Tag: NFL


NFL defensive lineman “Spice” Adams puts out his hoop mix-tape


If you’re an NBA team looking at the big men remaining on the market, you can’t feel all that good. So NFL free agent defensive lineman Anthony “Spice” Adams has put together a tape for all of you to watch and see if your team might need a big man. I mean, basketball is his first love.

He’s ready to prove you wrong when you say that 6’0″, 310 pounds is not the ideal size for an NBA player.

This tape made me laugh so I had to post it. Hat tip to the All Ball blog at NBA.com.

Warren Sapp says “pretty boy” LeBron not built for NFL


Could LeBron James make it in the NFL?

It’s a moot question, but thanks to this interminable lockout we have time to dwell on moot questions. Pete Carroll told him to come try out and James did practice with a high school team.

LeBron is certainly athletic enough to be a tight end in the NFL — have the quarterback throw high at the back of the end zone and LeBron will get balls nobody else will. But, could he handle the contact? Could he get that tall frame down low and create leverage to block?

Warren Sapp doesn’t think so. As part of the NFL Network’s “No Huddle” show Sapp fell back on the Jordan rip on LeBron, reports the USA Today (via SLAM).

“How about LeBron do one-sixth of what (Michael) Jordan did, let’s see him go win a championship,” Sapp said. “Go do that. Go see if you can conquer your sport before you come over here because them boys on defense, we like pretty boys like that. We want to split them.”

Jalen Rose gave a better football analysis but basically agrees — James wouldn’t want the contact.

“The one thing about football — you can go up for the football — I don’t think his feet’ll hit the ground on the way down because they will take him out. I think that game is too physical, I think it’s too demanding, I think that it’s hard to block defensive ends — it’s more to that job of being a tight end than just running routes.”

Former Saints coach Jim Mora points out one reason defensive backs would like to play against LeBron — fewer fines.

“I know one thing, it’d be hard to get a hit to the head on him.”

How does the NBA stack up to the NFL, MLB, and NHL in spending efficiency?

NBA Finals Mavericks Heat Basketball

Periodically, one financially inclined publication or another takes a look at the performance of professional sports teams in relation to their payroll. What typically ensues is just basic division; the outlets divide the total salary cost by the team’s wins, and then rank the teams according to their total cost per win. It’s a fun exercise, but Ira Boudway of Businessweek took things a step further. After calculating that “cost per win” number for each team across all four major sports over the last five years, Boudway found the standard deviation for each team within their respective sports. Using that standard deviation — dubbed “Efficiency Index” for the purposes of that particular post — Boudway was able to compare across leagues, and determine the spenders who are getting the greatest payoff per dollar spent relative to their competition.

NBA clubs don’t rank too well overall; the Spurs (5th) are the only basketball franchise in the top 10 according to the aforementioned Efficiency Index, and the Jazz (14th) and Lakers (15th) just barely managed to squeeze into the top 15. There are a run of NBA clubs in the low-20s, but overall, pro basketball doesn’t quite seem able to keep up with the MLB or NHL in term of win efficiency in financial terms.

That said, there’s an interesting trend at the top of these rankings: the “smartest-spending” NBA, NFL, and NHL teams are rewarded for their spending efficiency with playoff berths and championships, while MLB teams often fail to compete despite showing well in terms of their cost per win. Only two of the seven baseball teams in the Index’s top 30 have participated in postseason play over the last five years. Three of those inept teams (Florida Marlins, Pittsburgh Pirates, San Diego Padres) have fallen short of the playoffs five straight times despite ranking in the Efficiency Index’s top 10. True to form, this kind of data speaks to the return on high-level spending in baseball, which is by nature inefficient.

