Tag: Ray Allen

Chris Bosh

ProBasketballTalk 2014-15 Preview: Miami Heat


Last season: A fourth straight trip to the NBA Finals resulted in disappointment, as the Heat were steamrolled by the Spurs in five games. The ease with which Miami was dispatched was troubling, so much so that LeBron James re-signing — something most believed to be a foregone conclusion — was suddenly thrown into question. And as the team scrambled to show a willingness to improve by signing guys like Josh McRoberts and Danny Granger in the early days of free agency, the underwhelming nature of those additions ultimately saw James expedite his plan to return home to Cleveland to once again play for the Cavaliers.

Signature highlight from last season: It was tempting to go with the pair of alley-ops Dwyane Wade and LeBron James connected on in the Christmas Day win over the Lakers, because the way the two consistently got out on the break like this for easy buckets in transition during their four years together was about as signature as it gets. But with a nod to the upcoming season where James won’t be present, it felt fitting to go with Wade’s drive and dish to Chris Bosh for a game-winning three against the Blazers — a contest in which James sat out due to injury.

Key offseason moves:

Keys to the Heat season:

Life after LeBron: Having the game’s best player on the roster definitely has its advantages, and it isn’t something anyone in the Heat organization would choose to change about the last four seasons. But now that James has moved on, everything is immediately different on both ends of the floor. The continuity in place with Wade and Bosh being the team’s leaders, and with the highly competent Erik Spoelstra on the sidelines should ease the transition to a certain extent. But Miami will need to reinvent itself from an Xs and Os standpoint, and just how quickly the players get acclimated to those changes will largely determine their success, especially in the early parts of the upcoming season.

The health of Dwyane Wade: Wade was on a strict maintenance program last season to keep his knee from flaring up during the playoffs as it did the year prior, and that left him a gametime decision most nights. It was part of the reason he was limited to participating in just 54 regular season contests, and for the Heat to be successful in the post-LeBron era, they’re going to need a lot more than that out of Wade — not only in terms of minutes played, but also in terms of increased production. The good news for Heat fans is that Wade is planning on doing exactly that, but it’ll be interesting to see how he holds up while pushing himself to play more than he has in any of his previous three seasons.

The return of CB4: Chris Bosh is a perennial All-Star, but since coming to Miami, his numbers have dipped due to having to change his role, while sacrificing personal levels of production for the greater good of the franchise. Thankfully for the Heat, he has proven to be capable of doing so much more. In his final season in Toronto, Bosh averaged a career-high 24 points and 10.8 rebounds, and was unquestionably the team’s best player every single night. Bosh may have to return to his Raptors form for Miami to achieve postseason success, especially in light of Wade’s recent injury history — and he may be more ready than ever to do so.

Why you should watch: Wade and Bosh are still All-Star caliber players, and the addition of another one in Deng should make the Heat consistently competitive most nights. Spoelstra is one of the game’s top coaches at the professional level, and you can bet that he’s relishing the chance to lead his team to success in spite of the loss of Lebron James.

Prediction: With LeBron out of the picture, there are no longer championship expectations placed on this Miami team, which should be a weight off of their collective shoulders. The Heat can be in an underdog role for the first time in a long time, and there’s still more than enough talent in place to make a run at the postseason.

Miami is definitely a playoff team in the East, but is probably not deep enough to claw itself into one of the three top spots in the standings. A ceiling of fourth place in the conference feels about right, with an opportunity to surprise someone in the first (and possibly second) round of the playoffs if Wade, Bosh and Spoelstra find a way to have things clicking by the time the regular season is finished.

Mike Miller points to him being amnestied as start of LeBron James leaving Miami

San Antonio Spurs v Miami Heat - Game 7

LeBron James sold his summer as him going home, that he wanted to return to Cleveland. Certainly that was a big part of his decision.

However, also he had come to question the Miami Heat’s ownership’s commitment to fielding the best team. LeBron said if Miami had won the 2014 title it would have been much harder for him to leave, but he felt part of the reason they didn’t was they didn’t put the best possible product on the court.

