scoring, fast-pace game. The late 90’s had not yet arrived.
  • Starks torches Miller to the rim. I really wanted Mark Jackson to have been guarding him so I could make a “hand down, man down” joke.
  • The Knicks come undone a little bit to start the third with fouls and turnovers. Ewing actually barks at Starks for passing to Smith who screws up a fast break. And that kind of sums up John Starks’ life this season.
  • Charles Smith just dove at the rim. Anthony Randolph thinks he should slow it down. Tyrus Thomas thought that was raw. Ron Artest found it impetuous. Other jokes.
  • Charles Smith stabs another possession in the face and leaves it to die in the desert.
  • There’s 8:34 to go in the third when Smith finally hits a jumper. He has 12. Guess how many points he ends up with?
  • Mark Jackson hustled his face off. I can’t even make fun of his catch phrases in this game because he’s working so hard. Walk the walk.
  • Oakley takes Smits for a possession to keep Ewing out of foul trouble. Smits moves to the face up, Oakley bites on it, and Smits goes right around him with those wonky hips of his. Sideways jam.
  • The Pacers decide that not closing out the baseline and allowing the Knicks to force Smits’ fourth foul is a great plan. This is flawed thinking. You know what’s not flawed? Smits’ mustache.
  • source:
  • Miller. Jab-step, step-back 3. Sweet Bejesus. (COUGH* HALL OF FAME* COUGH)
  • Starks misses a three, Miller leaks out in transition, the Knicks realize it too late, bang, and the staredown of Spike Lee. (COUGH* HALL OF FAME* COUGH)
  • How did any Knicks fan have any nails left on their fingers with Starks running point? His decision making reverts to “drunken toddler” mode half the time.
  • Harper with a HUGE three out of a double-team. He was 3 of 4 in this game, and they needed all 9 of those points.
  • Brown doesn’t keep Smits out deep into the fourth, and Smits picks up his fifth. Life for the Knicks.
  • Can’t say enough about the Garden crowd. Incredible energy on every play.
  • Ewing shake and bake left baseline, makes it one-point game. That’s 24 for Ewing.
  • Hubert Davis hits one shot in this game. It’s to tie the game late in the fourth.
  • The Knicks were really good on their rotations at pushing the drive to where they wanted it to go, which was often behind the backboard.
  • Unfortunately, they’re not so good with stopping the double-split, as Miller slices it, then dishes to Smits for a J.
  • Harper gives Davis a very Artest-like flagrant, which is both arms slapping and driving forward into the body. Probably not a flagrant, but it’s called as such. Would definitely be called as such today.
  • Off the flagrant possession, Smits hits a sweeping hook. It’s seven points with 3:07 to go.
  • Ewing’s final bucket comes on an elbow spot-up jumper with less than three minutes to go.
  • Look at how nice Spike Lee looks!
  • source:  Oakley with a perfect weakside recovery to reject Smits. There is life.
  • Smits goes to the line after blown coverage on the inbounds. Yes, the inbounds. Mason thinks he got all ball, and it looks like it. Tough.
  • Ewing gets everything but the bucket on the turnaround, but Mason cleans up.
  • Seriously, you guys, Rik Smits was a big deal there for a few years. Clutch face-up jumper with 1:18 to go. It will be the last time the Pacers score in this game.
  • Mason misses a key free throw. Going to be a dead puppy later. Misses another. Lots of dead puppies in New York that night.
  • Miller tries to bury the dagger off the catch and shoot and instead gives a fast break to the Knicks, but…
  • Mason gets the ball on a fast break, and missed the dunk. But Starks, in typical Starks fashion, hits a huge 3 shot to close.
  • Mark Jackson works the clock too long, gives to Smits who’s smothered, so he gives the ball back to Jackson, who has to shoot. But you know what? HAND UP… er… uh… crap.
  • You’re ready for torture, yes, Knicks fans?
  • source:
  • The red is the cylinder. The orange is the ball. It was perfect. Ewing moves up and under to get to the right, the help defender is slow and hesitant to foul, it’s a wide-open finger-roll and everything changes…
  • Back iron.
  • Ball game.
  • That’s how it goes in this league.

RetroBall: Rockets-Lakers ’07 and the night Yao stood too tall for Kobe

Houston Rockets v Los Angeles Lakers

Since billionaire owners and millionaire players are bitterly divided over how much money they’ll be splitting over the coming years and have locked us out of actual basketball to talk about, PBT will be regaling you this summer on the weekends with RetroBall. Using the advanced powers of the internet and NBATV, we’ll bring you interesting stories from years gone by. If nothing else, it will provide us an opportunity to make fun of fashion and culture from the past, which is always a giggle.

This week we bring you a reflection on the Ming Dynasty. With the announcement of Yao Ming’s retirement a little over a week ago, and with the fanfare substantially muted on account of the league being unable (unwilling) to discuss the players and give Yao his due, we wanted to pay tribute. I elected to go with an overtime classic against the Lakers, a 107-104 Overtime win for the Rockets where Yao dropped 39 points (on 18 shots), 11 rebounds, and 4 blocks.

Oh, and the fact that Kobe Bryant dropped 53 points (on 44 shots!) wasn’t a bad incentive either.

