Tag: one and done

Michigan v Duke

Coach K complains about one-and-done rule. Shocking.


Know this about Mike Krzyzewski — he likes to be in control of things. He may not be obsessive and overbearing about it like some coaches, but he likes things done his way.

And when it comes to college basketball and the one-and-done rule, he has no control. Nobody does. John Calipari may have figured out how to best use the system, but even he says he doesn’t like it.

Coach K was on The Sports Animal in Oklahoma City and had this to say about the state of the game (via Sports Radio Interviews).

“First of all college basketball doesn’t control college basketball. The NBA controls college basketball. They are the ones along with the players union that sets the rule. College basketball just reacts to what the NBA does to include the early entry date. College basketball put out April 10th. Well that date doesn’t mean anything. April 29th is when guys have a chance to put their names in the NBA draft. I think one of the main things that has to happen is college basketball has to have a relationship with the NBA. There should be someone in charge of college basketball who on a day-to-day basis sets an agenda for our great sport. We don’t have anything like that. As a resolve we don’t have a voice with the NBA or the players union and that’s just kind of sad.”

For the record, he’s not wrong here. College presidents and colleges would come down on the same side here as the NBA owners — they all want to extend this to two or three and done. That’s good for the coaches, good for the universities’ pocketbooks, good for the NBA owners and teams that get longer to scout and evaluate young players.

But for me, it comes back to this — if you are good enough to be in the NBA at age 18, why shouldn’t you be allowed to? Because NBA owners and their scouts sometimes make bad choices on high school players? Because other kids get bad advice and come out when they shouldn’t? So the truly talented and ready should be punished because other people screwed up? Nice system there.

Nobody likes one-and-done. I still like the college baseball system (you can be drafted out of high school — and I think you shouldn’t lose your elegibility if you work out for teams and test the waters — but if you go to college you are there three years). But that is not perfect and the NBA owners don’t like it.

The age limit got pushed aside during the NBA’s lockout, a committee is supposed to take it up later. But in the end they will probably just leave it at one year as the compromise nobody likes.

Especially Coach K.

Talking one-and-done with guys who did it

Rose Calipari Memphis
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Part of the NBA labor talks — the part they are going to get to after they figure out the money and system stuff that have taken 133 days and are still not solved — is discussing the NBA’s age limit.

The players are not huge fans. The owners are very committed and many would rather see it at two years before you can come to the NBA, not just one. More time in college means teams get a better idea who they are drafting (fewer mistakes, they’d like to think) and they like the process of colleges generating stars that people will then try to follow in the NBA.

But what do the guys that did it think about it?

ESPN the Magazine did a great article talking to all the one-and-done guys from the last few years to get their thoughts. Go read the whole thing. But here are a few highlights.

Derrick Rose (Bulls, Memphis): “The biggest adjustment was to the NBA lifestyle — paying bills, taking care of my family, the women coming at you. I’m just being honest. I was 19. I’m glad I had BJ [Armstrong] to prepare me for all that. On the court it was knowing all the play calls, knowing how to talk to your teammates, learning to play through your mistakes. I was lucky — I was allowed to do that. Other people who came out with me didn’t have the same opportunity and it took them a lot longer to get comfortable.”

DeAndre Jordan (Clippers, Texas A&M): “When I first got my apartment I was 19 and I just sat in there alone and was like ‘Who am I gonna hang out with?’ In college, the guys you hang out with are your age and they don’t really have anything to do after practice besides homework and just stay at the apartment, so I had to get used to staying at home by myself and picking up new hobbies. In the NBA, once practice is over everyone goes their separate ways because some people have families, some people have other issues going on, wives, girlfriends and things like that so you can’t hang out with them as much as you hang with your college buddies.”

B.J. Mullins (Thunder, Ohio State): Myself, growing up in homeless shelters and 15 different houses, 15 elementary/middle schools, if I see a kid that has a talent like that, I’ll tell him to go. If I see a rich, suburb kid, why does he have to go straight to the NBA if he already has money? Get your education, enjoy life.”

Kevin Love (Timberwolves, UCLA): “Like with all aspects of life, something that potential one-and-done players should definitely look out for is people in your life that are Yes Men. Ask yourself, who are the people that are challenging you? Who’s giving you a different perspective? Who is challenging you and making you think about the things that you do? Listen to those people. It makes you look at things differently. That’s only going to help your decision-making.”

DeMarcus Cousins (Kings, Kentucky): In a way, it’s good because a kid needs that college experience — to go through those changes and being closer to being an adult and learn that responsibility at the college level. At the same time, I don’t believe the rule should be put in place because it’s predicting somebody else’s life — you should be able to make your own path because you never know what that person’s situation may be at home or with their family.

Report: NBA owners want to make it two-and-done in college

NCAA Men's Championship Game - Butler v UConn


While the age limit should be a side issue to the upcoming NBA Collective Bargaining Agreement — percentage of basketball related income is the real number to watch — it looks like it could be another little battleground.

Billy Hunter from the players union said that he didn’t think it was appropriate to keep an 18-year-old from being able to seek gainful employment. He wants one-and-done to be done.

Some owners want to make it two years, reports Marc Spears at Yahoo.

Several high-ranking NBA team executives told Yahoo! Sports they wouldn’t be surprised if the age limit in the new CBA is pushed to two years in college and 20 years old by the end of that calendar year. One NBA general manager says about two-thirds of teams are in favor of that change. The current CBA states that an American must be out of high school for at least one year and be 19 years old by the end of that calendar year before entering the draft.

The owners will sell this about how it is good for the college game, good for the NBA to have more established names and stars in the draft, how one-and-done didn’t work as they hoped. College basketball people will understandably think this is a good idea for their sport.

But it’s not about the sport — it’s about money. And the owners saving themselves from themselves.

The last NBA draft where high schoolers were allowed in, the Trail Blazers used the No. 6 pick on Martell Webster. Then they had to spend a couple years really developing him and it was his third season before he was really contributing as a starter and putting in 10 points a game. The Lakers took Andrew Bynum No. 10 and it was sort of the same thing. The Celtics took Gerald Green No. 18 in that draft and he is out of the league.

Drafting high school players is hard and expensive. First you have to pay scouts to get film and fly wherever to get a look at this kid. You’ve got to work them out. Then you’ve got to try and project how the kid is going to be in a couple years. It’s a more expensive effort than drafting college kids, and there is more risk on how they will pan out. If you think the risk is worth it and you draft a high schooler you’ve got to pay him millions while you develop his skills.

What the owners want is somebody else to develop this talent for them for free. And after a couple years of college you have an older-mature player and you have a better idea of how good, or not good, they are going to be. You make fewer mistakes.

So the owners win, college basketball wins — and the elite players get screwed.

No doubt, there is a real value in a college education and the college experience. But there is no reason to hold the Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, Dwight Howard, Kevin Garnett, Amar’e Stoudemire type players out of the league. If you’re good enough to go, you should be eligible for the draft. You should get paid. Some are mature enough to handle it. If Doc Rivers’ son Austin is good enough to go pro, he should have that option.

If you want to set up a baseball like system, where kids can go pro or they can go to college — but if you go to college you are there three years. That’s fine. But the age limit is arbitrary and about protecting owners and GMs at the expense of the young players. Players don’t really like it. The players union is giving that good lip service right now, but will they really fight for it or when push comes to shove would they be willing to trade the rights of future but not current union member get the current union members something they want?

Either you can play in the NBA or you can’t, but if you’re good enough you should be allowed on the court regardless of age. However, like the rest of this CBA, it is really about the owners setting up rules to protect themselves from themselves. And to make sure they save a few bucks in the process.