That started with them amnestying Mike Miller the previous summer, a move that save the Heat $17 million in salary and luxury tax, but hurt their wing depth and removed one of LeBron’s best friends on the team.

Speaking to Chris Haynes of cleveland.com Miller said his exit was the first crack in the wall for LeBron in Miami.

“LeBron thought it was an unnecessary change,” Miller revealed to Northeast Ohio Media Group. “I’m not saying I would have been a difference-maker. San Antonio was unbelievable last year and there are a lot of things that go into a season, but it was difficult for LeBron.

“It was difficult for all of us. It was difficult for me. I had to uproot my family and move again. It was tough. I think he was disappointed because he understands legacies and he understands what he wants to do in life. That’s what makes him special.”

There was some logic to what Miami did, Miller hadn’t played more than 59 games in the past four seasons, at times it seemed like his body was held together by duct tape. When he played he fit great, but that’s $17 million in savings we’re talking about. So the Heat pulled the trigger.

But it frustrated LeBron because it was a move about money not winning. Then Miller played 82 games for the Grizzlies. LeBron saw Dwyane Wade’s minutes decline and the need for wing shooting remain, and his busy was playing in the land of great barbecue, not with him. LeBron expressed frustration with an owner he saw as not willing to spend to win.

From there the dominoes started falling. LeBron made his decision, and after he did he called Miller and recruited him. It worked, like it did with Kevin Love and everyone else not named Ray Allen (at least so far, he could still chose to join mid-season or whenever).

But Miller seems to have been the first big domino in that sequence.

Spurs coach Gregg Popovich: ‘Good fortune plays a huge role’ in winning a championship

Gregg Popovich

The Spurs beat the Heat to win the 2014 NBA title, in a five-game series that showed just how deserving San Antonio was of that championship crown.

The team was completely dominant from an offensive standpoint, beating Miami handily in the last three games by 19, 21, and 17 points.

But looking back to Game 1, no one yet knew how the series would play out. And LeBron James leaving in the fourth quarter after suffering cramps from dehydration was something that’s happened only one time to him in his entire career. Obviously, San Antonio was able to cruise to victory without James on the floor.

Some would say that was a fortunate turn for the Spurs, and Gregg Popovich knows better than anyone just how critical of a role luck can play on a team’s road to championship success.

From Dan McCarney of the San Antonio Express-News:

“A lot of times winning a championship, people don’t believe — well, I guess the last team standing is probably the best team — but good fortune plays a huge role,” he said. “What’s good fortune? It’s a guy off the bench having a great series. It might be a call or a non-call by an official. It might be an injury. It could be a lot of different things: The way the ball bounces as it ordinarily wouldn’t do in this or that circumstance.

“When we lost in Game 7 to Dallas here in the second round a few years back we were a pretty darn good team and we were capable of winning the championship. The year that Fisher hit the point-four on us we were a pretty good team and I think we were capable of winning a championship. Well, those teams that did win something happened at the opposite end of the spectrum, fortune-wise, that helped them get there. It’s just the way it is.

“In Game 6 of the second half against Oklahoma City last year you wouldn’t have predicted we’d win that game, down nine going into the second half of that game without Tony. And it happened because it’s a game and everything isn’t pre-ordained. Winning championships has something to do with fortune and circumstances and that repeat thing just hasn’t gone our way in that sense.”

This came as part of a discussion about why the Spurs have never won titles in consecutive years; San Antonio’s championships came in 1999, 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2014.

The good fortune Popovich mentions that aided the team last year pales in comparison to the bad luck that befell his squad the year prior. The Spurs were on the verge of locking up the 2013 title in Game 6 against Miami, only to see Ray Allen hit one of the greatest shots in NBA history to send the game to overtime, where the Heat ultimately prevailed before winning the series in seven games.

Mark Cuban: Don’t expect any Mavericks to score 20 points per game

Game 5: Dallas Mavericks v San Antonio Spurs

In 16 of the last 17 seasons, the Mavericks have featured a 20-point-per-game scorer. Heck, a couple of those years featured two 20-point-per-game scorers.

Between Dirk Nowitzki and Michael Finley, Dallas has not lacked a clear go-to scorer.

