Tag: Rajon Rondo

Los Angeles Lakers v Denver Nuggets

Report: Jameer Nelson opting out with Nuggets


Jameer Nelson signed with the Mavericks last summer, surely hoping to join a contender.

Nelson surprisngly won the starting job, and Dallas started 19-8. Its offense scored at an all-time great clip with Nelson on the floor.

But the Mavericks traded Nelson for Rajon Rondo, and the Celtics flipped Nelson to the Nuggets.

A season that began starting for top team ended with Nelson playing a limited role on an also-ran.

So, he’s going try free agency again.

Shams Charania of RealGM:

Denver Nuggets guard Jameer Nelson is planning to opt out of his $2.85 million player option for the 2015-16 season to enter free agency, league sources told RealGM.

Nelson might not get the $2,854,940 he would’ve made next season by opting in.

He’s a solid backup, but at age 33, slippage is showing. He can make jumpers and pass reasonably well, but he’s a defensive liability. Rebuilding teams won’t have much interest, and contenders might not allocate much money for him. The league is flooded with point guards right now.

Nelson’s minimum salary is $1,499,187, and it wouldn’t be surprising if he has to settle for that. It also wouldn’t be surprising if he gets around the amount he was due.

This is a financial risk for Nelson. But at least he’ll get to pick his team – until Dec. 15, when players who signed the previous summer can be traded, as he knows all too well.

Chandler Parsons recruiting Patrick Beverley to Mavericks

Gal Mekel,Patrick Beverley

Chandler Parsons said he was ready to recruit free agent to the Mavericks.

Unless Parsons has gone rogue, Dallas hopes to poach another Rocket – Patrick Beverley.

Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle:

With Pat Beverley heading into free agency, the Rockets point guard said he is already seeing the renowned recruiting talents of former teammate Chandler Parsons first hand.

“I hear from Chandler every day,” Beverley said. “It’s hard, but I try not to think about it. I can’t talk about contracts. It’s going to be a fun summer. I have put myself in a position to be set for life and that’s something that I never thought was possible growing up.”

Beverley would be an excellent fit with the Mavericks.

The Rockets exposed Dallas’ defensive holes in the playoffs, and Beverley would at least fill one. As the Rajon Rondo experiment and subsequent success showed, Rick Carlisle’s system works better with a point guard who can make 3s and doesn’t dominate the ball. That’s Beverley.

How much money would the Mavericks offer Beverley, who will be a restricted free agent?

Al-Farouq Aminu will definitely opt out, and last check had Monta Ellis doing the same. Let’s assume they both do. Let’s also assume Dallas renounces all its free agents and waives Dwight Powell, who has an unguaranteed salary.

Using data from Basketball Insiders, the Mavericks would project to have about $30.9 million in cap space.

A max contract for DeAndre Jordan (who’s reportedly interested in Dallas) or LaMarcus Aldridge would start at about $19 million. With or without one of those top free agents, Dallas would lose cap space by re-signing any of its own free agents like Ellis, Aminu and/or Tyson Chandler.

The Mavericks have room to chase Beverley. It just limits their flexibility elsewhere.

Dallas probably must offer more than $10 million per season to convince Houston not to match.

Because Beverley has been in the league three seasons, the Gilbert Arenas Provision does not apply. A team can sign him to an offer sheet worth up to a max contract, and it can’t balloon like the Omer Asik and Jeremy Lin deals.

The Rockets definitely value Beverley. But as the Parsons saga showed last year, they might place more value in the flexibility to chase a third star to complement James Harden and Dwight Howard.

I hope Dallas chases Beverley – to see how he’d fit in the Mavericks’ system, to see how Houston would build its roster and to see one more Mark Cuban-Daryl Morey clash.

Mitch Kupchak: Lakers “don’t have time” to build through the draft

Mitch Kupchak

In a little over a month, the Lakers will be selecting second overall in the NBA Draft. The player they take, whether it be Jahlil Okafor, Karl-Anthony Towns, D’Angelo Russell or someone else, is someone they will hope to be the post-Kobe Bryant face of the franchise. Beyond that, though, the word is that the Lakers are done trying to slowly acquire talent.

Here’s what GM Mitch Kupchak told Bleacher Report Radio on Sunday about the team’s mindset following two straight years missing the playoffs:

The Lakers are going to have max-level cap space this summer, which they’ll use to chase a top-tier free agent, whether that be Rajon Rondo, Kevin Love or LaMarcus Aldridge. This has been their strategy for the last year: they went hard after Carmelo Anthony last summer and attempted to reach out to LeBron James and Chris Bosh during free agency, although they didn’t get far with either one.

With the Kobe Bryant era drawing to a close (Kupckak reiterated in the same interview that the Lakers are proceeding as though 2015-16 would be Bryant’s final year), the Lakers don’t have a clear direction going forward. They’ll get Julius Randle back from the leg injury that kept him out all but one game of his rookie season, and paired with whoever they take in next month’s draft, that’s a solid young foundation.

But that won’t be enough to win in the crowded Western Conference, at least not for a while. They’ll need to add talent to put around them, and the quickest way to do that is through free agency. After missing the playoffs two years in a row, the historically dominant Lakers are anxious to get back to being relevant.

The Lakers’ hands are also sort of tied when it comes to building through the draft. They still owe next year’s pick to the Sixers, unless it falls in the top three. Even if they wanted to build through the draft, they don’t have any more first-round picks after this year until 2017.

With that said, Kupchak’s “don’t have time” wording is questionable. If it were any other franchise than the Lakers or the Knicks, it would be assumed that the road to contention would take several years of developing talent. But the Lakers pride themselves on being a consistently championship-level organization, and missing the playoffs two years in a row has been tough on them, so their mentality is not going to change.

And if the Lakers get a star free agent, that’s great. But if they don’t, they could be in for another several years of disappointment relative to expectations.