2006-2007 was an interesting year for both men. Yao was returning from one of his many injuries; he only played 48 games that season. But in the games he played in, he averaged 25 points and 9.4 rebounds per game, with 2 assists and 2 blocks. He posted his career high in PER of 26.5. It was during the McGrady-Yao era, but before they made upgrades to make a run in 2007-2008, and 2008-2009. And still, the Rockets won 52 games, securing the five seed. If it hadn’t been for those pesky Utah Jazz, they would have got away with it, too. But then, that’s the legacy of the mid-00’s Rockets. “If it hadn’t been for…”

Meanwhile, this is the era of the Lakers team Lakers fans turn to as proof of Kobe Bryant’s greatness and the reminder of how things weren’t always as halcyon as they are now. It is the Smush Parker era. The Kwame Brown era. The Luke Walton Is Starting, For God’s Sake Era. The Lakers would somehow drag themselves to the playoffs, and face the Phoenix Suns who they nearly toppled the year before. Yeah, not so much. But in the middle of that, there’s Kobe Bryant during the best pure offensive stretch of his career.

On March 30th, 2007, in the midst of their playoff pushes, the two teams met in Los Angeles. What follows are my observations from watching the game.

  • And we’re off, with Joel Meyers and Snapper Jones, marking his third straight appearance in RetroBall broadcasts. The man’s everywhere. Your starting lineups. For the Lakers, Smush Parker (giggle), Kobe Bryant, Luke Walton (guffaw), Lamar Odom, and Kwame Brown (chuckle). For the Rockets, Rafer Alston, Shane Battier, Tracy McGrady, Chuck Hayes, and Yao Ming.
  • First Lakers possession is a Smush Parker double-clutch airball. And we’re off!
  • What’s striking about the two teams isn’t the offense, but the defense. The Lakers’ help defense is an abject nightmare. Whether that’s personnel (what everyone wants to pin it on), or the level of interest Phil Jackson had in coaching this group is unclear. Either way, the problem isn’t a Raptors-like laziness, but instead over-commitment as the double is too reactive, too eager, which leads to a boatload of buckets from Houston on easy dump off passes for layups. Houston on the other hand, coached by Jeff Van Gundy, is smart with where it sends guys. When they over-commit, it’s strategic, a tactical decision to not let X player beat you, but instead to allow Y. This is in large part why Kwame Brown winds up with 15 points in this game.
  • Side note: Kwame was pretty terrible in this time frame, as he has been for the majority of his career, but the work he’s done with Charlotte was overlooked this season, and his effort here today shows signs of it. He’s got the willpower, and the athleticism, just not the head on his shoulders. On the list of guys who let down the Lakers in this loss, Kwame’s actually not on the list. He arguably had a better game than Lamar Odom.
  • Bryant immediately realizes it’s going to be yet another one of “those games” and goes to work. McGrady plays pretty decent defense on the left wing, forcing him right, which is where Battier is coming for help. Bryant pulls up at the elbow just as Battier commits to contesting the shot. Nails it. Yikes.
  • A few minutes later, Bryant inbounds, then uses the posted Odom to screen his man, goes back underneath it, catches and squares up. This is the first of many instances where you wonder what in God’s name Kirk Snyder (who inexplicably guards Bryant for a vast section of the first half) is doing as he backs off to contain the drive, giving Kobe Bryant a pull-up J. Boom.
  • You know what’s cute? How much Tracy McGrady (30 points on 24 shots, 29 percent) wants to get into a shooting match with Bryant. It’s pretty apparent that Tracy thinks this is going to be Nique vs. Bird. Yao Ming is shaking his head like a bobblehead. Miraculously, he is not injured trying to shove his foot up McGrady’s backside.
  • McGrady does get aggressive for a bucket as he blows past Bryant like he’s standing still. Kobe yells for help from Odom, but Odom’s late on his rotation (this will be a theme), and McGrady lays it in at the rim, a reminder of how much ups McGrady had at this point. Kobe gives Odom the glare you may have seen from such films as “the 2008 Finals” and “the Dallas Mavericks disaster.”
  • This would be a good point to note that Luke Walton started for this team. Actually started. Luke Walton, starting forward for the Los Angeles Lakers. THE Los Angeles Lakers started Luke Walton. Yeah, Mitch Kupchak is and always has been a genius. That’s right.
  • Perfect example of the good and bad of Kwame. The Rockets run underneath screens twice and back, and in the ensuing chaos, Brown leaves his man, Yao Ming, the 7-6 All-Star, to chase Shane Battier rolling away from the basket, and away from the ball to short range. Easy entry pass, Yao capitalizes. D’oh.
  • Kwame’s actual man defense on Yao starts out pretty well. He guards his “sweet spot shot,” as Snapper puts it, extremely well, closing off the middle of the lane, and jumping off his baseline foot to contest the baby face-up jumper. He also goes over the top to deny an entry pass. By the end of the first half, however, Yao’s gets his feel for Brown and starts to adjust his spacing to draw fouls.  Which he does to the tune of five fouls on Brown and 21 free throws total. As a metaphor for Yao’s game, he doesn’t dominate Brown or fill up the highlight reel. It’s a war of attrition, and Yao’s size and touch is simply too much for the Lakers to overcome. But we’ll get there.
  • We’re back to the bad part of Kwame. After denying that entry pass, on the next possession, he gambles by rushing the ball handler (John Lucas), and momentarily forces the steal. Brown immediately sprints out to get out in transition for a bucket. Unfortunately, the Rockets retain possession, Lucas swings to Battier on the wing, Odom jumps out to contest the open three, which means guess who’s open underneath the basket with only Kobe Bryant nearby? Yeah, the 7-6 guy again. Two more for Yao.
  • Even in 2007, Luke Walton is trying to cherry pick.
  • Bryant scores eight of the Lakers’ first 10 points. None of them are layups. I’ve seen the guy make thousands of these shots and it still leaves your jaw hanging to watch him work offensively. The patience, the deliberate nature, the fingersnap-quick attack. It’s a dazzling display… which of course leaves Kobe with an even quicker finger trigger than normal.
  • Considering that Bryant winds up shooting 44 times in this game (44 times!), you’d think it had to be his highest FGA game of his career. Nope. Tied for fourth highest. He shot an equal or higher number of times five times in his career. Cue Kevin Harlan. “With no regard for human efficiency!”
  • It was about time for the good Lamar Odom side to show up. Odom dribbles all the way to the baseline, forcing Yao to commit, leaving Kwame. A nice over the top dump-off to Odom over his man gives Kwame a layup through the back side of Yao. Kwame Brown, scoring machine.
  • You can talk a lot about Kwame Brown’s failures. But it’s important that we document the following:
  • Immediately following this, Yao posts in the center of the lane, establishes  position, receives the ball and draws a foul on Kwame. This happens on two of Brown’s five fouls; Yao immediately targets Brown after he scores. As if to say “Okay, that’s nice, but no, seriously, I’m much better than you.”
  • Really, when you think about it, Smush Parker missed PUJIT (Pull-Up Jumpers In Transition) 3s are the best PUJIT 3s.
  • The trick with Yao was to get him into a position where the rebound was predicated by covering distance, not position and timing. His frame couldn’t support him pogo-ing, which means if you skyrocketed up like Odom does several times, you can snatch offensive rebounds.