That’s about to change – at least if Mavericks owner Cuban gets his wish.

Cuban, via Eddie Sefko of The Dallas Morning News:

“I’m not expecting anybody on our team to be a 20-point scorer,” the owner said as the Mavericks introduced six new players at a news conference. “Not Dirk. I don’t want him to be a 20-point scorer. Seriously. Monta (Ellis) has that capability. Chandler (Parsons) has that capability. Dirk has that capability. Richard Jefferson’s got that capability. Jameer (Nelson could score) 15. Raymond (Felton) could do 15, if that was the focus, but that’s not our focus.

“That’s the cool thing. There are going to be times when we overpass. And that will be the challenge.”

Since the 2000-01 season, of the 70 teams with top-five offenses each season – and that’s the type of potential these Mavericks have – 62 have produced a 20-point-per-game scorer:

(Click here to view a larger, interactive, version of the chart)


Season Team Offensive rating rank Offensive rating Scoring leader Points per game
2013-14 LAC 1 112.1 Blake Griffin 24.1
2013-14 POR 2 111.5 LaMarcus Aldridge 23.2
2013-14 DAL 3 111.2 Dirk Nowitzki 21.7
2013-14 HOU 4 111 James Harden 25.4
2013-14 MIA 5 110.9 LeBron James 27.1
2012-13 OKC 1 112.4 Kevin Durant 28.1
2012-13 MIA 2 112.3 LeBron James 26.8
2012-13 NYK 3 111.1 Carmelo Anthony 28.7
2012-13 LAC 4 110.6 Blake Griffin 18
2012-13 DEN 5 110.4 Ty Lawson 16.7
12/1/2011 SAS 1 110.9 Tony Parker 18.3
12/1/2011 OKC 2 109.8 Kevin Durant 28
12/1/2011 DEN 3 109.2 Ty Lawson 16.4
12/1/2011 LAC 4 108.5 Blake Griffin 20.7
12/1/2011 CHI 5 107.4 Derrick Rose 21.8
11/1/2010 DEN 1 112.3 Carmelo Anthony 25.2
11/1/2010 SAS 2 111.8 Tony Parker 17.5
11/1/2010 MIA 3 111.7 LeBron James 26.7
11/1/2010 HOU 4 111.3 Kevin Martin 23.5
11/1/2010 OKC 5 111.2 Kevin Durant 27.7
10/1/2009 PHO 1 115.3 Amar’e Stoudemire 23.1
10/1/2009 ATL 2 111.9 Joe Johnson 21.3
10/1/2009 DEN 3 111.8 Carmelo Anthony 28.2
10/1/2009 ORL 4 111.4 Dwight Howard 18.3
10/1/2009 TOR 5 111.3 Chris Bosh 24
9/1/2008 POR 1 113.9 Brandon Roy 22.6
9/1/2008 PHO 2 113.6 Amar’e Stoudemire 21.4
9/1/2008 LAL 3 112.8 Kobe Bryant 26.8
9/1/2008 CLE 4 112.4 LeBron James 28.4
9/1/2008 DAL 5 110.5 Dirk Nowitzki 25.9
8/1/2007 UTA 1 113.8 Carlos Boozer 21.1
8/1/2007 PHO 2 113.3 Amar’e Stoudemire 25.2
8/1/2007 LAL 3 113 Kobe Bryant 28.3
8/1/2007 GSW 4 111.8 Baron Davis 21.8
8/1/2007 NOH 5 111.5 Chris Paul 21.1
7/1/2006 PHO 1 113.9 Amar’e Stoudemire 20.4
7/1/2006 DAL 2 111.3 Dirk Nowitzki 24.6
7/1/2006 WAS 3 110.1 Gilbert Arenas 28.4
7/1/2006 UTA 4 110.1 Carlos Boozer 20.9
7/1/2006 SAS 5 109.2 Tim Duncan 19.99
6/1/2005 DAL 1 111.8 Dirk Nowitzki 26.6
6/1/2005 PHO 2 111.5 Shawn Marion 21.8
6/1/2005 SEA 3 111.1 Ray Allen 25.1
6/1/2005 DET 4 110.8 Richard Hamilton 20.1
6/1/2005 TOR 5 109.5 Chris Bosh 22.5
5/1/2004 PHO 1 114.5 Amar’e Stoudemire 26
5/1/2004 SEA 2 112.2 Ray Allen 23.9
5/1/2004 SAC 3 110.5 Peja Stojakovic 20.1
5/1/2004 DAL 4 110.3 Dirk Nowitzki 26.1
5/1/2004 MIA 5 110.2 Dwyane Wade 24.1
4/1/2003 DAL 1 112.1 Dirk Nowitzki 21.8
4/1/2003 SAC 2 110.3 Peja Stojakovic 24.2
4/1/2003 SEA 3 107.3 Ray Allen 23
4/1/2003 MIL 4 106.5 Michael Redd 21.7
4/1/2003 MIN 5 105.9 Kevin Garnett 24.2
3/1/2002 DAL 1 110.7 Dirk Nowitzki 25.1
3/1/2002 MIL 2 108.8 Ray Allen 21.3
3/1/2002 GSW 3 108.3 Antawn Jamison 22.2
3/1/2002 LAL 4 107.2 Kobe Bryant 30
3/1/2002 MIN 5 106.1 Kevin Garnett 23
2/1/2001 DAL 1 112.2 Dirk Nowitzki 23.4
2/1/2001 LAL 2 109.4 Shaquille O’Neal 27.2
2/1/2001 SAC 3 109 Chris Webber 24.5
2/1/2001 MIN 4 109 Kevin Garnett 21.2
2/1/2001 SEA 5 108.9 Gary Payton 22.1
1/1/2000 MIL 1 108.8 Ray Allen 22
1/1/2000 LAL 2 108.4 Shaquille O’Neal 28.7
1/1/2000 UTA 3 107.6 Karl Malone 23.2
1/1/2000 DAL 4 107.1 Dirk Nowitzki 21.8
1/1/2000 HOU 5 106.7 Steve Francis 19.9

