Tag: New Jersey Nets

Rajon Rondo

Rajon Rondo explains why he is best point guard in NBA


Rajon Rondo is convinced he is the best point guard in the NBA. We’ve heard him say it before, laughed to ourselves (or rolled our eyes), patted him on the back and said, “sure you are, kid” then moved on.

But Rondo isn’t backing down.

And in the cover story of the current edition of Boston Common Magazine (which I was pointed to by WEEI and SLAM, because I let my subscription lapse) Rondo detailed why he is the man.

“It’s always the whole package,” he says. “Some fans look at a point guard and say he had 26 points, seven assists, and eight rebounds, and they’ll say he had a great game. But there is a lot of talent in the NBA, and eventually that talent catches up with you. The mental game is where it’s at. I would say the game is 80 percent mental and 20 percent physical, for me at least. What separates great players from good ones is performing consistently. I can dominate the game in any number of ways, not just with the numbers.”

“My definition of what a good point guard is might be different from what some others might think,” he says. “I’ll give you an example: If [head coach] Doc Rivers gets thrown out, I can run the team for the rest of the game. I know what plays to call, what sets to call, or when to call time outs. It’s more than keeping track of the score. There is so much more going on that you take for granted on any given night, and there are only so many guys who can run a team when you don’t have a coach. In that category I think I am the best at what I do.”

The problem with the “who is best” argument is you end up with an elite point guard like Rondo and you have to tear him down. And we shouldn’t, we should celebrate the fact that Rondo is very good at controlling the flow of the game, that he is a very good defender. Rondo is a great fit for the Celtics (and has looked like a confident leader through a couple preseason games).

But Chris Paul does all that and is a better shooter. He is actually as good or better at controlling the tempo of the game, of playing chess to everyone else’s checkers. And while Rondo can take over a game if Rivers gets tossed, CP3 has Vinny Del Negro on the sidelines every night.

But we are splitting hairs here. Paul, Rondo, Deron Williams are on their own level (Steve Nash is step back to me due to his defense and age). I’d put CP3 at the head of the pack, but it’s not a big step. And as we’ve said before, I wouldn’t want Rondo to think any other way than that he is the best.

Man, we really need some games to start breaking down.

With smile on his face, Cuban fires back at Deron Williams

Mark Cuban

Mark Cuban loves this kind of through-the-media banter. Just ask Phil Jackson. Or Shaq. Or a host of others. Cuban is very good at saying something with a smile on his face but with a knife in his hands.

So when Deron Williams fired a shot at Mark Cuban saying the fact Cuban was off filming “Shark Tank” on the day Williams met with the Mavs sealed the deal he was going to the Nets, you knew Cuban would eventually fire back.

And he did, speaking to the media in Barcelona where his Mavs were about to lose a preseason game to FC Barcelona, via the Dallas Morning News.

“I’m a big D-Will fan, but I’m kind of surprised that he would throw his front office under the bus like that by saying that I would make a difference,’’ Cuban said before the Mavericks’ exhibition game against FC Barcelona Regal. “I would have expected him to say – like I’d expect one of our guys to say – ‘Hey I’m so thrilled with the front office and the moves we made and our team that it wouldn’t have mattered what he did.’…

“He’s a superstar point guard, but my goal is to build a team. That’s the important thing, to try to win championships.

“I’m flattered that he thought my presence would have made more of a difference than what the Nets’ management did.’’


To be clear, Cuban could have been there and brought Kate Hudson to pour glasses of Cristal and D-Will still probably would have chosen the Nets. That is where he was leaning. And he saw what the Nets were doing and heard what their long-term plans were. (Apparently those plans were to go over the cap and lock themselves into basically this roster for years, but it’s a plan.)

What Williams said was he had questions about the long-range plans in Dallas that GM Donnie Nelson and coach Rick Carlisle couldn’t satisfactorily answer. Sounds to me like Williams really threw those two under the bus.

And of course, if you are building a team, step one is to get a couple of superstars together, like Williams and, oh, I don’t know, maybe… Dirk Nowitizki? Someone like that.

Bulls’ Carlos Boozer says to judge him by wins, losses

Carlos Boozer

Carlos Boozer has frustrated fans in three cities. Cleveland for how he left. Utah and Chicago for how he played — good but never quite as good as expected.

Boozer is used to the criticism (the man played at Duke, not where you go if you want basketball fans everywhere to love you). He’s heard Bulls fans complain about his production and numbers. But he also knows that the criticism quiets when the team wins, and that is his focus.

Here is what he told the Sun Times.

“People look at it from the wrong perspective,’’ Boozer said. “This isn’t Utah, and this isn’t just a team with me and [former Jazz point guard] Deron Williams on it. We’re playing with five scorers here, so your touches aren’t going to be the same, your looks aren’t going to be the same. It’s a different system.

“All the people should worry about is if we win. Criticize me if we lose, but if we win, just praise us.’’

This year that might open up the door to criticism. Without Derrick Rose for much of the season, the Bulls likely are a playoff team (they still defend and play hard for Tom Thibodeau) but they are not a threat. They are not the team with the best record in the East the two previous seasons. They are vulnerable. They are not contenders.

With Rose back Chicago could become the seven seed nobody wants to face. Could. But this is going to be a tougher year in Chicago, and Boozer knows the criticism is coming. Loudly. He’s just kind of used to it.

And he knows he’ll hear it until he is wearing a ring.