Tag: Orlando Magic

Brooklyn Nets v Orlando Magic

Magic GM says he intends to re-sign restricted free agent Tobias Harris ‘no mater what’


Tobias Harris is a nice player, averaging 17 points and 6.3 rebounds in 34.8 minutes per game for the Magic this season, while shooting 36.1 percent from three-point distance.

But is he a max player?

Harris will be a restricted free agent this summer, and if Magic GM Rob Hennigan is to be believed, the team is prepared to match any offer Harris receives — no matter how steep the price.

From Brian Schmitz of the Orlando Sentinel:

Magic GM Rob Hennigan says the club “intends” to bring back F Tobias Harris – a restricted free agent – “no matter what” the cost this summer. At $15 mill per year? Seeing is believing.

This is fairly earth-shaking news. Hennigan wouldn’t pay Harris what he wanted – near max money – when they talked contract before the season.

Now Hennigan is telling the league he’ll essentially match any offer. He could make Harris the team’s highest-paid player, exceeding Nik Vucevic’s $13-million per year. He must have a hunch that the market for Harris won’t be outrageous.

The funny part is that Hennigan – who guards information like launch codes and rarely speaks to us media scoundrels – talked about Harris on a conference call to season-ticket holders.

It’s possible that Hennigan means what he says, especially when considering the fact that max contracts handed out this summer — before the salary cap spikes nearly $30 million in advance of the 2016-17 season — could end up seeming like bargains in the very near future.

But what’s more likely is that Hennigan is doing what every GM does with regard to their team’s restricted free agents.

The plan is to lead everyone to believe that a team will simply match any offer the player receives, in order to discourage teams from tying up available cap space by signing a player to an offer sheet during the early days of the free agent frenzy.

We saw this play out with both Eric Bledsoe and Greg Monroe last summer, when neither player could get signed to a max-level offer sheet that would force their current teams to match.

The Magic had the chance to offer Harris piles of money on a contract extension before the season began, but ultimately passed; we’ll see if anything changes this summer.

76ers and Jazz are ridiculously young – and that works for them

Philadelphia 76ers V Utah Jazz

BOSTON – Jason Richardson knows plenty about losing.

He has spent 11 seasons in his 14-year career with losing teams. He has seen how losing tears teams apart, how it instills bad habits, how it fosters poor attitudes. He has played for multiple teams that were checked out mentally by this point in the season.

But he has never played for a team quite like these 76ers, who, by their 18-61 record, appear to resemble Richardson’s prior poor squads.

“Being on this team, guys not thinking they’re losers,” Richardson said. “And that’s a great sign.

“A lot of them haven’t gotten opportunity in the past. A lot of these guys have been in the D-League. A lot of guys just coming into the league. So, they try to take advantage of that. So, that’s what you want to see from young guys.”

Emphasis on young.

The 76ers, with an average age – weighted for playing time and set to each player’s age on Feb. 1 of a given season – of 23.2 are historically young. So are the Jazz, who have an average age of 23.4.

These teams are not just randomly stacked with young players. Their youth is fundamental to their identities.

Philadelphia is a full year younger on average than the NBA’s third-youngest team this season (Magic), and Utah also nearly clears that bar:


Historically, the 76ers rate as the fourth-youngest team-ever, and the Jazz are sixth.

Both teams have seen average age fluctuate as their rosters have churned, and here’s how the age of Philadelphia (red) and Utah (gold) has progressed through the season compared to the NBA’s previous youngest teams:


With roster compositions so different from the rest of the league, the 76ers and Jazz have their own styles.

“I won’t say it’s collegiate, but it’s…” Utah coach Quin Snyder, who previously coached Missouri, said, trailing off. Philadelphia coach Brett Brown describes the 76ers as a “program,” the college version of the NBA “franchise.”

If it’s not quite collegiate, it’s as close as the NBA gets.

The 76ers were nearly as young last season, when they finished with, to the point, the seventh-youngest average age in league history. Brown emphasized player development, and the Jazz are following suit – in ways older teams won’t.

Utah practices more often with contact and more frequently holds shootarounds.

“We try to squeeze every little bit out of every minute – whether it’s practice, shootaround, games, film,” Snyder said. “And that’s important, I think, for a group that doesn’t have experience. We’re going to try to gain it any way we can.”

Snyder and Brown both say they have stressed basic lessons, often repeating their message.