  • No wonder Laker fans think Shane Battier is overrated defensively. Luke Walton scored on him once. That’s enough for most people.
  • Watching the defensive effort of McGrady in this game compared to each season after is stunning. The effort level really is pretty high, even if it’s not nearly intelligent enough. If only he’d listened to Battier some.
  • Weird to see the success Kwame has in getting Yao out of the lane and facing him up, then taking him off the dribble. Makes you wonder what would have happened if Brown had landed somewhere that had him lose weight and become a stretch F/C.
  • I understand hating Rafer Alston is very popular, and that my reticence about the deal that sent Alston for Kyle Lowry looks monumentally stupid, but Alston has a spectacular play in the second quarter. Off the steal, Rafer takes a mid-court pick, and gets Luke Walton on skates, goes “Skip to My Lou” on him, then no-look passes to a cutting Yao for a slam. If you’re the Lakers, my question is this. How do you not hear the 7-6 Chinese guy coming? That phrase “heard footsteps?” It was invented for situations just like this.
  • And Juwan Howard is here! Juwan Howard is the Steve Buscemi of the NBA. He just pops up everywhere you look in little bit parts.
  • When Kwame completely bobbles a wide-open, great look from Walton, I think “Oh, he Joel Anthony’d it.” Then I realize, based on the space-time continuum, in reality, Joel Anthony “Kwame Brown’d it.”
  • Kobe has 16 with 10:24 to go in the half. As crazy as 16 points in 13:36 is, he winds up scoring 37 more in the final 39:24.
  • Having Bryant out there every single play has to exhaust the defense. The Rockets relax for a second, on a simple swing pass to Bryant who faces up baseline. Before they can realize they need to bring help, Bryant is jogging back on defense after canning the jumper.
  • Here’s a name for you. IT’S SHAMMOND WILLIAMS TIME! Williams immediately turns the ball over on a lazy half-court pass to Kobe. The former Tar Heel winds up making $7 million in his six seasons in the NBA. This is why we can’t have nice things.
  • Sasha Vucacic effectively runs the pick-and-pop with Ronny Turiaf. Maybe I should ease back on complimenting the Rockets’ defense.
  • Kwame loudly, and angrily claps at the official after a play. It’s pretty disrespectful when you watch. It would be a tech now, but no one will remember that as they complain about the tech rules.
  • Yao’s patience is really key. So many post players need to get into their move immediately after the catch. But Yao’s hands are so good, he’s able to be patient. That and the fact that he’s seven-feet-six-inches helps, too. He’s drawing fouls on nearly every touch in the third, but Tracy McGrady keeps shooting.
  • In case you were wondering why the Rockets later made a big move for Ron Artest, Kirk Snyder just tried defending Kobe Bryant again.
  • Want to know what it was like trying to score on Yao when he had you locked in on the rotation and actually jumped? Take a look at this runner attempt from Kobe Bryant. Not pictured: Kobe Bryant.
  • Bryant loops off a screen to the left baseline, Yao closes to his right. Bryant double clutches in air to get a feel for where Yao’s hands are, then slips the ball under Yao’s arms and in for a bucket. Incredible.
  • No wonder Laker fans hated this team. They blew so many layups. They keep getting open looks off the cut and a good pass, and no one outside of Bryant can finish.
  • Yao has no assists in this game, mostly on account of his team’s dreadful shooting. The Rockets shoot 38 percent in the game despite Yao shooting 61 percent. *Cough* Tracy McGrady! *Cough.* Yao’s hands are so soft for a guy like that. That’s really what’s missing, maybe, from the current crop of centers. There are no legit 7-footers, but there’s also no one with those kind of hands. He’s able to put the right positioning on every pass one-handed.
  • Yao starts to get the baby hook going, and the Rockets lead starts to balloon.
  • Joel Meyers on a missed Smush Parker 3-pointer. “You couldn’t ask for a better look.” Unless it wasn’t Smush Parker taking it, I assume he means.
  • Kobe Bryant is in hero mode, and just launching whatever he can. He’s going one-on-tow, one-on-three. Just throwing it up there.  His shot’s gone and the lead is ten in the fourth.
  • The lead is up to twelve with 4:20 to go when things go bonkers.
  • Bryant hits a 35-foot three in that sweet spot he likes on the right wing just near the baseline, then nails a floater. Kwame blocks Yao’s turnaround, then Kobe gets too excited and shoots another 35-foot contested three which misses, but Odom rebounds. Back to Bryant who slips baseline to draw the foul. Seven points straight for Bryant.
  • Kwame gambles and rips the ball away from Yao, pushes ahead to Bryant who hits a runner over Yao. Nine points.
  • Bryant hits a PUJIT 3 for his twelfth straight and the lead is only three.
  • On the next possession, McGrady misses, Kobe again goes hero mode from the same long spot, air-balls, and Ronny Turiaf catches it and slips it in. One point game.
  • Lots of traded free throws, and after Bryant badly misses another contested 35-40 foot 3, the Lakers force a turnover. On the inbounds, the Rockets Hack-A-Kwame to send him to the line. He misses the first.
  • Then all hell breaks loose. Kwame goes to the line for the second, down three, and…
  • As a matter of fact, Joel, I do believe it, because it is Kobe Bryant. T-Mac misses and we go to overtime.
  • Meyers starts off the overtime by saying “Someone else is going to have to score, Kobe can’t do it by himself.” Bryant immediately makes a pull-up jumper. Snapper: “Well, maybe he can!”
  • Bryant with another dagger, a step-inside the three-point line. It’s slipping away from the Rockets and the Staples crowd is alive since it has a chance at winning.
  • When the Rockets needed it most, Yao hits a baby-hook with Kwame right in his grill, it barely breezes the net.
  • Luke Walton misses a jumper, because really, that’s the guy you want shooting in this situation, then Kwame is slow to rotate again, and Odom has to foul Yao, who miraculously only makes one of two, one of his four misses on the day.
  • Bryant nails another pull-up elbow jumper, what feels like his fiftieth of the day, to score his 53 points. Surely, surely that’s enough, right?
  • Don’t call me Shirley. Because it’s long in Chinese. (Note: I have no idea about its actual length in Chinese.)
  • McGrady draws a really suspicious foul on Bryant. He loops around a screen, Bryant bumps him trying to cut him off, McGrady takes a one-hop 3-pointer attempt, they call continuation. Three free throws, McGrady makes two of three, and it’s a one point game. Kobe time, right?
  • Bryant drives baseline, takes on three defenders, three very good defenders at once and hoists up a desperation shot that misses badly. Lakers facepalm then scream at you for laughing at it.
  • McGrady misses a jumper (shocker), Juwan Howard (guess who!) rebounds over Odom and Kwame, and drops it to Yao (over Odom’s head) and…
  • Kobe called for traveling?! Yes, that actually happened.
  • Free throws, down three, Bryant with a chance to tie the game… and he launches a 40-foot-contested-three with five seconds left on the clock. No good. Rockets win. But Chalupas!
  • Yao is so consistent in this game, Bryant so maddeningly conscience-less and at the same time brilliant, it stands as a time capsule for their careers. There was a time when Yao’s absolute control lead him to be one of the game’s greats before things that were beyond his control ruined it, and a time when Bryant’s unquestioned leadership was as much a double-edged sword as it is now. It’s a shame we never got to see the two really battle for a full playoff series. But then, that’s the story of Yao.

