Tag: Players Assoication

CBA negotiations gap not about the goals, just how to get there


Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Nba_logo.pngIn the NFL, teams go from the middle of the pack to Super Bowl contenders overnight seemingly every year. The league thrives in part because on any given Sunday any team can beat any other team.

We could all list five NBA teams (maybe three) and say, “The NBA champions will come out of this group” and know we will be right.

When the owners and Players Association sat down in New York for negotiations yesterday, both sides agreed that there needs to be more competitive balance in the league, according to Ken Berger of CBSSports.com. In fact, there were a number of things the two sides did agree upon.

Now, how to fix those problems is where the differences are, that is where the gap starts to look like a gulf.

The players believe many of the owners’ woes can be solved through broader revenue sharing, for which they included a plan in their proposal. The owners continue to believe that how the owners divvy up hundreds of millions in annual losses doesn’t solve the problem that expenses are too high. According to sources, the owners seem to be hunkered down in their pursuit of shorter contracts with less guaranteed money – and they appear to be focusing on those issues even more than reducing the 57 percent share of basketball-related income (BRI) that the players receive. In the owners’ view, shorter contracts and the ability to restructure them midway through – a provision that exists in the NFL’s CBA – would help teams become more competitive faster.

Of course, the truth lies somewhere in the middle. The owners have to do something about revenue sharing — and they say they are going to, but it is a separate issue from the CBA talks. It’s not. When the Lakers pull in nearly $2 million from each home game and the Memphis Grizzlies less than $400,000, the playing field is not level, not even close (and that doesn’t even discuss local television revenue). All of that impacts player salaries and player movement (two big issues for the owners).

On the flip side, why can’t there be a buyout after three seasons of any deal that goes five or six years? Or maybe after four seasons? Have the buyout at some percentage of the deal (50 percent, 33 percent, whatever) so that teams can restructure and rebuild more quickly.

One other real potential sticking point according to Berger is the owners are looking for ways to limit player movement in the wake of this past summer’s free agent market. You can bet that is one place the players will not move easily from.

Regardless of the amount of the payroll decline, one team executive said owners were rattled by the bold free-agent coup pulled off by star players this summer – with James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh teaming up in Miami – and have become focused on limiting player movement as a result. Any efforts to curb players’ free-agent rights would be staunchly opposed by the union. But there is a real sense from the owners, according to this executive, that they’re determined to write provisions into the new CBA that would provide stronger disincentives for free agents to leave their teams.

The word lockout was used a lot less in Thursday’s negotiation than it had been in Dallas at the All-Star Weekend talks. But it doesn’t make the likelihood of it any less real.

Owners, players have "amicable" meeting on a new CBA, but that is different than progress


Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Nba_logo.pngUPDATE 3:50 pm: Both sides came out of the meeting saying things were better. Not good, but better, particularly the tone. Here is their joint released statement:

“The NBA and NBPA held a four-hour bargaining meeting today that included constructive dialogue and a productive exchange of information.  While we still have much work to do, it was encouraging how many players and owners participated in the process and all pledged to continue to work together. We all agreed to meet again before training camp.”

David Stern said there was “a gap, not a gulf” according to CBSSports.com’s Ken Berger. Players Association Executive Director Billy Hunter told him that the two sides were talking to each other, not at each other, which is a start.

It’s also a long way from a deal.

2:50 pm: The owners negotiating committee and representatives of the NBA Players Association sat down for a three-and-a-half hour meeting on a new Collective Bargaining Agreement Thursday in Manhattan.

The good news, according to CBSSports.com’s Ken Berger — nobody went Matt Barnes and started giving Mark Cuban love taps. Berger’s source told him this meeting was “more amicable” than the last one All-Star Weekend.

The bad news — the two sides are nowhere near a deal. Not even close.

All the big names were there. For the players LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane Wade and more showed up to put on a front of solidarity. For the owners, most of the negotiating team was there but not Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert, who apparently wasn’t in the mood to sit down and talk to LeBron yet.

The owners are pushing for a radical change in how the NBA’s financial structure — a hard salary cap, shorter contracts with not all of them guaranteed, some restrictions on player movement and more.

The players basically like things the way they are now.

The two sides do not even agree on the financial state of the league. The owners say they are losing money, $370 million last season according to David Stern. The players look at the recent free agent spending spree and the people lined up to bid on franchises for sale and question if things are really that bad.

Whatever they talked about for more than three hours in Manhattan, neither side was moving off their basic principles, which are so diametrically opposed. The current CBA can run for another couple years but the owners can —
and will — opt out of it by the end of this year and force a new CBA for next season.

I’ll say again — we are headed to a lockout next summer. This is not a maybe thing if you talk to people in NBA front offices. Everybody on both sides privately expects it. The only question is will it cost regular season games and if so how many.