Unsurprisingly, a plurality of the exceptions are Spurs teams. Gregg Popovich’s squads move the ball, spreading the scoring.

Which is exactly what Cuban wants for his Mavericks.

Friday And-1 links: Wizards reach out to Ray Allen again. Why not?

2014 NBA Finals - Practice Day And Media Availability

Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points.

• The Washington Wizards checked in again to see if Ray Allen maybe changed his mind and would want to come play for then next to Paul Pierce, reports friend-of-this-blog J. Michael of CSNWashington.com. Honestly, this isn’t going to happen. Either Allen is going to hang them up or he’s going to play for Cleveland and go for a ring. It doesn’t hurt to ask if you’re the Wizards — and it really doesn’t hurt to leak it and say to the fan base “look how hard we’re trying” — but Allen is not going to a cold weather city where the team is not a strong title contender. Sorry.

• There have been rumors of a Minnesota/Chicago trade coming out of Minnesota, Kevin Martin for Mike Dunleavy Jr./Tony Snell. There’s not enough beer at Octoberfest to make the Bulls agree to that deal.

• Good on Kevin Love for being involved in the “It’s On Us” campaign to stop sexual assault, particularly on college campuses.

• Deron Williams says the Nets are flying under the radar this season. He knows they play in Brooklyn, right?

A man has been arrested in connection with the burglary of Paul George’s home while he was playing in a playoff game last season.

• A little off topic, but a great read from a former NFL wife on what their life is like and what the teams tell them. NBA wives tell similar “just don’t disrupt or distract the team” stories.

• A Q&A with Magic rookie Elfrid Payton.

• After watching Andrew Drummond on Team USA this summer Pistons teammate Jodie Meeks said he has the goal of making the national team for the 2016 Rio Olympics. We should all dream big.

• Jonas Jerebko wants to be the stretch for the Pistons need this upcoming season. We should all dream big. (To be fair he did shoot 41.9 percent from three when he got on the court last season and if he can evolve into that role Stan Van Gundy will play him.)

• The Spurs gave a make good (training camp) contract to power forward Josh Davis, who went undrafted out of San Diego State.

• Mehmet Okur will be a special consultant for the Utah Jazz this season.