PBT’s RetroBall: Suns-Sonics ’93 and the night Barkley wouldn’t lose


Since billionaire owners and millionaire players are bitterly divided over how much money they’ll be splitting over the coming years and have locked us out of actual basketball to talk about, PBT will be regaling you this summer on the weekends withRetroBall. Using the advanced powers of the internet and NBATV, we’ll bring you interesting stories from years gone by. If nothing else, it will provide us an opportunity to make fun of fashion and culture from the past, which is always a giggle.

This week we bring you a reminder that players should not be defined by their post-career caricatures. I have this nightmare. With Charles Barkley the bombastic, heavy-set column that hoists “Inside the NBA” up, there’s a generation of kids that will only know Barkley as the guy in the T-Mobile commercials who hates Golden State/Miami/Dallas/whoever. Barkley was of the Jordan years, and as such, his legacy suffers accordingly. His Finals appearances only reflect a counterpoint to Jordan, yet another great player who couldn’t get past MJ, much like Karl Malone and Clyde Drexler with Portland. It’s a disservice to what Barkley did, especially considering how he did it, that he’s looked at as the foil to Jordan and the guy who banters with Dwyane Wade in commercials.

So with that in mind, I took a look at Game 7 of the Western Conference Finals between Barkley’s Phoenix Suns and the Seattle Supersonics, led by Shawn Kemp, Ricky Pierce, and Eddie Johnson, along with Gary Payton in just his third year in the league, still learning how to become “The Glove.”

Speaking of Malone, the Sonics knocked off Malone and Stockton’s Jazz in the first round, before cementing themselves as true upstarts after downing Olajuwon’s Rockets. The Rockets would win the title the following year (when Jordan took his “break”). The Sonics were the third seed that year, but were tied with the Rockets at 55 wins. It was Kemp’s time.

Barkley, on the other hand, was having his MVP season and Phoenix looked like a team of destiny, if you didn’t factor in the fact that Jordan existed. This was Barkley at his best, and there isn’t a better game to showcase how dominant he could be. His final line? 44 points on 12-20 shooting, 19-22 from the stripe, 24 rebounds (!), 14 offensive, 1 assist, 1 steal, 1 block, 1 turnover.

What follows are my observations from watching the game. I was eleven at the time, so consider these observations from a fresh eye.

  • We’re obviously biased here, but I’ll still say the “NBA on NBC” opening and their coverage throughout was just lightyears beyond everything else that’s been done. It managed to capture the drama of the moment without dousing it in forced history. You felt like you were watching history be made without being told you were watching history be made.
  • Best part about this game? THIN SHAWN KEMP! (As in, the era before Fat Shawn Kemp.) If you were building the perfect power forward, this 23-year-old version of Kemp was pretty much the perfect model. He was still raw, but was already averaging 18 points and 11 boards with 2 blocks per game. Kemp in the last three games of this series headed into Game 7 had scored 20, 33, and 22 points on Barkley, and had the following field goal percentages: 62%, 72% (in that 33-point game, in a loss!), 67%. He was lithe, he was explosive, and he actually had a turnaround jumper. It’s weird to think of a power forward who is raw but actually has a face-up game. Now if you’re raw that pretty much means you’re a basketball jellyfish. You’re fast and long, but if asked to do anything complex you just bob incoherently.
  • The Suns explode out of the gate, and it’s not even really Barkley, he’s only got six in the first period. (That’s right, Barkley scores 38 points over the final three frames.) No, instead it’s the unlikely combination of Tom Chambers and Mark West. I know! Who saw that coming, right?
  • Chambers is actually in for Cedric Ceballos who went down in this series with a stress fracture in his right foot. Chambers was actually the third oldest player on roster behind Frank Johnson and Kurt Rambis, who got a DNP-CD in this game. No word on if this is because Kahn retroactively enforced one.
  • You want something to blow your mind, forget thin Shawn Kemp. Give a look to thin Oliver Miller. Seriously. I Googled an image of Miller with the Raptors to compare. Here’s Miller with the Suns in Game 7, 1993:
  • source:  And here’s what he looked like seven years later:
  • source:  So you can obviously see the change there.
  • Gary Payton isn’t quite Gary Payton yet, here. He’s still working on developing into the Glove. It’s only his third season, and he’s up against a much better player in Kevin Johnson, who’s in his prime. Johnson absolutely torches Payton in this one. “The Glove” is more like a loose-fitting piece of cloth that one wraps around a hand. More like a hand moo-moo. Johnson’s crossover and change of direction is phenomenal in this game. At one point, Payton gives him a solid three feet of room to try and contain him, Johnson blows by him anyway, then drops in a running hook and-one. It’s a virtuoso performance, but moreso on the defensive side. Johnson is spying constantly like a safety let off the called-play chain. The Sonics thrice try and force the break and Johnson cuts off the outlet pass.