“If you haven’t done something a thousand times, you’ve done it 10 times, you need to keep doing it,” Snyder said. “So, the formation of habits, there’s a redundancy there that, for a player, can get old. And for our guys, it’s really a different type of mental toughness, to be able to come to work every day and grind and grind and grind. I always admired swimmers. To be able to to get in the pool and swim, that’s hard. We’ve asked our team to, some of the most mundane things that you associate with basketball, to commit to them and to commit to them with a level of precision. We’re not going to get better if we don’t do it right.”

And the Jazz have gotten better.

They’re 17-8 since the All-Star break, playing lights-out defense. Players are improving, perhaps nobody more so than Rudy Gobert.

The 76ers have their own success stories – including Nerlens Noel breaking out and Jerami Grant steadily improving – in this environment.

To whatever degree these teams got young because youth usually means losing, and losing means a better draft pick, they’re also committed to developing their players.

And it’s not as if these teams have gotten freakishly young on the individual level.

Aside from 19-year-old Dante Exum – the NBA’s fifth-youngest player behind Bruno Caboclo, Aaron Gordon, Noah Vonleh and James Young – there isn’t a teenager in the bunch.

Philadelphia’s youngest player, the 20-year-old Noel, isn’t even in his first year in the league.

But to balance this on the other end, the Jazz have nobody over 27.

Do they know which player is the oldest on Utah’s roster?

“Joe Ingles,” Elijah Millsap said.

“We’re tied,” Ingles said. “We’re kind of tied.”

“I’ll take Joe Ingles,” Millsap said. “He looks older.”

“My body is older,” Ingles admits with a twinge of pride.

“I do know that I’m the oldest,” Millsap finally conceded.

Millsap is correct. He’s a month and change older than than Ingles.

Having this discussion? Two rookies.

Unsurprisingly, Millsap is younger than any oldest player on a team in the NBA this season:


“We really don’t have a veteran on this team,” Millsap said. “I wouldn’t say a veteran, veteran – a super veteran.

“I think it’s better this way. Guys have to learn on their own, bump their head and, in the process, just continue to get better.”

Gordon Hayward and Derrick Favors, both in their fifth seasons, are Utah’s most-experienced players. Trevor Booker and Jeremy Evans are also in their fifth years, but neither has played nearly as much.

Hayward says he and Favors embrace leadership roles despite being so young, but, he adds, “It’s definitely a weird situation.”

That strangeness can turn out well for involved, though.

“It’s kind of a blessing to be able to be kind of thrown into the fire,” said Hornets forward Marvin Williams, who was a rookie on the 2005-06 Hawks – the youngest team of all time. “You have to take your lumps when you’re learning on the fly like that.”

Williams looked up to veterans Tony Delk and Tyronn Lue on that team, but in many ways, he was on his own in a mostly young locker room. Playing back-to-backs for the first time, Williams wasn’t ready for the grind.

“I would take losses so hard,” Williams said. “When I would go home, my buddies would always tell me I was in such a bad mood all the time. I wouldn’t want to do anything. Sometimes, I wouldn’t sleep.”

There are advantages to having such young teams, though, especially when trying to develop chemistry.

“We have a lot of similar interests in just everyday things, from to music to the usual activities,” Noel said. “Everybody gets along so well. Everybody was in college so recently, so I think we’ve done a great job bonding and staying close-knit.”

But that process hasn’t come as easily for everyone in Philadelphia.

“It challenges you,” said Luc Mbah a Moute, the 76ers other established veteran, a 28-year-old and seven-year pro.

Which aspect is most challenging?

“Everything, pretty much,” Mbah a Moute said. “Just the grind of having to be patient and having to wait and see how those guys learn. They pretty much have to learn through mistakes.”

Though Mbah Moute said he enjoys seeing that process unfold, there are difficulties for him, especially when it comes to relating to his younger teammates.

“Definitely different. Definitely too young for me,” Mbah a Moute said. “But I’m not that old, so we still spend time, enjoy ourselves. Obviously, I’m not as wild as they are.”

Mbah a Moute certainly doesn’t seem to be working against the stream, but Richardson – Philadelphia’s oldest player, who received adult diapers from his teammates when he turned 34 earlier this year – sounds fully on board with the 76ers’ youth.

“They gave me inspiration, just the way the come in and work hard and love the game. They’re happy that they’re here, but they’re working still at the same time,” Richardson said. “I can remember that feeling as a young guy.”

