Tag: Reggie Evans

Brooklyn Nets V Detroit Pistons

Kevin Garnett took Mason Plumlee’s crab cake, gave it to Reggie Evans because “veterans eat first”


This is about the most Kevin Garnett story ever, as relayed by new Blazer and former Net Mason Plumlee on ESPN.

You heard that right. The Nets were on a team plane last year when Plumlee got to order food first because the youngsters boarded before the vets. KG was having none of that. He took Plumlee’s crab cake, gave it to Reggie Evans — because veterans eat first — and then made Plumlee play the role of flight attendant and serve all the vets.

And Plumlee laughs about it now.

Consider this a heads up, Karl-Anthony Towns. All the lessons are not on the court.

From bench, Reggie Evans ask Giannis Antetokounmpo his age, can’t believe the answer (video)

Milwaukee Bucks v Brooklyn Nets

Like many of us, Kings reserve Reggie Evans can’t believe the things Giannis Antetokounmpo already does on a basketball court.

So, when he got the chance, Evans asked the Greek Freak his age (hat tip: Eric Buenning of BrewHoop).

  • Evans: “How old are you?”
  • Antetokounmpo: “20”
  • Evans: “20? … Damn”

Damn, indeed.

Darren Collison, who went from hot-shot rookie to journeyman, may have found niche with Kings

Houston Rockets v Sacramento Kings

BOSTON – Darren Collison lost a job because he played well. He lost a job because he got hurt. And he lost a job because he played poorly.

The point guard has moved around the NBA at nearly an unprecedented rate for someone with his early career credentials, but maybe, just maybe, he has found a place he can stay for a while.

The Kings gave Collison a three-year, $16 million contract in free agency last summer – even though that meant casting aside incumbent starter Isaiah Thomas, a player many (myself included) thought was superior to Collison. Collison has rewarded their faith, posting career highs in points per game (16.4), assists per game (5.9) and PER (18.7).

There’s little stability in Sacramento – where the coach just got fired despite exceeding all reasonable expectations, the owner has his own crazy ideas and the franchise player is brooding – but Collison has potential to stick. His speed equips him to run the up-tempo, jazzy system Vivek Ranadivé wants, and Collison’s bond with DeMarcus Cousins gives him a powerful ally.

“The opportunity is definitely here,” Collison said last week. “It just seems like everything is all coming together. I’m more confident.”

Collison has long had reason to be confident in himself, though not always his fit with his team.

He broke in with the 2009-10 New Orleans Hornets, getting a huge opportunity when Chris Paul got hurt. In 37 starts, Collison averaged 18.8 points, shooting 48.5 percent from the field and 42.9 percent on 3-pointers, and 9.1 assists per game – All-Star-caliber numbers. Of course, no matter how well Collison played, the Hornets weren’t going to choose him over Paul.

They dealt him to Indiana, where he became a full-time starter and helped the Pacers end their longest playoff drought of his lifetime (four seasons). Reggie Miller comparisons didn’t seem outlandish. But Collison got hurt during his second season in Indiana, and George Hill Wally Pipped him in the starting lineup.

The Pacers sold low on Collison, trading him to the Mavericks. Dallas initially started Collison, but he lost the role to Dominique Jones, then Derek Fisher, then Mike James after Rick Carlisle expressed frustration with Collison’s defense. By the time the 2012-13 season ended, the Mavericks didn’t even extend Collison a qualifying offer.

He signed with the Clippers, taking a pay cut from his rookie-scale contract. Full circle, he was once again backing up and sometimes playing with Chris Paul. After the season, he opted out seeking a raise.

That’s when the Kings came calling, becoming Collison’s fifth team six seasons.

Just two other players have made an All-Rookie first team since the NBA-ABA merger and played for so many teams in their first six seasons:

  • Marc Jackson, 2001 (Warriors, Timberwolves, 76ers, New Jersey Nets, New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets)
  • Ron Mercer, 1998 (Celtics, Nuggets, Magic, Bulls, Pacers)

Jackson was out of the league one year later, and Mercer lasted only one more than that. The 27-year-old Collison certainly hopes he won’t suffer a similar fate.

That’s why Collison appreciates his opportunity in Sacramento.

“That’s all it is, really,” Collison said. “There’s a lot of good players in this league, but they don’t necessarily have the opportunity. Sometimes, they’re with a team, and they still don’t have an opportunity. They’re not going out there playing their games. I think, this year, I have a chance to do that.

“When I was with previous teams, it was hard to fit in. I couldn’t play my game, necessarily. So, this year, has been good for me.”

And good for the Kings’ offense.

They’re posting their best offensive rating relative to league average in a decade, and Collison is steering the ship.

Prior to this season, Collison has never had a dramatic effect on his teams’ offensive outputs. They’d all scored within two points per 100 possessions with him on the court as they did with him off.

But Sacramento’s offensive rating jumps from 95.6 with him off to 107.8 with him on.


Some of that success can be chalked up to Collison spending most of his minutes with Cousins, Sacramento’s top player. But credit Collison for quickly learning how to play with the star center. Cousins scores better by volume (26.8 to 24.2 points per 36 minutes) and efficiency (51.7 to 46.4 field-goal percentage) when Collison is on the court rather than off.

The key to meshing with Cousins?

“Give him the ball, and let him work,” Collison said. “…It’s that easy.”

Collison’s deferential attitude aside, he’s not merely riding Cousins’ coattails. When the center missed 10 straight games with viral meningitis, the Kings still scored much better with Collison on the court than off (103.7 to 94.7 points per 100 possessions).

In fact, pair Collison with any teammate, and the Kings score better with Collison on the court. Here’s Sacramento’s offensive rating with each player and Collison on the court (purple) and off the court (black), sorted by minutes played with Collison:


(Eric Moreland, who barely played before suffering a season-ending injury, is excluded from the visualization.)

