Tag: Ramon Sessions

Shabazz Napier, Andre Miller

Report: Kings trade Ramon Sessions to Wizards, reunite Andre Miller with George Karl


George Karl is about to take over as head coach of the Kings, and he’s now got one of his favorite players from his Denver days. According to Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski, the Kings and Wizards have swapped backup point guards:

The Wizards had been looking for an upgrade on John Wall’s backup, reportedly sniffing around the likes of Norris Cole in the days leading up to the deadline. Sessions isn’t spectacular, but he’s serviceable in limited minutes, which is what the Wizards need him to be.

Miller was totally expendable for Washington, having fallen out of the rotation in favor of Garrett Temple. He was playing a career-low 12.4 minutes per game, averaging 3.6 points and 2.8 assists. It will be interesting to see how the notoriously cranky Miller, who didn’t take kindly to having his role reduced in Denver, will react to a midseason trade from a playoff contender to a lottery team. But Karl loves Miller and reportedly pushed hard to trade for him in the last week since landing the job, so he’ll definitely see some minutes. It’s a good move to help the coach get comfortable in his new job.

Report: Wizards trying to trade for Ramon Sessions

John Wall, Ramon Sessions
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The Wizards showed interest in trading for Jameer Nelson, which isn’t surprising given the state of affairs behind John Wall in Washington.

Andre Miller is losing playing time to Garrett Temple – a sign that both the 38-year-old Miller isn’t engendering much faith from Randy Wittman and the Wizards need another backup point guard.

David Aldridge of NBA.com:

Ramon Sessions was reportedly available, but that was before the Kings hired George Karl.

Jason Jones of The Sacramento Bee:


The Wizards can fit Sessions into a trade exception, but would take them over the luxury-tax line. Sessions probably isn’t worth that cost.

If they can get Sessions without surrendering much or paying the tax, the Wizards probably would. But given Karl’s faith in the point guard, it would probably take more.

Getting by with Temple and Miller isn’t the end of the world. Besides, Wall can play heavy minutes in the playoffs.

Report: Cavs in the market for a veteran backup point guard

Cleveland Cavaliers v Los Angeles Clippers

The Cleveland Cavaliers have made two major trades since the start of the season, and they might have one more move to make. Buried in this week’s NBA power rankings, Yahoo’s Marc Spears drops this nugget on the Cavs:

Knowing they are a Kyrie Irving injury from more trouble, the Cavs are working to acquire a veteran point guard.

The good news is that, unlike when they were searching for a rim protector with limited options, there are plenty of veteran point guards who could come available. The recently waived Jordan Farmar and Nate Robinson are both options. The Kings would probably be willing to part with Ramon Sessions. Ditto the Magic and Luke Ridnour. None of those players would really move the needle all that much for Cleveland, but if they’re looking for another body to protect against an Irving injury, there are guys out there.

But, of course, Kyrie Irving getting hurt probably does end the Cavs’ title hopes, which are shaky as it is. With LeBron James and Kevin Love struggling to fit together, Irving’s perimeter scoring is a much needed weapon. Take that away, and things get even dicier than they already are. Hopefully the Cavs don’t have to find out.

Rumor: Kings looking to make minor deal, Ramon Sessions available

Milwaukee Bucks v Sacramento Kings

Ramon Sessions has long been a solid reserve point guard — aggressive coming off the pick-and-roll, he knows how to get to the line and is a solid floor general. However, this year in Sacramento he has taken a step back — he is shooting just 35.3 percent, he’s getting to the line less often, and his PER has dropped to 9.6 (the kind of number that suggests he should be in the D-League).

So the Kings are testing the trade market for Sessions.

That’s the word from Jason Jones of the Sacramento Bee.

Sessions has missed the last nine games with a back issue (it will be 10 Tuesday night), he’s going to have to prove he is healthy and can still play before any team is going to express interest.

The Clippers have not been in love with the production of Jordan Farmar backing up Chris Paul. The question is would a change of setting be the answer to Session’s woes? Also, Sessions does not bring any defense to the Clippers bench. The Clippers are likely more focused on fixing their issues at the three.

As for the Kings, this kind of move is fine but they clearly have bigger questions to answer. Like who is the coach next season? And what kind of team are they trying to build, anyway?

Darren Collison, who went from hot-shot rookie to journeyman, may have found niche with Kings

Houston Rockets v Sacramento Kings

BOSTON – Darren Collison lost a job because he played well. He lost a job because he got hurt. And he lost a job because he played poorly.

The point guard has moved around the NBA at nearly an unprecedented rate for someone with his early career credentials, but maybe, just maybe, he has found a place he can stay for a while.

The Kings gave Collison a three-year, $16 million contract in free agency last summer – even though that meant casting aside incumbent starter Isaiah Thomas, a player many (myself included) thought was superior to Collison. Collison has rewarded their faith, posting career highs in points per game (16.4), assists per game (5.9) and PER (18.7).

There’s little stability in Sacramento – where the coach just got fired despite exceeding all reasonable expectations, the owner has his own crazy ideas and the franchise player is brooding – but Collison has potential to stick. His speed equips him to run the up-tempo, jazzy system Vivek Ranadivé wants, and Collison’s bond with DeMarcus Cousins gives him a powerful ally.

“The opportunity is definitely here,” Collison said last week. “It just seems like everything is all coming together. I’m more confident.”

Collison has long had reason to be confident in himself, though not always his fit with his team.

