Tag: Phil Jackson

Dallas Mavericks v Los Angeles Lakers - Game One

Phil Jackson talks in a Zen way about new Lakers


What Phil Jackson did as a coach better than any coach ever was get players to believe in their roles. Not simply just know, but fully and totally believe in that role and its place in the team dynamic. He often did it by guidance and letting the players discover this for themselves — the lessons you learn that way rather than have explained to you stick.

If you think that is easy, look at the track records of other coaches who have won titles and tried to win multiple with the same group.

So it should be no shock that when Jackson went on ESPNRadio in Chicago and was asked about these Lakers, he talked in terms of blending Steve Nash, Dwight Howard, Pau Gasol and Kobe Bryant together. Thanks to Mark Medina of the Los Angeles Times for the transcription.

“It’s finding a role that each player can move towards and be comfortable in,” Jackson said. “I think that’s how you want to feel. You want Steve to have the ability to have the ball with confidence that he is doing the right thing and feeling like he can run the team and getting the ball to Kobe in critical situations is important because that’s what his best role is standing out in the moments of crisis or the moments that are critical. And the inclusion that you have to have to make Howard feel a part of it. So all those guys have to find a little role….

“(Nash) is a guy that can kinda make it easier for Howard to be a player inside,” Jackson said. “As Pau can move around in the post and move up to the high post and he can be an outside defender that can help out in a variety of screen-roll activities that maybe Howard might get himself in foul trouble having to defend all the time. So they’ll be able to do a lot of things with a more mobile and quicker Pau Gasol. This is a team that you have to find an offense that is going to work and include everybody because Kobe dominates the ball and Steve Nash dominates the ball.”

What Jackson is pointing out will be one of the keys for the Lakers this season — Pau Gasol and Dwight Howard are two of the best pick-and-roll defending big men in the game and that is going to make it tough on other teams that live and die by that play.

If Phil Jackson were in charge of this team, is there any doubt they would blend together?

Can Mike Brown do that? If this were a younger Lakers team I’d be more concerned, but with the veterans they have I think the Lakers will come together. They will figure out how to work the hybrid Princeton offense and new defensive sets.

Maybe the best question after the way Brown leaned on Kobe and Gasol last season is if he cannot wear them out during the regular season.

Phil Jackson says “Jordan Rules” book helped Bulls win

Jordan celebration Ehlo

Sam Smith is going to receive the 2012 Curt Gowdy Media Awards from the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame next week, honoring one of the great journalists ever to ply his craft following the NBA.

He covered the Chicago Bulls for years, for the Chicago Tribune and now for the Bull’s official site. He was the go-to source for Bulls information during the Jordan years, the one guy willing to be honest about the stars and team in a pre-Internet era.

But that’s not why you remember him, you remember him for The Jordan Rules.

That was the book that came out not long after the Bulls had won their first title and pulled back the curtain on Michael Jordan, a guy who up to then had not faced a ton of critical coverage (aside questions of if he could win the big one… seriously). The book exposed Jordan’s bullying ways with teammates in a less than flattering portrayal. It was controversial.

And Phil Jackson thinks it might have helped the Bulls win more titles.

While Jordan had taken some steps toward trusting his teammates he needed to take more if the Bulls were to become a dynasty and not a one-hit wonder. Jackson, speaking to Bulls.com about Sam Smith, said the book helped in that regard.

“I knew it was going to be controversial and Sam had kind of warned me,” said Jackson of The Jordan Rules. “It was an inside look at the team and about the dynamics and the characteristics of our leader, Michael Jordan. Not everybody was going to be happy with it, I knew that…

Between Jordan’s spectacular abilities and the emergence of Scottie Pippen, the Bulls were poised to make a long run. But without Jordan coming around to rely on his teammates, it is possible the Bulls would never have gotten to that point. Jackson believes Smith’s book played a role in Jordan backing off his so-called supporting cast, as well as allowing the coaches to more effectively restore a level of order and maintain control of the team.

“That was probably a part of the dynamic,” said Jackson. “There were a lot of things that contributed to that. I think one of them was Michael playing in a system in which he had to form-fit himself into a group. He had to start trusting his teammates, which came from the appreciation of their individual skills and abilities. Finally, some of the shine came off the idolatry and the unbelievable press Michael got his first four or five years of his career where he could do everything from sew to cook.”

Read the entire interview, it is fascinating. Smith started covering the team when NBA teams still flew commercial airlines (now teams have private chartered jets). That meant journalists were on the same team, got to talk to players in a casual setting, and got a better feel for team dynamics than now when media availability is limited (and team PR personnel are ever vigilant).

Jackson admits that a lot of what was in Jordan Rules rung true. And in the end, that might have been good for the Bulls.

Kobe says even 2004 title could not have kept Shaq/Kobe Lakers together

Lakers v Nets

It was the conventional wisdom at the time that if the Lakers had won the 2004 NBA title — they lost in the finals to the Detroit Pistons and their stifling defense — that Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal would have stuck it out together to chase more titles. The “winning cures all ills” theory.

Kobe says not so fast.