Player Min. with Collison Min. without Collison Off. rating with Collison Off. rating without Collison Diff.
Rudy Gay 966 200 109.1 99.0 +10.1
Ben McLemore 874 254 108.5 95.5 +13.0
Jason Thompson 682 157 105.1 91.9 +13.2
DeMarcus Cousins 550 195 111.9 98.6 +13.3
Carl Landry 263 358 103.7 92.8 10.9
Reggie Evans 238 185 105.7 96.0 +9.7
Derrick Williams 206 243 111.3 98.4 +12.9
Omri Casspi 155 300 108.6 96.0 +12.6
Ryan Hollins 144 58 98.1 83.6 +14.5
Nik Stauskas 141 330 105.4 96.1 +9.3
Ray McCallum 71 205 110.7 91.7 +19
Ramon Sessions 33 394 107.4 97.4 +10
Eric Moreland 1 1 200.0 166.7 +33.3

At some point, the common denominator becomes clear: Collison.

He knocks down pull-up jumpers from mid-range, not exactly an analytical hotbed, but a part of the floor that opens thanks to his pick-and-roll probing. He has improved working off the ball, spotting up for corner 3s. And he keeps the ball moving.

In a conference where half the Kings’ opponents start a former All-Star at point guard, Collison doesn’t exactly stand out. But he’s brining credibility to the position in Sacramento.

“He’s comfortable,” Kings coach Tyrone Corbin said. “He’s gotten his confidence back. His speed, pushing the ball down the floor. He knows he’s going to be on the floor for a certain amount of minutes, so he’s relaxed and just playing at a pace that’s favorable to his style of play.”

It’d be foolish to say Collison, just 31 games into his Sacramento tenure, has found a home. His previous teams have struggled to determine whether he should start or come off the bench for fair reasons, and toeing that line has made him expendable.

But this season, Collison is showing he’s a quality starter.

“This year, I definitely proved that,” Collison said. “So, now, it’s not even about proving to be a good starter. It’s about leading the team now.”

PBT Monday NBA Winners/Losers: At least one thing is working well in Washington

Paul Pierce

Every night the NBA can be a cold hard reality — there are winners, there are losers. It’s the nature of the game. We know you are busy and can’t keep up with every game, so we’re here to bring you the best and worst of the NBA each week night. Here’s what you missed while you watched the Entourage movie trailer again (I can’t wait for this one)….

source:  Washington Wizards. Are you mentioning this team as one of the best in the East? You should be. While the rest of the East struggles, the Wizards are now 7-2 against the powerful West. Those same Wizards have the best defense in the East so far — better than the Bulls — and that plus a variety of guys who can score the ball make them a threat out East. The Wizards showed a lot of what makes them dangerous in beating the Rockets in the game of the night on Monday, 104-103. The Wizards led by 23 at one point but the Rockets made a late charge behind James Harden (9 points in the final :19 seconds, he finished with 33) but the Wizards just had answers. They had their own 33 point man in Bradley Beal, who did it on 9-of-17 shooting. The Wizards went 8-of-8 from the free throw line down the stretch. And they have Paul Pierce, the veteran who had 21 points on 9 shots on the night, and he had the biggest shot of the game.

source:  Rim at the Toyota Center in Houston. Just :48 seconds into the game, the rim at the Toyota Center was bent and the game had to stop for nearly 30 minutes while the arena crew put in a new basket. That’s always entertaining. The damage apparently happened on a Dwight Howard dunk and not, as rumored, because of Josh Smith’s jump shots.

source:  Danny Granger.The man has apparently been taking is post-game soaks in the hot tub time machine, because he looks more like the 2010 version of himself than the guy we have seen in recent years. Granger hit six three pointers on his way to 21 points in Miami’s loss to Orlando. Granger had 18 in the Heat’s previous game against Memphis. Consider me cynical that he can sustain this, but right now Granger is in throwback mode and making the Heat look, well, if not good then better.

source:  Jimmy Butler. The man is earning himself a big payday — the Bulls couldn’t reach a deal with him on a contract extension before the season and while Butler says he does not want to leave Chicago next summer the cost of keeping him is going up by the game. He scored seven of his 27 points in the fourth quarter and was a guy the Bulls leaned on to get buckets in a close win over Indiana. Butler is scoring 22 points a game averaging 40 minutes a night and has become a key cog in the Bulls. When the coaches get around to voting for the All-Star Game reserves it’s going to be tough to leave him off the list.

source:  Kings 4-on-5 strategy. Okay, this was not how the Kings’ owner drew it up… okay, he was never going to “draw it up” it was just an idea he had to have one player cherry-pick on offense and have the defenders go 4-on-5 with the other team. This only happened because Reggie Evans went to the bench thinking DeMarcus Cousins was checking in only to realize Cousins wasn’t waived in, so Evans sprinted back onto the court in cherry picking position. It still is the same principle. Then Evans caps it off the only way that would be truly funny.

Kings finally try Vivek Ranadive’s 4-on-5 cherry-picking offense, with disastrous results (VIDEO)

Reggie Evans

Since this summer, there have been reports that Kings owner Vivek Ranadive wanted his team to experiment with playing a 4-on-5 defensive scheme with a cherrypicker on the offensive end. A disagreement over this plan was supposedly one of (many) factors that led to head coach Mike Malone’s dismissal, as ridiculous an idea as it is.

Finally, for the first time, interim coach Ty Corbin tried it. Here’s the play, via The Brooklyn Game:

Reggie Evans missed a wide-open dunk after hanging back on defense. Not the greatest early returns for the strategy. But it’s a long season.