Tag: Phil Jackson


The Mavericks have a plan to get Lamar Odom up to speed and out of the Triangle


Lamar Odom has been terrible as a Dallas Maverick. 4-27 from the field bad. Halved production per 36 minutes bad. Outright disaster bad. But it’s early, and he’s adapting to a new system and new teammates after a lot of years under Phil Jackson and the triangle in L.A. More than that, though, he’s been in poor conditioning. (Something something, too many Skittles.)

But the Mavericks have a plan!

From the Dallas Morning News:

Lamar Odom has been placed on the industrial-strength remedial course for improved physical conditioning, following in the footsteps of Peja Stojakovic and a few other players during the Rick Carlisle coaching tenure.

It’s not really anything special, but it is designed to get Odom back up to game speed, which he and the coach have said is lacking.

“There’s an action plan in place, and he’s working [hard],” Carlisle said. “He came in this [Friday] morning and worked for an hour and a half. He’s got a ways to go, but he’s a willing worker. He was behind when he got here condition-wise. But we’ll get him caught up.”

The plan for extra workouts to improve conditioning worked wonders for Stojakovic, although he also was fighting through a back injury for which he needed extra work. Odom has said it will simply take some time for him to get where he needs to be physically.

“He’s got to find his way within our team. We’re a free-flowing team. We don’t do much play-calling. There’s going to be a curve there. But that doesn’t affect how you run back and whether you’re in a stance or block somebody out, that kind of stuff. Let’s get to that, and then the other stuff will fall into place.”

via Lamar Odom’s conditioning lacking; Mavs have plan to get him up to game speed | Dallas Mavericks Blog | Sports News | News for Dallas, Texas | The Dallas Morning News.

The last part is intriguing, as it raises questions about the impact of playing in the Triangle for Phil Jackson. Odom struggled before winding up in L.A. due to his mind-wandering ways. But the Triangle, which allows a fair amount of decision making, but within a framework, allowed him to thrive. If A, then B, if not A, then C or D. (I’m not a Triangle expert or anything, but the gist is that there’s a framework and it’s not the easiest thing for a lot of players to get, which makes the collection of players Jackson has gotten to buy in all the more impressive.) A more improvisational Dallas offense may feed into Odom’s two worst sides on the basketball floor: the side that tends to zone out and disappear, and the side that tries to do too much with freedom.

Carlisle has never really had a player who couldn’t contribute inside his system; DeShawn Stevenson was a pivotal player for God’s sake. But Odom’s a special challenge. The Mavericks are committed to making it work though, and it’s good that they’re putting in the effort to meet him halfway.

Quote of the day: Phil Jackson pretty much predicted the CP3 situation a year ago

Kobe Bryant And Phil Jackson Address The Media

Via a Kevin Ding article from December 29th, 2010, here’s Phil Jackson on the troubles the league-owned Hornets might run into:

The [Hornets] were recently bought by the NBA, which prompted Jackson to say: “Not happy about that.”

Jackson put forth a scenario where Hornets star Chris Paul might revive his demand for a trade, and Jackson wondered how the league could manage being the one deciding which other franchise would get Paul.

“Who’s going to pull the button on it?” Jackson asked. “When Chris says he has to be traded, how’s that going to go? … Someone’s going to have to make a very nonjudgmental decision on that part that’s not going to irritate anyone else in the league.”

Not bad, Mr. Jackson. I get the feeling this is one of those days where Phil Jackson is very much enjoying retirement.

Shaq plays down spat with Kobe, calls death threat “Ebonics”

Image (1) Shaq and Kobe-thumb-275x260-13925.jpg for post 2602

Thanks to the NBA lockout and the dearth of new news, let’s talk about the Shaquille O’Neal vs. Kobe Bryant feud that is almost a decade old again….

A few weeks back we told you about the parts of Shaq’s new book where he gave his account of his fights with Kobe and, how after Phil Jackson asked them to stop pissing on each other in the media and Kobe then did an interview with Jim Gray, Shaq threatened to kill him.

But, you know, that’s just a figure of speech.

That’s basically what Shaq told Stephen A. Smith on ESPN radio (via Eye on Basketball).

“That [threat] happened back then,” O’Neal said. “It’s well-documented. It’s like an Ebonics statement. I’ve wanted to kill you many times, Stephen A. But we’re still cool….

“Leadership styles vary when you’re dealing with tasks or relationships,” O’Neal said. “I was more task-oriented. With me being the leader of the team, me being the CEO, everything had to go my way. Sometimes when you focus on the tasks, the relationship dwindles. It was all a respect thing. The task was completed. We won three out of four, we were the most dominant, most controversial duo ever created. That’s all that matters.”

While one could suggest that Shaq was trying to settle some old scores and smack Kobe for how everything went down, Shaq said that was not the case.

“I’m a businessman, I don’t take anything personal,” O’Neal claimed. “A lot of the stuff was you [media] guys trying to get in. He’d say something to one guy and he’d write it. I’d say something to another guy, they’d write it. At times it was fun for me. You have to understand one thing about me, I always knew what I was doing. Everything I do has always been calculated.”


There is something about teams that fight off the field or court and still win on it we find fascinating as a sports culture. Billy Martin’s Oakland A’s… or his Yankees, or pretty much anywhere he went. Now it’s Shaq and Kobe. There have been others, there will be more, but it’s interesting that we are drawn to it.

As for Kobe and Shaq: Not to go all Dave Mason on you but there ain’t no good guy, there ain’t no bad guy…