Tag: Philadelphia Sixers

So, the Sixers are trying Evan Turner out at point guard. Yeah, it blows our mind, too.


I’m not going to waste your time with a workup of an intro. Let’s just get into the meat on this one, okay? The Sixers were in training camp and put Evan Turner and Lou Williams in the backcourt for the second team. Makes sense. You would have thought Turner might wind up on the first team with Iggy sliding down to 3, but apparently not, and that’s cool. However Doug Collins wants his show, you know?

But what’s crazy is that the backcourt was struggling with Williams on-ball and Turner off. From the Philadelphia Inquirer, this gem from Doug Collins:

“What I saw was when Lou and Evan were together, when Lou was on the ball and Evan was off, they struggled, because Evan wasn’t sure and Lou didn’t do a very good job of getting us into our stuff,” Collins said. “Then we moved Evan to the ball and moved Lou and they both were good. So you can see where they’re most comfortable right now.

“What we’re doing with Evan is we’re mixing and matching him so he can do a little of both. But, at the end of the day, Lou’s a scorer and that’s what we’re going to have to do, put him in those kinds of positions ’cause if we put him out there to run the team, it really takes away what he does best.

I did not see that coming. I mean, sure, Turner has the potential, but he went from a 3/2 to a 2/3 and now to a 2/1 or 1/2. That’s dizzying. It’s an intriguing idea, though, considering Turner does have scoring ability through the roof but also had great assist and rebounding numbers at Ohio State. With better teammates, working him as a creator on-ball might be the best option. It goes to show how Collins is getting outside the box with the kid’s development and honestly, breathes a bit of light into a franchise that’s on unstable ground as it enters the season.

Can’t wait to see this thing in function, if they stick with it.

Sixers deny any serious Carmelo Anthony talks

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Thumbnail image for anthony_high5.jpgYesterday we told you about rumors of a complex, still-in-discussions trade involving the Nets, Sixers and Nuggets in an effort to grant Carmelo Anthony a one-way ticket out of Denver.

Except the Sixers say they are not playing that game.

The original report came from the Ken Berger at CBSSports, but the Philadelphia Inquirer asked Sixers sources and they said there’s nothing there.

According to one Sixers front-office source, the team is “not in any discussions at all” regarding a potential three-way trade involving the Denver Nuggets and New Jersey Nets. In a scenario reported Wednesday by Ken Berger of cbssports.com, the Sixers would consider trading the expiring contracts of Jason Kapono and Willie Green along with the talent of Thaddeus Young and Iguodala to the Nuggets for superstar Carmelo Anthony.

The same source said that while the trade has been discussed internally “a little,” the franchise believes it has no real shot at Anthony, who has said he would agree to be traded to the Nets, Knicks, Magic, or Bulls.

It looks like we’re still at square one with the Carmelo Anthony deal — he has leverage in this because no team is going to trade for him if he won’t sign an extension with them. Three parties — the two teams and Anthony — are all going to have to agree on any trade, and that takes time to put together. More like February trading deadline than before the season starts. Besides, the Nuggets need to really sell to fans that they tried to keep him.

Doug Collins' novel idea: Get Andre Iguodala to attack the rim

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Thumbnail image for iguodala_game.jpgLast season, Andre Iguodala took as many three-point shots a game (3.7 on average) as he did shots at the rim (3.9). The Princeton offense had him floating around on the perimeter and creating a lot of his own shots.

Anyone who watched Team USA this summer knows that when he attacks the rim, Iggy is a beast. Frankly, anybody that has watched him play ever knows that. My mom knows that. But just for some further evidence, last season Iguodala shot 30.9 percent from three and 68.5 percent at the rim.

So new Sixers coach Doug Collins had this novel idea. Iguodala explained it to the Philadelphia Inquirer’s online blog.

“I think Coach [Collins] is going to be able to do the job of putting me in a position to attack more, where I won’t have to exert energy on the perimeter,” Iguodala said. “Last year our offense had me outside the perimeter. I shot a lot of threes, but it wasn’t my intention to do that. I’m going to attack the rim more this season.”

That’s so crazy it just might work.

The goal is to get Iguodala moving toward the rim. Last season on isolation plays Iggy shot 35 percent and created 0.78 points per possession. But when he was cutting to the rim it was 83 percent and 1.41 per possession. In transition it was 69 percent, off offensive rebounds it was 63 percent.

