Tag: Ramon Sessions

Nick Johnson, Leandro Barbosa

Nick Johnson dunks all over Ramon Sessions (VIDEO)


Nick Johnson has some hops.

Credit Ramon Sessions for doing a good job of getting back in transition for the Kings and not just giving James Harden two easy points in transition. But he never saw Nick Johnson coming. And he ends up in a poster for it.

Harden had the last laugh, he tied the game with a three to send it to overtime, scored the first 10 points for the Rockets in the extra time, and Houston won. again

Has Kobe Bryant cost the Lakers Dwight Howard, Carmelo Anthony, Paul George and others?

FIBA Semifinals: USA v Puerto Rico

Kobe Bryant knows he’s a superstar.

He has won five championships. He ranks fifth on the NBA’s all-time scoring list. He trains at a level not even Michael Jordan matched.

The Lakers traded a quality center for him before he ever played beyond high school. They jettisoned Shaquille O’Neal for him. They gave him a huge contract extension without him even having to negotiate for it.

Based on his own talent and the Lakers’ enabling, Kobe has every reason to believe he’s above everyone else.

[ RELATED: Kobe says ESPN voters who ranked him No. 40 in NBA players are ‘idiots’ ]

That’s why he can call out the Lakers’ front office. That’s why he can make the “selfish” demand the Lakers contend the next two seasons, even if their roster is more conducive to rebuilding. That’s why he can call ESPN voters who ranked him No. 40 in the NBA “idiots.”

But that sense of entitlement has become increasingly damaging as Kobe’s production has fallen in recent years. It’s one thing for Kobe to act spoiled when he has Shaq or Gasol helping him win rings.

I don’t know if Kobe could ever do it alone, but now he’ll have to if the Lakers have a chance of winning another title.

Because he keeps alienating everybody.

Henry Abbott of ESPN has written a fantastically detailed article on the ways Kobe serves as a detriment to the Lakers. It includes several stories of players shunning the Lakers, in part, due to Kobe’s presence.

Dwight Howard is one of the most famous examples. Sure, Kobe participated in Howard’s meeting with the Lakers during free agency, but it didn’t exactly go well. Abbott:

Kupchak, Howard’s closest ally on the team, prepped the Lakers’ pitch. One big point: Listen carefully. Another: Dress appropriately. “Our approach,” a Lakers source explained at the time, “is that we are interviewing for the job. We want to show that this is a place his dreams can come true.”

As the Lakers’ contingent settled into the conference room’s ergonomic chairs, it was clear that two-time MVP point guard Steve Nash, in a nice crisp shirt, listening attentively, was running Kupchak’s game plan. But Bryant showed up, according to a person in the room, in “hoops shorts, a T-shirt and a gold chain.” He had also packed an attitude.

When Howard asked why his teammates let the injured center take all the flak when the Lakers’ season went south, Nash said he didn’t know that Howard had felt that way and that had he known, he would have acted differently. Bryant, on the other hand, offered a crash course in developing thick skin and a mini lecture on learning how to win. Sources told ESPN Insider Chris Broussard that Bryant’s lecture was “a complete turnoff” for Howard.

Apparently, Kobe didn’t learn much from that. Even when he flew back to Los Angeles this summer for Carmelo Anthony’s free-agent meeting, Kobe wasn’t prepared. Abbott:

And the particular way that recruitment was botched — Bryant made news by flying home from Europe, but somehow wires got crossed and he missed the meeting anyway — reminded Lakers insiders of the manner in which he nearly alienated Steve Nash in 2012. In the days before LA acquired Nash, sources say, the point guard wanted to hear from Bryant that the Lakers’ star was amenable to having Nash control the ball much of the time — a key tenet of the D’Antoni offense from the Suns days. When Lakers brass asked Bryant to call Nash, Bryant failed to do so, saying he preferred that Nash call him. The pettiness took days to resolve and nearly scuttled the deal.

The Lakers got Nash, though he has been too old to help much. Paul George, though, is definitely not too old. Still, Kobe’s presence interfered. Abbott:

Paul George, Angelino through and through, had once been the team’s safest choice. But sources say one reason the two-way star had re-signed with the Pacers in the fall of 2013 instead was that he was turned off by the thought that Bryant would police his efforts.

There are other examples – including Ramon Sessions – in Abbott’s article, which also contains plenty of quotes from anonymous executives and agents painting an unfavorable picture of Kobe’s people skills. It’s worth reading.

To be fair, I think some of the criticism is overblown. George, for example, would have been a restricted free agent, and the Pacers paid him more than the Lakers could have. Blaming Kobe’s presence might be an easy cover for taking the money, the most common reason players sign somewhere but one that gets poor PR.

[ RELATED: Kobe would take Iggy Azalea over Nick Young ]

There are also always agendas from anonymous sources, and I’m sure Kobe has rubbed some the wrong way. This is an easy time to kick him while he’s down.

Some players (like Darius Morris) fondly recall their time playing with Kobe. Others (like Smush Parker) do not.

The view of Kobe is clearly mixed.

