Tag: Raymond Felton

Jeremy Lin

Report: Mavericks talking to Lakers about sign-and-trade for Jeremy Lin


The Mavericks have been linked to Jeremy Lin since the start of free agency. They need a point guard, but after signing Wesley Matthews and DeAndre Jordan, all they have left to work with is the $2.8 million room exception. Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports that they’re exploring sign-and-trade possibilities with the Lakers to land him.

Lin would be a good fit for the Mavs, a legitimate upgrade over the likes of Raymond Felton and Devin Harris. The problem is that they don’t really have much in the way of assets to give the Lakers in a sign-and-trade. Dwight Powell is making less than $1 million, so including him wouldn’t create much room for a bigger contract for Lin. That’s about it as far as young players, unless they want to give up 2015 first-round pick Justin Anderson. This would be an appealing option for the Lakers, but it’s unlikely Dallas will want to do that.

Report: Jeremey Lin considering signing with Dallas Mavericks

Phoenix Suns v Los Angeles Lakers

The Dallas Mavericks are set at four positions: DeAndre Jordan is now in the center slot, Dirk Nowitzki at the four, Chandler Parsons at the three, and Wesley Matthews (coming off Achilles surgery) at the two.

But point guard is a big hole.

There are conversations to bring back J.J. Barea but he alone is not enough.

Jeremy Lin is considering putting his name in the Mavericks’ 10-gallon hat — and taking less money to do it, reports Marc Stein at ESPN.

Dallas only has limited funds to offer, but sources told ESPN.com that Lin is giving the Mavericks strong consideration even though he can likely make more money elsewhere.

Lin’s relationship with Mavericks forward Chandler Parsons from their days as teammates in Houston, sources said, has kept Dallas in the race despite its lack of financial flexibility. Parsons, of course, had a huge hand in the recruiting of DeAndre Jordan to the Mavericks in the richest free-agent score in team history.

What would be smart for Lin is a two-year deal with an opt-out after one. He could ideally show off an improved game — one with fewer turnovers, ideally — and how he helps a contender, then re-enter the free agency market as the cap spike.

Lin is a respectable reserve point guard in the NBA — when allowed to be aggressive in transition, and in the pick-and-roll, he can make things happen. But he turns the ball over on 17.7 percent of his possessions used and he isn’t much of a defender.

He likely can make more than the minimum or, at best (if they waive and stretch Raymond Felton) $2.6 million the Mavericks could offer, but there may not be a better opportunity for Lin than Dallas.

It’s only a phone call, but Lakers reportedly talk to Rajon Rondo

Dallas Mavericks v New Orleans Pelicans

So far, the only serious suitor Rajon Rondo has seen in the wake of his disastrous time in Dallas has been the Sacramento Kings. And after talking to Rondo and hearing his requests, the Kings decided to try and overpay both Monta Ellis and Wesley Matthews. (To no avail, Ellis is headed to Indiana and Matthews to Dallas.)

But Rondo’s phone has rung again — the Lakers have touched base, reports Ramona Shelburne of ESPN.

I don’t think we can say enough, this is just a phone call. It is nothing more than that right now.

The Lakers have two potentially very good young guards in Jordan Clarkson and the just drafted D’Angelo Russell. While the Lakers keep selling fans on speeding up the rebuild process by landing a superstar, the team remains on track to put together the kind of talented young roster that in a couple years could be attractive to those kinds of free agents. (Although, trading away their pick for next season in the Steve Nash deal certainly slows things down.)

I’m not sure bringing in Rondo helps that process. He and Kobe Bryant may get along because they are both uber competitive, but Rondo’s lack of a reliable jump shot has made him defendable, and his defense is good but not as good as its reputation. Look at it this way: During the playoffs, the Dallas Mavericks had better numbers when Raymond Felton was on the court than Rondo.

I don’t think the Lakers are all that serious here. That said, if they could get Rondo on a short deal for less than $7 million a season, they might think about it.

Will Dallas be able to keep Al-Farouq Aminu?

Al-Farouq Aminu, James Harden

There were high hopes for Al-Farouq Aminu when the Los Angeles Clippers used the No. 8 pick on him back in 2010. He was crazy athletic and could defend, but there were issues with his shot and there were teams around the league who wondered if the Clippers of that era could develop a player. They didn’t try for long, he was shipped off to New Orleans in the Chris Paul deal and proceeded to bounce around the league a little impressing nobody.

Dallas gave him a chance as a minimum contract roll of the dice this season, and at 24 Aminu seemed to get it. In the playoffs he averaged 11.2 points and 7.2 rebounds a game, shot 63.3 percent from three and had a PER of 20.3. Small sample size and all, but he played himself into a nice little deal for next year.

The question is can Dallas afford it? Tim MacMahon of ESPN lays it out:

League sources estimate that the market for Aminu will be in the $4 million per year range.

The problem for the Mavs is that they aren’t likely to have the full midlevel exception ($5.46 million) and the cap-room exception ($2.81 million) probably won’t be enough to pay Aminu market value. In other words, the Mavs should plan on needing to use some of their precious cap space to pay Aminu.

The Mavs will explore options to dump Raymond Felton’s $3.95 million in a trade, preferring to use that money to pay Aminu. If the Mavs can’t move Felton in a deal, they could opt to waive him via the stretch provision, which would chop two-thirds of his salary off the team’s 2015-16 cap, creating a chunk of space that could help keep Aminu.

If Dallas wants to do it, they can keep him at a fair price. And Aminu has said he wants to stay in Dallas, he loves the city and the organization.

But this is a business, and if another GM misses out on a target or two and decides to throw an extra million or two at Aminu, Dallas could lose him.

This is not a saga likely to play out at the start of July, but as the month moves along keep an eye on Aminu. He’s finally showing some of that promise.

Mavericks considering signing-and-trading Tyson Chandler for DeAndre Jordan

DeAndre Jordan, Tyson Chandler

DeAndre Jordan is reportedly interested in signing with the Mavericks.

That’d mean Dallas loses Tyson Chandler, who’s also a pending free agent.

Tim MacMahon of ESPN:

A sign-and-trade swap of the centers, which has been mentioned in Mavs front-office offseason brainstorming sessions, would make a lot of sense for all of the involved parties.

Dallas would insist that the Clippers also take reserve point guard Raymond Felton

This probably won’t happen because of the complexity. Four parties – Jordan, Chandler, Mavericks and Clippers – would have to agree.

But – if Jordan wants to sign with Dallas – it’s at least possible.

Why Jordan agrees: He’d get the same money as if he signed with the Mavericks directly. But this way, Jordan helps the Mavericks avoid clearing enough cap space to sign him, which makes it a little easier for them to build a strong supporting cast.

Why Chandler agrees: He had success with Chris Paul in New Orleans, and they’d reunite on a good team in his hometown. There might not be a better destination for Chandler, including Dallas. Paul, Chandler and David West worked well together. Imagine that trio with Blake Griffin instead of West.

Why the Mavericks agree: They’d unload Felton, whose contract is a burden. As a bonus, they’d be helping Jordan, a player the seem to like.

Why the Clippers agree: This would be their best option to replace Jordan. They won’t have cap space if he leaves, and this team is built to win now. Chandler is a downgrade, but the alternative downgrades are much steeper. Felton is a small price to pay for avoiding other routes for finding a new center.