  • In a nice premonition of the Seven Seconds or Less years, the Suns are downright merciless in transition. The break starts immediately, and KJ makes his decision on what to do after two steps and as soon as he’s across the timeline. Most of the time he’s just blowing by defenders and getting in for layups, the Sonics don’t have anyone who can challenge defensively at the rim with the amount of time and energy Kemp’s having to pay Barkley.
  • The Sonics shooters kind of drift in and out of this game. Derrick McKey shows up and lights up the second quarter which puts the Sonics back within range. Then Eddie Johnson takes over the late third and fourth. Sam Perkins has a nice third quarter. But they can’t get consistent performances from anyone (though to be fair, if Eddie Johnson played the whole game like he did in the third quarter, he would have broken Wilt’s record and Barkley would have wound up killing someone in the locker room later.
  • Early on the Sonics are doing a great job on Barkley, sending the double immediately. If he were Dwight Howard, this would be the end of the story. But Barkley actually adjusts to the coverage and starts cutting immediately after passing out of the double, which confuses the Sonics to no end as all their lanes are then in chaos. At one point, Barkley just loops around Majerle low and shoves Majerle into two defenders, which allows Ainge to float him the ball right in the center of the paint for an easy one.
  • Barkley starts to get going in the second, then absolutely destroys the third quarter. He’s everywhere. Kemp’s there with him step for step and Barkley’s just owning him. Kemp makes two hard moves to deny the entry pass and the third time down, Barkley just head fakes him, turns and goes to the basket for an easy dunk. Most of them are not this easy. Barkley’s anticipation is on display here. The Suns were essentially able to play four perimeter guys with Barkley because even then, he’d wind up with the board.
  • Danny Ainge at this point had played in five finals over the past eight years. Remarkably, he never traded Kendrick Perkins in any of them.
  • Ainge is pretty much the “you gotta be kidding me” guy to Seattle. They can handle everyone else, but just when they think they’ve closed off the offense effectively, Ainge lights them up on catch and shoot. It’s more than they can handle.
  • Mark West with a great weak-side recovery to block Payton at the rim. On the block, which was clean, West makes contact elbow-to-head on Payton. Payton just turns and runs back on defense. Today, Payton would have clutched his head and crumpled to the floor, perhaps penning a letter to his mother on his death-bed.
  • Barkley spins around Kemp from about 16 feet baseline. The help defense comes to try and cut off the baseline, while Payton is trying to play his backside to make sure he doesn’t double back for a hook. The result is that Barkley moves in-between the two and double-clutches one-handed while fading away from under the rim, good, and-one. Kemp picks up his fourth foul.
  • Another thing that’s shocking about Barkley, he can handle in transition. Now at 6-6, this isn’t shocking, he’s basically an oversized 3. But he’s dribbling with such authority, it makes you realize how few of today’s bigs can really do that. Except for like, Josh Smith, who chooses not to and instead just now, as I wrote this, took another three.
  • When Eddie Johnson starts going off in the third, Barkley actually tails off on his rotation, springs out and blocks him. Running down the floor, you can see Barkley say, “Enough of this (expletive).”
  • In the fourth, the Suns kick the thing into absolute overdrive. They’re forcing everything, and the Sonics are just reeling. They managed to get the lead down to 9 in the early fourth, before the Suns just have one of those “We are winning this game. We are going to the Finals, we are not losing to Ricky Pierce” runs.
  • At one point Payton goes for a rebound, Barkley snags and starts throwing elbows, resulting in Payton chirping in his ear for a solid five feet. Barkley shoves him three feet back, turns and yells back at him. In today’s NBA, that’s two techs. Here it’s just good clean entertainment.
  • Eddie Johnson at one point tosses it off Majerle’s back inbounding, catches it and nails an 18 foot baseline J. The Sonics had to be killing themselves that they wasted a 34 point Eddie Johnson explosion at age 33. Johnson winds up scoring 34 points on 17 shots in 26 minutes. Twenty-six!
  • Nate McMillan was burly in this game. He couldn’t get his jumper going but his defensive work was pretty stout. The Sonics’ defensive strategy was actually pretty sound. Lots of doubles, lots of traps, lots of zone to cut off the passing lanes. Unfortunately, Charles Barkley does not care what you do.
  • I always make fun of the unnecessary “MVP” chants, but the chants for Barkley at the line for his playoff career-high in points seem really appropriate and make the hair on the back of your neck stand up.
  • Chants of “Beat the Bulls” begin as the clock winds down. Oh, Phoenix. You’re always so hopeful.
  • The closer lineup for Phoenix is KJ, Ainge, Dan Majerle, Barkley,and Tom Chambers. And it works. They crush the Sonics, breaking open an 18 point lead to cruise to a double-digit win and a trip to the Finals.
  • Barkley had guaranteed a win. This was everything to him. He truly believed this was his year to make greatness happen. And the Sonics had pushed the Suns to seven games. So when Barkley went out, after an unbelievable game, this: source:


