Tag: New York Knicks

Chicago Bulls v Washington Wizards - NBA Global Games Rio 2013

Wizards flirt with Luol Deng, trying to make Trevor Ariza jealous


The Wizards, after their second playoff-series win since 1982, are putting a big emphasis on continuity.

Randy Wittman – retained.

Andre Miller – returning.

Marcin Gortat – re-signing.

That leaves Trevor Ariza as the biggest asset hanging in the wind.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:


David Aldridge of NBA.com:


At one point, Ariza seemed close to re-signing with the Wizards. But he has plenty of other suitors. Once LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony sign, Ariza will draw plenty of attention.

I’m confident he can get more than $9 million per year if he plays his cards right. Heck, he can probably play his cards wrong and get more than $9 million per year.

Deng is another second-tier free agent small forward waiting for LeBron and Melo to sign. Like Ariza, Deng could get a pretty high salary, as several teams are intersted.

However, after committing $12 million per year to Gortat, the Wizards can probably offer Deng only the mid-level exception. Maybe they can increase that offer slightly with a little creativity, but still wouldn’t be enough for me to take Deng to Washington seriously.

Unlike with Deng, the Wizards have bird rights to exceed the cap to sign Ariza. They can theoretically offer him anything up to a max contract.

Undoubtedly, the Wizards want to re-sign Ariza. I think they’ll ultimately have to offer more than $9 million per year, but they can wait a little to let the market establish itself.

However, Washington simultaneously courting Deng shouldn’t worry Ariza. Ariza, an unrestricted free agent, has the leverage here.

Suns first-round pick Bogdan Bogdanovic agrees to delay joining NBA

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First-round picks count against a team’s cap at the rookie-scale amount, a prescribed salary based on pick number, until one of three things happens:

  • They sign a contract. Then they count at their actual salary, which is usually 120 percent of scale.
  • They get renounced. This has happened just once – the Bulls with Travis Knight in 1996.
  • They sign a letter pledging not to join the NBA for a year. Then, they come off the cap completely for that year.

The Suns have convinced Bogdan Bogdanovic, whom they drafted No. 27, to take the third option.

Mark Deeks of ShamSports.com:

Likely, the Suns knew Bogdanovic would sign this letter when they drafted him. They might have even chosen him over prospects they rated higher in a vacuum because he signed this letter.

Even if they can’t lure LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony – though that is still technically possible, I suppose – the Suns want to maximize cap room for free agents.

They also just drafted T.J. Warren and Tyler Ennis, adding two rookies to an already young roster. Players need minutes to grow, and playing time is already tight in the desert. By adding Bogdanovic later, Phoenix can stager its developmental burden.

The Suns couldn’t trade the No. 27 for a future first rounder as they desired, but this essentially gets them the same result.

Mark Cuban and Chandler Parsons apparently celebrating his offer sheet (photo)

Oklahoma City Thunder v Houston Rockets

Chandler Parsons planned to sign an offer sheet with the Mavericks. That was known.

But the timing was critical.

Mark your clock at 1:02 a.m. — give or take a few minutes when Parsons actually signed the deal and Dallas emailed it to the Rockets.

I figure Mark Cuban and Parsons didn’t celebrate until that was done.

The Rockets have 72 hours to match. If they match, Parsons counts against the cap at his 2014-15 salary ($14,746,000 if a max offer sheet), and Houston is essentially out of the picture for elite free agents like Carmelo Anthony and Chris Bosh. (Melo is probably unavailable regardless.)

Until then, Parsons’ cap hold is $2,875,130. That gives the the Rockets, especially if they trade Jeremy Lin, leeway to work.

Essentially, Houston has three days to pare down its roster and then convince Bosh to accept less than a max contract.

How many players do the Rockets need to deal? How much can they convince to Bosh to sacrifice? Can they convince him to leave Miami at all?

If the Rockets want to keep Parsons, they have 72 hours to answer those tough questions and then match Dallas’ offer.

Report: Minnesota still in no rush to trade Kevin Love, not to Cleveland or anyone

Denver Nuggets v Minnesota Timberwolves

Everybody thought Flip Saunders was under pressure to pull the trigger on a Kevin Love trade at the NBA Draft — from Love’s agent/camp to other teams there was a lot of work, which led to a lot of hype.

Saunders decided to wait.

Now out of Cleveland — where it just has been assumed for days that LeBron James returning was a done deal and fans have moved on to the next steps in their heads — comes the belief that once LeBron makes his (obvious to them) announcement a Kevin Love trade to Cleveland will follow closely behind.

But again, Saunders is going to be patent, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports.

A trade for Love would have to center around Andrew Wiggins, but the Timberwolves want more established players as well (remember they have wanted guys more like Taj Gibson and Klay Thompson). It’s not a simple deal.

Since the draft the plan in Minnesota has followed this logic: Once teams get strike one on LeBron and Carmelo Anthony, then get strike two on second wave of guys (maybe Chris Bosh, certainly Pau Gasol and Luol Deng) they will get desperate. That’s when teams will start to make better trade offers for Love.

Do the Warriors see Bosh added to the Rockets (or Anthony to the Lakers) and decide they need to make a big move and throw Klay Thompson in a deal after all? Maybe not the Warriors, maybe not that specific scenario, but the Timberwolves see something in that mold playing out and can sit back and wait for someone to make a better offer. they are not rushed.

This is what Masai Ujiri did in the Carmelo Anthony situation in Denver — wait and wait and wait until somebody gets desperate and makes a big offer (in this case it was James Dolan over the head of then Knicks’ GM Donnie Walsh). Saunders takes heart in that, and if he has to wait until the deadline he will.

Which could leave some frustrated people in Cleveland and other cities as he waits.

Does Kobe Bryant want Byron Scott to coach the Lakers? “Yep.”

Cleveland Cavaliers coach Scott gives instructions to his team during their NBA basketball game against New York Knicks in New York

Byron Scott has been the front-runner to land the Lakers coaching job from Day 1 — he’s a Buss family favorite who lets the Lakers sell the “we’re going with someone from inside the family” line. (Remember Scott was a shooting guard on the Showtime Lakers and has the rings to prove it.)

The Lakers have left the coaching door open as part of their package to entice free agents, but Scott was always the guy standing in the doorway. Wednesday he got a big endorsement — Kobe Bryant.

Via Dave McMenamin of ESPNLosAngeles.com.

Now, if this was 2006 Kobe and he had that kind of sway in the organization, Scott would be hired already. But the Lakers are looking at free agents that can lead them into the future (Carmelo Anthony remains dangling out there, even if there are now serious doubts) and if getting them the coach they want would help, that door is open.

Scott has coached more than 900 NBA games over all or part of 13 seasons, being named NBA coach of the year in 2008 (with Chris Paul and the Hornets) and having led the then New Jersey Nets to the NBA Finals in the Jason Kidd era. He’s an old school task master coach (the Pat Riley influence) but one who has been a player and gets that side of it. He struggled with his last job, three seasons in Cleveland trying to develop the Cavaliers talent and never winning more than 24 games.

As usual, in the end Kobe likely gets his way. And that means Scott coaching the Lakers. But that domino likely doesn’t fall until the Anthony one does.

By the way, Kobe said he’s like Anthony as a teammate. Shocking.