Tag: Oklahoma City Miami Game 1

Miami Heat v Oklahoma City Thunder - Game One

Video: Relive the NBA Finals Game 1 win for Thunder

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Enough about Game 1, it’s almost time to turn our attention to Game 2 of the NBA finals.

But before we do, here is a great video from NBA.com looking back at the first game, with some cool footage and interviews. This is a good way to start out your Thursday morning. Then we can get on with the business of whether or not the Heat can make this a series.

Bosh apparently wants to be booed, calls Thunder crowd, noise “regular”

Chris Bosh

Chris Bosh wants to make sure LeBron James doesn’t get all the hate from the Thunder fans — he wants his share, too. He should get it now.

The Chesapeake Energy Arena was rocking Tuesday night with blue-shirt clad Oklahomans who treat a Thunder game like a college football game — it is loud and raucous. The loudest arena in the NBA.

Unless you ask Bosh. Here’s his quote, via Eye on Basketball.

“Everybody keeps talking about how loud it is,” Bosh said. “It’s regular. We’ve been in a lot of other arenas and it’s about the same. Once it gets really loud, it’s all about the same.”

It’s not regular in there. It’s deafening. It’s part of what inspired the Thunder’s come-from-behind win.

Some guys play better when the crowd is against them, when the boos rain down on them. Not sure if Chris Bosh is one of those guys, but we’ll find out Thursday.

Durant admits he, Thunder were nervous before Game 1

Russell Westbrook, Kevin Durant

Kevin Durant started out shooting 1-of-5. Russell Westbrook seemed to be trying to do too much. The Thunder were hanging around but no looking like the team that in the past couple weeks had easily knocked off the Spurs and Lakers.

What happened?

They were nervous. Kevin Durant owned up to it his postgame press conference.

“Like (Westbrook) said, it kind of took us a couple minutes to get the nervousness out of us and the jitters out of it. We’ve just got to play our game….

“You know, just being in The Finals, we kind of was nervous, I guess. That’s something we can’t — it can’t happen next game or the rest of the series. Just got to come out with a lot of energy, and hopefully we do it next game.”

He’s right, the Heat will come out harder and faster next game and the Thunder have to match that. But the nerves should be behind them. Hopefully for Thunder fans.

Heat-Thunder Game 1: Miami didn’t choke; worse they were themselves

Miami Heat v Oklahoma City Thunder - Game One

The easy mantra out of Game 1 of the NBA finals is that the Heat choked. LeBron choked in the fourth quarter. Again.

But that’s not what happened. The reality is scarier for Heat fans.

Miami was exactly who they are. Who they have been all season, all playoffs. And unless they can find a way to grow and evolve past it this season will end just like the last one.

From Christmas Day until Tuesday night the pattern had always been the same for Miami — they didn’t need to bring it for four quarters to win. They were always the most athletic team. The faster team. The team that could overwhelm you with effort on defense and turn that into fast break points. And they’d do all that in spurts of great defense and ball movement and transition offense. Then they’d revert to stretches of stagnant ball and good defense. And that was enough to win.

That’s not good enough anymore.

Oklahoma City is up 1-0 in the NBA finals because they were the more athletic team, the faster team. The team that overwhelmed with defense and turned that into fast break points in the second half while Miami went into it’s shell. OKC won 105-94.

OKC can match Miami athletically and they execute for Scott Brooks for 48 minutes in a way the Heat simply do not for Erik Spoelstra. As they did against the Spurs, the Thunder showed an ability to elevate their game to the moment, to adjust and attack. Can Miami match that?

Miami is nowhere near out of this series — more teams than you can count lost Game 1 of the NBA finals and came back to win it all. Including Dallas last year.

But to that Miami has big questions to answer — how do they get Dwyane Wade attacking in the paint not settling for jumpers? (I’m still not convinced his knee is bothering him more than he is letting on.) How do they get LeBron James some rest so he is fresher and more aggressive late? How can they get Chris Bosh going? Is it time to take LeBron off Kendrick Perkins at times and just sick him on Durant the whole game? How can they improve their transition defense so the Thunder don’t run them out of the building on Thursday?

The Heat looked slow in the second half Tuesday — they looked like a team on a regular season-back-to-back, fading as the game went on. They settled for jumpers and as a team were 2-8 shooting outside 10 feet in the fourth.