However, to anyone who claims Abbott is out to get Kobe and looked only for sources who had an axe to grind, I’m certain that’s not the case. It’s far more likely Abbott holds his opinion of Kobe because of what he’s learned talking to people.

Abbott’s article provides excellent insight into why some people perceive Kobe the way they do. Whether or not you agree, it’s worth reading.

ProBasketballTalk 2014-15 Preview: Sacramento Kings

Toronto Raptors v Sacramento Kings

Last season: After Kings fans and mayor Kevin Johnson banded together to save basketball in Sacramento, new owner Vivek Ranadive brought in a new coach (Mike Malone) and a new GM (Pete D’Alessandro) and signed DeMarcus Cousins to a four-year max extension. The Kings proceeded to have a season that looked a lot like their last several — a lot of losing. A midseason trade for Rudy Gay rejuvenated the veteran forward’s career after a disappointing stint in Toronto, but it didn’t do much for the win column. The Kings finished 28-54.

Signature highlight from last season: In the most disappointing announcement-turned-April Fool’s-joke in NBA history, Cousins did not actually record an R&B album under the name “Boogie Smooth.”

Key player changes: The Kings took sharpshooter Nik Stauskas with the No. 8 pick in the draft and parted ways with point guard Isaiah Thomas, who went to Phoenix. They replaced Thomas by giving Darren Collison a three-year, $16 million deal, and signed veterans Ramon Sessions and Ryan Hollins on the cheap.

Keys to the Kings’ season:

Which of the young wings will pan out? The Kings have drafted a shooting guard in the top 10 each of the last two years. Ben McLemore was inconsistent in his rookie season and Stauskas, while a great shooter, could take time to develop other aspects of his game. In order for the Kings to progress, at least one of them has to become a dependable starter.

Will Boogie make “the leap”? Cousins played for Team USA in the FIBA World Cup this summer, and there was plenty of talk about his maturation as a leader. Plenty of players take gigantic leaps forward after playing in international competitions. Think Derrick Rose, Kevin Love and Kevin Durant after the 2010 tournament. Anthony Davis, Kyrie Irving, Klay Thompson and Kenneth Faried are expected to do the same this year, and so is Cousins. This Kings team is still rebuilding but it’s easier to do that when you have a superstar to build around.

What, exactly, is the plan here? This team is not untalented. Cousins is an All-Star-caliber player, Gay is a proven scorer, and Collison and Sessions are competent NBA point guards. Derrick Williams may still be salvageable, and second-year point guard Ray McCallum has some upside. What the Kings lack is cohesion, or any sense of what the direction of the franchise is. Obviously, Cousins is the building block, and they’d like to re-sign Gay if he keeps performing like he did after being traded to Sacramento. But other than that, so far it seems like a lot of just throwing stuff at the wall and hoping something sticks.

Why you should watch the Kings: There’s a reasonable chance Cousins could go for 30 points and 15 rebounds or get himself ejected (or both!) on any given night.

Prediction: 27-55. The Kings play in a division with at least two and maybe three playoff teams and don’t have a lot of proven talent or a roster coherent enough to make them a playoff threat of any kind. But at least they won’t be as bad as the Lakers.

Deron Williams uses multiple crossovers to get by Ramon Sessions (VIDEO)

2014 Global Games - Brooklyn Nets v Sacramento Kings

A healthy Deron Williams is one of the top point guards in the game, and when he has it going as he did in Wednesday morning’s preseason contest against the Kings, he can be extremely fun to watch.

In this play against Ramon Sessions, Williams uses three crossover dribbles to try to lose his defender, before getting all the way to the rim to score an easy two points. Sessions actually did about as good a job as possible under the circumstances, but elite offense beats elite defense every single time.

Williams finished with 13 points, five rebounds and eight assists in 25 minutes of action as the Nets beat the Kings in overtime, 129-117.

[via Marcel Mutoni]

Report: Ramon Sessions signs 2-year deal with Kings

Ramon Sessions

The Kings had a pretty good point guard in Isaiah Thomas on the roster last season, but didn’t want to pay what he would cost as a restricted free agent.

Sacramento completed a sign-and-trade to send him to Phoenix on a deal worth $27 million over four years.

Darren Collison was added in free agency, a player that the Kings believed would be an upgrade over Thomas, especially defensively. But they grabbed another veteran point guard just to make sure that depth is accounted for at the position.

From Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Free-agent guard Ramon Sessions has reached agreement on a two-year, $4.2 million deal with the Sacramento Kings, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Sessions, one of the best available players left on the market, will join free agent Darren Collison and rookie Nik Stauskas as fresh faces in the Kings’ backcourt rotation. The Kings are using the bi-annual exception provision to sign Sessions.

This is a solid signing for the Kings, and it could easily be argued that Sessions is the best point guard on the roster, and deserving of a spot in the team’s starting lineup.

Sessions spit time between Charlotte and Milwaukee last season, after being dealt from the former to the latter in a trade deadline deal. He finished out the year with the Bucks averaging 15.8 points, 3.1 rebounds and 4.8 assists in 32.5 minutes per contest.