Speaking with Yahoo’s Graham Bensinger in a must-watch interview for Kobe fans, the star said it was over when he heard chatter out of Shaq’s camp that Kobe couldn’t win without Shaq.

“It just wasn’t going to work. It wasn’t in the cards,” Bryant said. “There’s things that I wanted to do with my career and take my career to another level, that I was just incapable of doing as long as we were playing together….

“It just wasn’t going to work, so no matter what happened, even if we had won that championship, me being a free agent, there was just no way.”

Kobe took — and in some quarters still takes — some grief for breaking up those Lakers. But the fact is what Kobe did because he had the hammer of free agency was exactly what Shaq would have done if he had that hammer. They were done with it. Phil Jackson couldn’t keep them together. So Buss made the only logical choice and traded Shaq, convincing Kobe to re-sign. You always choose the younger player with the better work ethic and who took better physical care of himself.

Kobe also sounded sympathetic to the place Jackson was in with that three-peat team.

“The relationship between me and Shaq,” Kobe said. “Him having to deal with that relationship and kind of keeping me at arm’s distance so that, in turn, it can bring him closer to Shaq. And he was dealing with a young racehorse that wanted to get to an elite level very fast… we all three are very stubborn. “”

Kobe said his relationship with Jackson needed to be repaired when Phil came back to the Lakers. It was a matter of communication styles.

“I said, ‘Phil, if you want me to do something, just tell me.’” Kobe said. “He kind of likes subtly slipping messages in there. Where, for me, it’s like just tell me what it is you want. Don’t insult my intelligence by trying to backdoor in there.”

Report: Thunder and Brooks closing in on new deal

Scott Brooks

You should not be surprised by this.

ESPN reports that the Oklahoma City Thunder are “closing in” on a new deal with head coach Scott Brooks:

Sources told ESPN.com on Friday night that Brooks and the Thunder, after slow-moving talks that had left the sides well apart by the end of the NBA Finals earlier this month, soon will finalize a new four-year deal to follow up the contract that expires Saturday.

Although the financial specifics were not yet known, ESPN.com reported last week that the Thunder’s most recent offer was “north of $4 million” annually.

“They are getting close,” one source briefed on the discussions said.

via Oklahoma City Thunder, coach Scott Brooks close to new contract, sources say – ESPN.

So, no, Phil Jackson will not be enjoying the Sooner State’s sights and sounds any time soon.

The Thunder were not going to let the coach that lead them to the Finals get away, no matter their resistance to overpaying for him. Brooks comes with questions, that can’t be denied. Tactically, there are issues, but at the same time, Brooks has overseen the development of two All-Stars, the Sixth Man of the Year, and the Defensive Player of the Year runner-up. It’s just too absurd to think that they would allow him to walk away.

In the end, the Thunder will wind up caving on both the number of years and the amount per year. That was always going to happen. This isn’t new stuff. Coaches, particularly, younger ones, have a hard time getting the mega-deals. But OKC wasn’t going to go in another direction, wasn’t going to risk upsetting the good thing they have going.

Brooks will be back in OKC, and the process will continue. And so will people questioning whether he’s the guy to get it done.

Thunder GM calls idea of Jackson, Van Gundy as coach “rubbish”

Oklahoma City Thunder v Miami Heat - Game Four

When we told you this rumor was out there — that Phil Jackson and Jeff Van Gundy were on the list as potential coaches of the Thunder if Scott Brooks wasn’t brought back — we told you to take it with a grain of salt. Or, actually an entire box of kosher salt (we only use the good stuff).

Now comes this from Thunder general manager Sam Presti, speaking to the Associated Press.

“To me, it’s rubbish,” Presti said Sunday when asked about an ESPN report that Jackson and Van Gundy were being considered as options if Brooks couldn’t be re-signed….

“Scotty is an integral part of our organization and critical to our success,” Presti said. “We value him greatly and we’re looking forward to having those (contract) conversations, as he said, in the coming days. He’s been integral to our success. We wouldn’t be the situation that we’re in without him and his commitment to our organization and our players.”

First off, “rubbish” is a great word. We should all use it more in our daily lives.

This always sounded like a leak to try and put some pressure on the Brooks camp more than reality.

Jackson was never going to happen. Not in this organization. Here’s the thing, Phil Jackson doesn’t just come in and coach, he takes over the entire organization — he is the mouthpiece of the franchise, you need to bring in players that fit his system, he changes the entire dynamic. The Thunder don’t need a new dynamic — they just reached the finals with a team core that is 23. You listen to the Heat players after their finals win and to a man they said they thought if they meet the Thunder in the finals next year or in two years they will be much, much harder to beat. This is a growing team on a good path. You bring in Jackson you change everything — yes, he has a track record of winning, but why change what is already working?

Jeff Van Gundy is a big name, he would help the Thunder defense, but he is also very, very expensive (as is Jackson.).

The Thunder players believe in Brooks. The Thunder players play hard for him every game. And while he seemed unsure of how to counter the Heat with lineup adjustments in the finals, in the round before he made the adjustments that beat Gregg Popovich. Again, this is not the time to make the change.

Brooks and the Thunder will get a deal done. He will be back next year. Everything else you hear is negotiations.