The Sixers have Jrue Holiday and Evan Turner to create shots. They have a team of athletes that can run. They have Thaddeus Young. The Sixers should be more dynamic than they are.

Collins gets that, you can bet the offense will try to take advantage of these athletes. Which is a good thing, because it’s far more fun to watch Iguodala go to the rack than float around the arc.

Anthony still wants out in Denver, but deals to move him are complex

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Thumbnail image for carmello.anthony.2.jpgIt’s really a two-step process for the Nuggets to move on and trade Carmelo Anthony. And while most of us are having fun playing around with step two, the Nuggets still seem to be on step one.

Step one: Accept that he is going to leave and that you have to trade him. Step two: Find a deal that works.

Nuggets officials still seem to be dealing with step one — they think they have a shot to convince Anthony to stay. To sign the three-year, $65 million deal that is out on the table. Look at what coach George Karl told the Denver Post:

“To me, my job is to, anytime I talk to Melo . . . it’s to convince him that we won 53 games last year and I think we’re very capable of being a lot better than we were last year,” Karl told reporters. “Some of the bombs that hit our team injury-wise and my situation, I think we kind of need to stay together, in my opinion. It’s pretty easy: Stay together and figure it out. Right now, I don’t think Melo is going to be calling me for advice. Fortunately, it’s not my job to probably call him to talk about that situation. My job is to talk about basketball.”

How’s that going? Here’s what CBSSports.com’s Ken Berger got from people “involved in the process” and clearly close to Anthony.

“There’s no sign of reconsideration on Carmelo’s part, despite what [Denver] has publicly said,” said one of the people involved in the process.

Denver officials may or may not be coming around to accepting that they will lose him — officially they are still turning away trade calls — but this topic will be a massive distraction during training camp and into the season if Denver doesn’t move him. It is a question that will come up in every city, in seemingly every story about the team.

But Berger also shows how hard it is to put together a fair deal for Anthony.

He talks about a complex three-team idea involving New Jersey and Philadelphia that would ultimately send Anthony to the Nets, No. 3 pick Derrick Favors to Philadelphia and Andre Iguodala to Denver. But there are a lot of other moving parts to make the salaries work, and Rod Thorn in Philadelphia may realize he is trading Iguodala ad getting back a project in Favors. Anthony likely would sign an extension with the Brooklyn-bound Nets but wherever he gets traded has to be to a team where he would sign. Nobody is just going to rent him.

Getting a deal done will be hard, but eventually Denver will come around and realize it has no choice. Unless it wants to repeat the fun in Cleveland. Or Toronto, where new Nuggets GM Masai Ujiri came from — doubt he wants to see that movie twice.

Iverson's manager "shocked" no team has contacted him


Thumbnail image for iverson_sixers.jpgThere was a time when Allen Iverson filled arenas to see him play, when he was the player symbolizing the bridge to the hip-hop culture in the NBA, when his jersey sales were at the top of the league, when he was one of the most dynamic players in the NBA.

That was a decade ago. Today’s Iverson can’t get an NBA team to even call him. He is contemplating playing in China next season, but his personal manager Gary Moore said he was stunned by this development.

“We’re very astonished, to say the least, that not one team has contacted us with any interest,” Moore said. “I just don’t understand it….

“What has Allen Iverson done to not warrant interest in him?” Moore said.

Well, um, there was last season.

He put up good stats for the Grizzlies in the three games he played for them — 12.3 points per game and a PER of 16.9 — but was such a distraction, refusing to come off the bench and throwing Mike Conley under the bus, that they let him go. (Memphis had a good season and good chemistry once Iverson was gone.) He went back to Philadelphia where he was pedestrian for 25 games then had to leave the team to deal with a family issue — a legitimate issue but the timing and how it was handled left other teams questioning.

At age 35, no team trying to build wants and aging Iverson to take up a roster spot and no veteran contending team feels he’s worth the risk. We can tell you there is no buzz whatsoever for Iverson around the league. Nobody feels the production is worth the hassle.

So maybe that’s how one of the NBA’s legendary careers ends. With a whimper. Playing in China against Stephon Marbury. I wish it was different, but that is the reality.