Part of it are Xs and Os adjustments — Miami had great success trapping off the pick and roll in the first 20 minutes, and when the Thunder had a little success breaking it the Heat went switching the picks. OKC ate that up. The Thunder ended with 56 points in the paint. LeBron was on Kendrick Perkins so he could be on Durant to trap off the pick, to switch onto KD. Not that it mattered to Durant in the second half who was defending him.

Miami’s defense, by design wants to push you into isolation plays. A good strategy against 28 other NBA teams, but Oklahoma City thrives with Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and James Harden in isolation. The Heat need better team defense.

“When we’re not defending we don’t get opportunities in the open court,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. “Then when we don’t attack we don’t get as many opportunities in the paint or at the free throw line.”

The other way to slow down the Thunder attack is to make them take the ball out of the basket.

LeBron James simply can’t be good — ne must be exceptional. Tuesday night he was simply good, scoring 30 points, He was 2-of-6 for 7 points in the fourth. That’s not enough. Wade doesn’t look right and Bosh is coming off his injury, LeBron has to do more. Which is hard when Thabo Sefolosha is crowding you. But it’s the reality of where the Heat are — LeBron has to be a monster. Game 6 vs. Boston monster.

Shane Battier needs to hit shots again. Mario Chalmers needs to hit shots again, and other guys need to step at both ends. For 48 minutes.

But the Heat really haven’t done that all season or playoffs long. Can they change now?

Heat-Thunder Game 1: Who has been here before? Poised OKC pulls away for win.

Miami Heat v Oklahoma City Thunder - Game One

Miami is the team in its second consecutive trip to the NBA finals, the team that talked about its new attitude, how it learned from last season, about LeBron James’ new glare, and was more comfortable on the stage.

But like they did throughout the Eastern Conference playoffs — and like they did last finals — the Heat took plays off, quarters off in Game 1. And that costs them. The Thunder are just too good to coast against.

Miami had a 13-point first quarter lead and watched it evaporate under some pressure from the Thunder in the second half. OKC played better defense and the Heat became jump shooters, shots they missed. Meanwhile Kevin Durant was knocking down his jumpers on his way to scoring 23 of 36 in second half, as the Thunder scored on 21 of the last 29 possessions.

The result was a poised Thunder team pulling away from the Heat, winning 105-94 to take a 1-0 series lead in the NBA finals. Game 2 is Thursday night.

One game does not a series make — the NBA finals have a long history of teams losing the first game and coming back to win the series. Including Dallas last year.

But this game looked like the Heat have played all playoffs long. So far that has been good enough. It will not be anymore.

In the first half Miami got great performances from its role players — Shane Battier had 13, Mario Chalmers had 10 and the Heat were 6-10 from three from three. LeBron James had 14 but a quiet 14. Dwyane Wade was making good decisions.

Yet at the half, the Heat were only up 7, 54-47. You knew a Thunder run was coming. If you watched the Heat all season you knew a slump was very possible.

And you didn’t have to wait long. The Thunder came out with a lot more defensive intensity in the third quarter, they went on a 9-3 run and the game was tied. Miami shot just 33 percent for the quarter.

And that let the Thunder get out and run — they won the fast break points this game 24-4. Running is supposed to be the Heat’s thing, but they ran into a team as athletic as they are.

“They pounded us on the break and that led to everything else,” Chris Bosh said. “We’re going to have to figure out how to stop this team’s fast break because that really gets them going, especially here on their home court.”

One way to do that is to make shots — the Heat didn’t in the second half. They started to settle for jump shots. Credit the Thunder and particularly Thabo Sefolosha for that — he shut Wade off (7-of-19 shooting) and spent key stretches on LeBron (11-of-24 shooting).

Meanwhile, Durant and Russell Westbrook owned the show. Westbrook had 12 of his 27 in the third, Durant had 17 of his 36 in the fourth. The Heat defense wants to take away your passing lanes and force you into isolation basketball, it’s their design. But it doesn’t really work against the Thunder because Westbrook and Durant thrive in that setting.

“We’re a better defensive team than we showed tonight,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said after the game. They need to prove it.

Each quarter the Thunder seemed to get more comfortable on the stage and with the matchups. The Heat did their coasting thing again.

If that doesn’t change, three out of the next five games in this series will look a lot like this one.