PBT’s RetroBall: Pistons-Bulls ’89 and Jordan’s good bad day


Since billionaire owners and millionaire players are bitterly divided over how much money they’ll be splitting over the coming years and have locked us out of actual basketball to talk about, PBT will be regaling you this summer on the weekends with RetroBall. Using the advanced powers of the internet and NBATV, we’ll bring you interesting stories from years gone by. If nothing else, it will provide us an opportunity to make fun of fashion and culture from the past, which is always a giggle.

We begin our RetroBall series by accident. Yesterday I was asked by someone on Twitter if Jordan had ever fouled out as a member of the Chicago Bulls. A reasonable question, considering the insane amount of leeway Jordan got as a Bull when he became, you know, MJ. I dutifully looked it up on play index, curious in my own right, and found it had happened six times in his career. It never happened after the Bulls won their first championship in ’91. But when I looked at the list, I found myself fixating on his lowest point-total game.

On January 31st, 1989, the Bulls hosted the eventual champion Pistons in Chicago. The Pistons dominated the Bulls that season in both the regular and postseason, eventually losing in the Eastern Conference Finals to Isiah and the Bad Boys (4-2). But this January game was interesting in that it was such an example of Jordan being Jordan. He shot 24 times, hitting only seven shots for a 29% field goal percentage. He scored just 21 points, in a season he averaged 32.5. He fouled out of the game. Yet he also had a triple-double, with 12 rebounds and 10 assists. So he had this terrible game… and yet still scored 21 points with 12 rebounds, 10 assists, 2 steals and a block…. but he also had five turnovers. He accounted for 37.4% of all possessions for the Bulls, factoring FGA, FTA, and turnovers. What a bizarre game.