Five Things We Learned in NBA Wednesday: Derrick Rose is back but Bulls are not

Derrick Rose, Elfrid Payton, Tobias Harris, Dewayne Dedmon

If you watch closely every night in the NBA you can learn a little something. We know you are busy and can’t keep up with every game, so we’re here to help with those lessons from another night in the Association. Here’s what you missed while casting your ballot for a dead man

1) Derrick Rose is back, but Bulls lose ugly while Toronto passes them in standings. Derrick Rose is back. That should have been good news for Chicago — Paul George returned to Indiana and you saw every other Pacer player pick up their game in respose. The Bulls with Rose? Not even close. First off, Rose was settling for jumpers and ended up scoring 9 points on 9 shots, going 1-of-6 from three. But nobody else picked up their game for the Bulls — Joakim Noah and Pau Gasol got outplayed by Nikola Vucevic, who had 22 points and 7 boards. Nikola Mirotic was 3-of-11. The Bulls led by 15 in the second quarter but their defense still isn’t Thibodeauesque and they just can’t hold those leads. Chicago’s habit of playing to the level of their competition caught up with them again, capped off by Victor Oladipo hitting the game winner.

Meanwhile, Toronto trounced fading Charlotte, and with that the Raptors and Bulls are tied for the 3/4 seeds in the East — with Toronto having the tie breaker. Toronto does not have an easy schedule in its final four (three on the road), and the Bulls got Rose back, but unless that translates into better play the Bulls may fall into a tougher first round matchup.

2) Cleveland is locked in to the two seed in the East. Milwaukee was hanging with Cleveland on Wednesday night; they are not a team that rolls over and were within two (99-97) with :30 seconds left. Then LeBron stuck the dagger in the Bucks, hitting a contested three over Jared Dudley. Ballgame. With that, the Cavs locked up the two seed. Cleveland has 50 wins, enough to have them home against everyone in the East save Atlanta. However, they are not going to have home court in the Finals against anybody in the West, unless the Pelicans surprise us all.

3) New Orleans falls flat in Memphis, now tied with Oklahoma City for final playoff spot in West. Tuesday night the Pelicans had us believing — they beat Golden State and jumped up to the eight seed in the West. But a back-to-back against the stingy defense of Memphis brought the Pelicans crashing back to reality — the Pelicans shot 28-of-80 as a team (35 percent) and that ended about as well as you’d expect. With the loss, the Pelicans are tied with the Thunder for the last playoff spot in the West. New Orleans has the tie breaker but OKC has one team over .500 left on their roster, New Orleans has two. This could go down to the final day.

4) Brooklyn stumbles, Boston wins and the race for eight out East gets even tighter. Brook Lopez keeps putting up numbers — 26 points, 10 rebounds, three blocks — but they couldn’t get stops against the Hawks. Joe Johnson missed a three and a chance to force OT, so the Nets fell to the Hawks 114-111. Meanwhile, Boston got 34 points from Isaiah Thomas and picked up a key win. So here is where we stand as of today: Boston and Brooklyn are tied for the 7/8 seeds at 36-42, with both Miami and Indiana one game behind them. This remains one of the best races to watch the final week of the season (along with 2-6 in the West and the Pelicans/Thunder).

5) The Spurs just keep on rolling right into the playoffs. San Antonio would like to say all your playoff seeding and efforts are moot — they have won nine in a row, all by at least 12 points. Since the end of the rodeo road trip, they are 17-3 (and two of those losses were in OT). Kawhi Leonard is playing like a Top 10 guy. Tony Parker is getting in the lane. They rolled James Harden and Houston on Wednesday. The defending champs are back, and Gregg Popovich is having fun on the sidelines.

Victor Oladipo’s game-winner spoils Derrick Rose’s return (video)

Chicago Bulls v Orlando Magic

Derrick Rose had a rocky return, scoring nine points on 3-of-9 shooting with two assists and four turnovers in 19 minutes.

That opened the door for Victor Oladipo and the lowly Magic to steal a win from the Bulls.

Chicago’s defense just isn’t what it used to be, though there’s hope it’ll return to form as everyone gets healthy. That will clearly take time, though Oladipo deserves more credit than the Bulls deserve blame for this play.

On the bright side, despite Joakim Noah’s wishes, Chicago is now fourth in the Eastern Conference – which could create an easier playoff road. Would you rather face the Wizards in the first round and the Hawks if you win or the Bucks in the first round and the Cavaliers if you win?

Elfrid Payton hammers one-handed putback dunk on Taj Gibson (video)

Chicago Bulls v Orlando Magic

Elfrid Payton has been one of the few success stories from the first round of the 2014 NBA draft, and that’s despite his horrid jumper.

Who needs shooting when you can do this, though?

If you’re a Comcast subscriber in Chicago, you can stream tonight’s Bulls-Magic game here.