He broke in with the 2009-10 New Orleans Hornets, getting a huge opportunity when Chris Paul got hurt. In 37 starts, Collison averaged 18.8 points, shooting 48.5 percent from the field and 42.9 percent on 3-pointers, and 9.1 assists per game – All-Star-caliber numbers. Of course, no matter how well Collison played, the Hornets weren’t going to choose him over Paul.

They dealt him to Indiana, where he became a full-time starter and helped the Pacers end their longest playoff drought of his lifetime (four seasons). Reggie Miller comparisons didn’t seem outlandish. But Collison got hurt during his second season in Indiana, and George Hill Wally Pipped him in the starting lineup.

The Pacers sold low on Collison, trading him to the Mavericks. Dallas initially started Collison, but he lost the role to Dominique Jones, then Derek Fisher, then Mike James after Rick Carlisle expressed frustration with Collison’s defense. By the time the 2012-13 season ended, the Mavericks didn’t even extend Collison a qualifying offer.

He signed with the Clippers, taking a pay cut from his rookie-scale contract. Full circle, he was once again backing up and sometimes playing with Chris Paul. After the season, he opted out seeking a raise.

That’s when the Kings came calling, becoming Collison’s fifth team six seasons.

Just two other players have made an All-Rookie first team since the NBA-ABA merger and played for so many teams in their first six seasons:

  • Marc Jackson, 2001 (Warriors, Timberwolves, 76ers, New Jersey Nets, New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets)
  • Ron Mercer, 1998 (Celtics, Nuggets, Magic, Bulls, Pacers)

Jackson was out of the league one year later, and Mercer lasted only one more than that. The 27-year-old Collison certainly hopes he won’t suffer a similar fate.

That’s why Collison appreciates his opportunity in Sacramento.

“That’s all it is, really,” Collison said. “There’s a lot of good players in this league, but they don’t necessarily have the opportunity. Sometimes, they’re with a team, and they still don’t have an opportunity. They’re not going out there playing their games. I think, this year, I have a chance to do that.

“When I was with previous teams, it was hard to fit in. I couldn’t play my game, necessarily. So, this year, has been good for me.”

And good for the Kings’ offense.

They’re posting their best offensive rating relative to league average in a decade, and Collison is steering the ship.

Prior to this season, Collison has never had a dramatic effect on his teams’ offensive outputs. They’d all scored within two points per 100 possessions with him on the court as they did with him off.

But Sacramento’s offensive rating jumps from 95.6 with him off to 107.8 with him on.


Some of that success can be chalked up to Collison spending most of his minutes with Cousins, Sacramento’s top player. But credit Collison for quickly learning how to play with the star center. Cousins scores better by volume (26.8 to 24.2 points per 36 minutes) and efficiency (51.7 to 46.4 field-goal percentage) when Collison is on the court rather than off.

The key to meshing with Cousins?

“Give him the ball, and let him work,” Collison said. “…It’s that easy.”

Collison’s deferential attitude aside, he’s not merely riding Cousins’ coattails. When the center missed 10 straight games with viral meningitis, the Kings still scored much better with Collison on the court than off (103.7 to 94.7 points per 100 possessions).

In fact, pair Collison with any teammate, and the Kings score better with Collison on the court. Here’s Sacramento’s offensive rating with each player and Collison on the court (purple) and off the court (black), sorted by minutes played with Collison:


(Eric Moreland, who barely played before suffering a season-ending injury, is excluded from the visualization.)

Player Min. with Collison Min. without Collison Off. rating with Collison Off. rating without Collison Diff.
Rudy Gay 966 200 109.1 99.0 +10.1
Ben McLemore 874 254 108.5 95.5 +13.0
Jason Thompson 682 157 105.1 91.9 +13.2
DeMarcus Cousins 550 195 111.9 98.6 +13.3
Carl Landry 263 358 103.7 92.8 10.9
Reggie Evans 238 185 105.7 96.0 +9.7
Derrick Williams 206 243 111.3 98.4 +12.9
Omri Casspi 155 300 108.6 96.0 +12.6
Ryan Hollins 144 58 98.1 83.6 +14.5
Nik Stauskas 141 330 105.4 96.1 +9.3
Ray McCallum 71 205 110.7 91.7 +19
Ramon Sessions 33 394 107.4 97.4 +10
Eric Moreland 1 1 200.0 166.7 +33.3

At some point, the common denominator becomes clear: Collison.

He knocks down pull-up jumpers from mid-range, not exactly an analytical hotbed, but a part of the floor that opens thanks to his pick-and-roll probing. He has improved working off the ball, spotting up for corner 3s. And he keeps the ball moving.

In a conference where half the Kings’ opponents start a former All-Star at point guard, Collison doesn’t exactly stand out. But he’s brining credibility to the position in Sacramento.

“He’s comfortable,” Kings coach Tyrone Corbin said. “He’s gotten his confidence back. His speed, pushing the ball down the floor. He knows he’s going to be on the floor for a certain amount of minutes, so he’s relaxed and just playing at a pace that’s favorable to his style of play.”

It’d be foolish to say Collison, just 31 games into his Sacramento tenure, has found a home. His previous teams have struggled to determine whether he should start or come off the bench for fair reasons, and toeing that line has made him expendable.

But this season, Collison is showing he’s a quality starter.

“This year, I definitely proved that,” Collison said. “So, now, it’s not even about proving to be a good starter. It’s about leading the team now.”