Thanks to the very helpful Vincent Goodwill of the Detroit News, I got my hands on a YouTube copy. Since I was six at the time, and living in rural Arkansas, I shockingly did not receive the TBS broadcast of the game. So I decided to sit down and watch it. What follows are my observations thereof. (Please bear in mind that seeing as how I was six and wouldn’t become interested in the league for another six years, my observations of both teams at this time are incomplete at best, shoddy at worst. Think of it as something to keep in mind before we make incomplete judgment on today’s players.)

  • It’s striking how despite the fact that 37% of the offense in this game goes through Jordan, he primarily plays off-ball for the majority of the first-half. He’s not even scowling at it, really. Though when he does receive the ball, the moves are all instantaneous. They manage to be simultaneously without hesitation and spontaneous. No one pounced quicker on any opportunity than Jordan. You see the same thing from Kobe Bryant, but his ability to adjust isn’t as flawless.
  • The Pistons’ help defense is borderline insane on Jordan in this game. Thrice his defender plays hard to the screen before the pick comes, and the low help defender (twice it’s Laimbeer) comes up from the block to guard it just in case. This means the entire left side is open which means that the second Jordan bursts left, he’s got nothing but baseline. It results in seven points for Jordan total.
  • Isiah Thomas starts off remarkably shaky in this game. He keeps trying to find the elbow-jumper, but it clatters out on him multiple times. He’s picking up turnovers left and right (he’ll wind up with seven over the course of 51 minutes, accounting for a lower percentage than four other players. Most of his first-half turnovers are the result of bad passes from teammates.
  • Being reminded of just how brutal these Bad Boys were on defense, I want to issue an apology to the 2005 Detroit Pistons, the 2007 San Antonio Spurs, the 2010 Boston Celtics, and 2011 Chicago Bulls for ever complaining about how ugly their games are. They might as well be run-and-gunners in comparison. You know how everyone above the age of 35 talks about how much more physical these games were? They’re right. The question of “Was he making a play on the ball?” is pretty laughable here. Twice the Pistons merely hammer Jordan, going so far as completing their turn after contract and just slamming their sides into him. Once they actually trap his ankles between two trips on a drive. It’s jarring. And it works. Jordan’s jumper never does get wet, and the help defense coming to the elbow smothers him. Particularly, Vinnie Johnson plays extremely admirable work in the stead of Joe Dumars who missed nearly a month from January to February. Johnson not only provides excellent offense, but works to get up in Jordan’s grill, even forcing an airball off a fadeaway. This despite giving up over four inches to Jordan.
  • Speaking of Johnson, his game here reminds me a lot of Marcus Thornton. I’m rebuked on Twitter for it, but Johnson is a smaller two-guard who loves pull-up no-conscience jumpers and has the same kind of frame. Thornton is taller, shoots a lower percentage, and isn’t as good at assists at this point in his career, but the numbers are similar otherwise, as are their comparative styles.
  • So this happened:
  • source:
  • Beautiful, isn’t it?
  • Also, this: source:
  • Okay, maybe not so beautiful.
  • Horace Grant is unbelievable in this game. He winds up with sixteen points on 7-11 shooting, and 18 rebounds along with 2 assists, a steal and a block. Twice he simply waits for the defense to all turn towards Jordan on the perimeter and catching the lob. It makes you feel sorry for Derrick Rose who has no such option.
  • If Jordan has a good bad day, Laimbeer has a bad good day. He’s forced too far out by the Bulls’ motion on and off-ball, and when he does recover, twice on Scottie Pippen, his teammates foul. But in cleaning up, he’s impeccable. If the defense breaks down for a half-second and Laimbeer catches, it’s over. The Bulls have no one who can attack him at the rim. Or near it, as that’s where Laimbeer shoots from.
  • Scottie Pippen is long. I understand this is not news, but bear in mind this is early on, before the Bulls’ gained all that veteran weight. At this point he’s like a bunch of brooms stuck together with a giant eraser on top. Pippen’s in his second season here, and the aggressiveness is mind-boggling. You can tell Pippen hasn’t fully embraced sidekick status. He’s near-suicidal in attacking the Pistons. Off the steal he’s taking two steps to get into the paint then exploding forward. But just as his youth gives him the advantage of explosion, it hurts him with the officials. He makes it to the line just four times.
  • Fascinating subplot: Rodman off the bench takes over on defending Jordan. Because Rodman is just in his third year (though 27), or maybe just because he’s guarding Jordan, he’s taking to the cleaners by Jordan and the officials. Twice in the third quarter Jordan clears out with his left at a Byron Russell level, and gets away with it clean.
  • Doug Collins hopes you enjoy this old tune, “In the Air Tonight.”
  • Adrian Dantley shoots 3-13 and has 20 points. He gets to the line 18 times (eight more than Jordan!) and the calls are legit. He works over pretty much anyone the Bulls throw at him. He’s the biggest reason Pippen winds up with four fouls just minutes into the third. In fifteen days, he’ll be traded to the Dallas Mavericks for Mark Aguirre.
  • The third quarter is eerily reminiscent of watching the Celtics defend Derrick Rose. The Pistons gear three guys at Jordan, who decides if they’re going to attack his jumper that hard, he’s just going to kill them with assists. He drives past the first defender, spins past the second and dishes to whoever is open or cutting. Grant, Sam Vincent, Sellers, everybody gets some.