However, even when we look at NBA teams within the context of cross-league comparison, it’s hard to draw any concrete conclusions. This kind of reframing is interesting on a self-contained level, but it doesn’t do too much to clarify the existing, oft-debated dynamic between big spending and big wins in professional basketball. We know that exorbitant spending in the NBA isn’t always efficient, but it clearly can be; teams like the Lakers, Mavericks, and Magic have benefited greatly from their ability to give and take on large contracts. However, a line can — and should — be drawn between teams that spend and teams who are willing to spend. The chicken-egg element of these discussions lies in the fact that some owners are willing to spend if they have the right talent base to justify such expenditures, but simply don’t believe their middling clubs are worthy of an excessive investment. This chart, while interesting, doesn’t do much to clarify that debate; we still don’t know if NBA teams spend because they’re good or if they’re good because they spend, and it’s difficult to determine that much without control data taken in different league conditions within the same sport.

So here we are, right where we were: some NBA teams spend intelligently, and some do not, and both of those facts are separate from the total payroll of the teams in question. Here’s hoping the league and the union have more conclusive data to back their competitive equity claims in their negotiations than the limited correlations we try to draw facts from on the outside.

NFL players say LeBron should stick to basketball

LeBron NFL commercial

LeBron James should be in Heat training camp, but because he’s got more time on his hands he sounds a little bored.

Which led him to tweeting about when an NFL team could sign a free agent the other day. Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll picked up on that and went so far as Carroll getting a LeBron jersey made (with a kicker’s number, but we’ll let that go).

But it’s an intriguing question — could LeBron transfer his skills to the gridiron? Fox Sports Ohio asked a few players.

“It wouldn’t be easy,” Cincinnati Bengals cornerback Leon Hall said. “I recommend he keep his NBA contract and just play the Madden video games if he misses football.”

LeBron’s athleticism is not in question. He’s listed at 6’8” and 250 pounds, and when you see him in an NBA locker room he’s one of only a handful of guys you see and think “he has an NFL body.” You could see him as an explosive tight end with soft hands who would be nearly impossible to stop on a high ball in the end zone. Other basketball guys have made the transition to NFL tight end — Antonio Gates and Jermichael Finley currently.

But there’s that whole issue of contact. LeBron powers through arms while driving to the hoop, but a hit from a 260-pound linebacker in pads is a few levels up the pain meter. Another Bengals defensive back, Chris Crocker, played for the Browns at the same time LeBron was with the Cavs and saw him a lot.

“There aren’t many guys with the athleticism and strength LeBron has in any sport,” Crocker said. “But I also think guys pick the sports they pick for a reason. Just like (Chad) Ochocinco thinks he’s a soccer player until he gets up close and sees how skilled pro soccer players really are, there’s nothing easy about the NFL.”

In the end, we all know this is not going to happen. There are at least $15 million reasons why (the difference between what LeBron makes in the NBA and would make in the NFL).

Nate Robinson he says may try NFL during NBA lockout

Dallas Mavericks v Oklahoma City Thunder - Game Three

Apparently, Nate Robinson loves all sports that are locked out.

Plenty of people forget that before Nate Robinson was an undersized NBA point guard he was an undersized cornerback for the University of Washington — his original scholarship to the school was for football.

So with the NBA lockout suck in the mud and the NFL lockout apparently inching toward a conclusion he wouldn’t mind returning to his roots, he told SLAM Magazine.

“I might go play football,” the 5-foot-9 Robinson said. “Do something that nobody’s tried to do…. If I can, I would love to play football a little bit. I’ve been doing a little bit of training…. Why wouldn’t you want to have an NBA player that can play football try out? That’s a lot of publicity for your organization.”

If we really want to be practical — and we talked about NBA players like Amar’e Stoudemire balking at playing overseas because an injury could wipe out their NBA contracts — playing NFL football makes it seem like Robinson doesn’t really want the remaining $4.5 million on his deal.

But frankly, we’d love to see it. This sounds like the kind of player/personnel move the Redskins would make, they should bring him in. Robinson’s not going to do any worse on 6’3” Larry Fitzgerald than most other corners.