Tag: Pau Gasol

Kevin Garnett

Phil Jackson says Lakers and Timberwolves had “handshake agreement” on Kevin Garnett trade in 2007


When the Timberwolves traded Kevin Garnett to the Celtics in 2007, it changed the balance of power in the Eastern Conference. The Celtics won the 2008 title immediately after acquiring Garnett and Ray Allen, and made the Finals again two years later. The Big Three of Garnett, Allen and Paul Pierce was the NBA’s defining superteam until LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh teamed up in Miami in 2010.

But Garnett was almost a Laker. According to Phil Jackson in a new oral history of Garnett’s career by Bleacher Report’s Howard Beck (which is worth reading in its entirety), the Lakers had a deal lined up for Garnett centered around Lamar Odom and Andrew Bynum, before Minnesota ultimately went with Boston’s package.

Here’s the account of the almost-trade from Jackson, Timberwolves owner Glen Taylor, and Garnett’s agent, Andy Miller:

The Lakers offered a package built around multi-skilled forward Lamar Odom and 19-year-old center Andrew Bynum, a promising second-year player who would eventually become an All-Star. Odom had a history of flaky behavior, however, and Bynum was unproven.

The Celtics’ package was built around another talented, but still-developing young center, Al Jefferson, along with several other young players and draft picks.

Phil Jackson: Dr. [Jerry] Buss came to me and said, “I have a handshake agreement with Taylor, that he’s going to come to L.A. But McHale hasn’t concurred yet.” So I said, “Well that’s a good excuse.” You always, as an owner, say, “I’ll do this, but …” So I kept that hope out there, that he was gonna be a part of the Laker organization.

Glen Taylor: Odom, I was a little afraid of. I thought Bynum was gonna be a star.

Andy Miller: I think that what McHale was looking for, on top of picks, was a core young piece, and he was infatuated with Al Jefferson at the time.

Glen Taylor: It became the Lakers, and it became Boston. And they both said, what does [Garnett] want to get paid? And I told them what he wants to get paid. I told them the kind of contract. And those two teams said they would do it.

The package from the Celtics that ended up netting Garnett involved Al Jefferson, Gerald Green, Ryan Gomes, Theo Ratliff, Sebastian Telfair and a future first-round pick. The Lakers’ package of Odom and Bynum probably had more short-term upside — Odom won Sixth Man of the Year in 2011 and Bynum was an All-Star the following year. But both have since flamed out of the league.

More than anything, this is a fascinating what-if, because Garnett going to the Lakers changes a lot of things. If the Celtics’ Big Three never happens, maybe the Cavs or Magic get another couple of Finals appearances. The Lakers wouldn’t have traded for Pau Gasol if they’d had Garnett, either, which means the Grizzlies wouldn’t have wound up with his brother Marc, and that franchise’s fortunes could have been vastly different. This just goes to show how one domino can have a lasting effect on the entire league.

Rumor: Derrick Rose’s frustration with Jimmy Butler caused him to play passively in Game 6

Milwaukee Bucks v Chicago Bulls - Game Five

In the first quarter of a must-win Game 6 for the Bulls last week, Derrick Rose came out attacking and had 10 points on 5-of-9 shooting, and the Bulls were in it down by two. After the first quarter, Rose had 4 points on 2-of-7 shooting, with three assists and he was -18.

What changed? The Cavaliers defense? Just the ebbs and flows of a tough series?

Or, was Rose acting out passive-aggressively because Jimmy Buttler was demanding he rock? That’s what is being reported by Dan Bernstein of CBS Chicago.

Rose was never asked directly why he disappeared when his team needed him most, but sources tell 670 The Score that a common NBA problem affected the Bulls at the worst possible time – two alpha dogs and only one basketball.

It looked strange when wing Jimmy Butler kept flashing to Rose’s side of the floor, calling for the ball, as the Bulls’ offense was drying up. Rose was all too happy to oblige instead of waving Butler off and taking charge, either resetting the called play or taking his man – often the undrafted Matthew Dellavedova – hard to the rim for at least a likely foul.

Sources describe a passive-aggressive reaction from Rose that was the culmination of tensions building in recent weeks with Butler’s emergence as a primary scorer.

I’m taking this report with a lot of salt — I don’t buy it.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m willing to bet someone with an agenda was selling this spin to reporters, just not sure I believe it. Or at least believe that it was that big an impact.

First, the emergence of Butler is something that had been going on all season, not just during this series. Why did Rose decide to act out at the team’s most critical juncture of the season? Just to make a point at the worst time?

Second, this doesn’t fit with the personality of Rose — the man is a competitor. He fought and pushed too hard and too long to get back on the court to throw a series away because he was suddenly jealous.

Finally, Rose was inconsistent all series and all season. Butler was growing in confidence and aggressiveness all series and all season. Not sure this all doesn’t fit into that pattern.

What is clear is that whoever is the next coach of the Bulls — Fred Hoiberg or Alvin Gentry or even still Tom Thibodeau — they have to find a better way to fit the pieces together in this offense. Not just Rose and Butler, but also Pau Gasol, Joakim Noah, Nikola Mirotic, Doug McDermott and the rest. The Bulls were too conventional and too defendable, which was less about Butler or Rose and more about the system that made things easier for Cleveland.

Report: Kristaps Porzingis ‘a serious threat’ to be selected with one of NBA Draft’s top three picks

Kristaps Porzingis

The top four slots in the most widely-respected mock drafts have been set for some time now, with some combination of Karl-Anthony Towns, Jahlil Okafor, D’Angelo Russell and Emmanuel Mudiay being firmly in place.

But as we get closer to the June 25 event, and as teams begin to more closely evaluate the talent available , another name is threatening to emerge as one of the top selections.

From Scott Howard-Cooper of NBA.com:

Kristaps Porzingis, a smooth-shooting power forward from Latvia, has emerged as a serious threat to break into the top three of the June 25 draft in a potential serious shakeup to the long-held perception the top four spots are set, with some executives at the pre-draft combine here saying Porzingis could go second.

“He could go two,” one general manager said. “He’s that good. Nobody says anything bad about him.”

Said the head of basketball operations for another team: “I think he’s a lock for the top five and I wouldn’t be surprised to see him go as high as top three. He’s good. We all like to do our comparables. He’s like Dirk Nowitzki or Pau Gasol….. I’d take him ahead of (Jahlil) Okafor.”

Porzingis is 7’1″, and averaged 10.7 points, 4.4 rebounds and 1.1 blocked shots in international play this past season, while knocking down 37.9 percent of his shots from three-point distance.

The draft isn’t always about taking the best player available; teams often go with needs even if a more talented prospect is attainable at the time.

Once Tuesday’s Draft Lottery is completed, and we know for sure exactly who is picking where, things will begin to come into focus as far as the top of the draft board is concerned. But it’s clear that despite what’s been projected to this point, nothing can be counted on until Adam Silver officially reveals each team’s pick once draft night is upon us.