  • Speaking of Sellers, one of the biggest busts winds up having a pretty decent game. He attacks the offensive glass, finishes where he needs to and doesn’t look completely lost. He also has zero defensive rebounds, but since the Pistons only wind up with 12 for 26% it’s not a nightmare.
  • Also nice side note. I see on Basketball-Reference that he’s listed as No.6. But in this game he’s wearing No.2. So I go back to find out what the deal is and I find this: Sellers blames his struggles as a Bull on wearing No.2… because it’s cursed. You can laugh at that all you want. Guess what number Eddy Curry wore for the Bulls?
  • James Edwards looks like he belongs on a Tyler Perry special.
  • Rick Mahorn’s ‘Stache should have its own business cards.
  • Basically in the third quarter, Rick Mahorn and Bill Cartwright have an episode that is bizarre to any modern NBA fan. Mahorn elbows Cartright in the chest on a box out (that’s a tech now), then Cartwright off and shoves Mahorn (that’s an ejection now), then Mahorn goes back at Cartwright (that’s another ejection), then Cartwright shoves him again (re-ejection?), then the Bulls hold Mahorn back. Try and imagine if Carlos Boozer and Ronnie Brewer held back Kevin Garnett from Joakim Noah and how that would go over. So basically, players in this era simultaneously disliked each other more than they do now, and yet treated each other with more respect and didn’t act as much like children.
  • Offensive rebounds aplenty for Chicago, mostly because they’re sending nine guys at Jordan (yes, nine).
  • Count me among those that remembered Rodman as having absolutely zero offense. Watch this game and you’ll feel differently.
  • The league average for 3PA per game this year was 18. In ’89, the Bulls averaged 6.5 per game, which was 13th in the league, and would be bottom three today. The Pistons attempted 4.9 per game, which was 18th in the league in ’89, and would be downright bizarre now. In this game? Both teams combined shot 14, with 8 of those coming from Chicago’s Craig Hodges. This was an overtime game.
  • You know those games where the veteran squad gets behind because the home team is playing with energy and exuberance, but the veteran squad just hangs around and hangs around? That. Lots of that.
  • Thomas has several buckets by slicing right, creating contact, double-clutching and going glass. Dwyane Wade stuff.
  • In the fourth, Jordan goes after the offensive glass, getting putbacks. How? I have no clue. He just does. One of those MJ things.
  • Dave Corzine is mesmerizing in this game. Not only for the hair, and for being Dave Corzine, but he blocks Laimbeer at the elbow at one point, starting a fast break.
  • Rodman does everything conceivable to try and keep Jordan in front of them, then tries to sell a pretty bad shoulder bump by Jordan on a baseline drive, again, no call, and Jordan slips left baseline for a righty layup. I will say that in modern NBA, that righty layup gets blocked into oblivion against the glass by whatever token athletic help defender the opponent has on the floor.
  • Here’s one for all you Knicks fans:
  • source:  Isiah pretty much starts going Derrick Rose again, relentlessly attacking the rim and going to the line every time as the game closes in on five minutes to go. Chicago’s got a sense of “how are we not up ten?”
  • There’s a segment with less than four minutes to go featuring Snapper Jones’ mother on a cooking show. That’s called “seizing the drama of the moment.”
  • Jordan did just miss some in this game. It’s like what would happen if that insane ability to hit everything he threw up abandoned him for a night. No wonder he hated Detroit so much.
  • Dennis Rodman hits a turnaround. Skip Caray says “If he learns to do that consistently, he’s going to be some player.” ROFL.
  • With 37 seconds left, Rodman finally gets the offensive foul call on Jordan barreling through the lane… and Jordan fouls out!
  • Jones says this is the first time Jordan’s fouled out this season. So Jordan goes out with less than forty seconds left with the Bulls down two.
  • Sellers fouls. Dantley… misses the first free throw? What the?
  • So nineteen seconds left, Bulls with the ball, down two. So obviously you work to get Jordan the… oh. Huh. I have no clue what Doug Collins is supposed to do here, but if this was 2011, the answer is obviously “lose, so they can get draft Jan Vesely.”
  • Well, that’s just insane. Pippen inbounds, it’s broken up, right back to Pippen, who drives, and throws up a runner and is fouled. Goes to the line, hits two with sixteen seconds left. Wow, that’s a confusing sequence for Detroit right there.
  • Vinnie Johnson posts up Pippen, gets the corner, gets to the rim… and just off the front lip. Drama! Overtime! Only on TBS!
  • If you need a laugh sometime, just watch Dennis Rodman and Bill Laimbeer run up the floor next to each other. “High knees, everyone! High knees!”
  • And the Piston who takes over is… Rodman? Rodman collects an offensive board and puts it back in. His eighth point since the third. And he’s getting offensive rebounds. No wonder Chicago wanted him so badly later. The Pistons are now hammering the Bulls on the glass with Sellers off the floor. Yes I’m serious.
  • Rodman comes weakside and blocks a buzzer-beater layup attempt from Hodges. Unbelievable play. And he didn’t do anything insane, or cocaine. Impressive.
  • Bill Cartwright cuts Isiah’s eye on a rebound, Laimbeer has to restrain him. Bill Cartwright vs. The Pistons!
  • Laimbeer, 18-footer. Dagger.
  • The Pistons grind them into oblivion and win, 104-98. They’ll go on to beat the Bulls in the ECF and win the title.