Tag: New Jersey Nets

Dallas Mavericks owner Cuban reacts during the second half of their NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers in Dallas

For Mavericks, it is better to have swung for fences and missed than not swung at all


Mark Cuban took a risk, and he knew what could happen.

He did his best Dave Kingman impression — he swung for the fences, not fearing the strike out.

On one level this looks like a disaster of a summer for Dallas — no Deron Williams then no Steve Nash and no real shot at Dwight Howard. Jason Terry bolts for Boston. Jason Terry nearly says yes then leaves him at the alter, choosing the Knicks. It’s cheap and easy talk show fodder.

Cuban can live with it. He knows he made was the right play. Here is what he told Sam Amick of Sports Illustrated on Wednesday (before Jason Kidd stood him up at the altar).

“It’s better to miss out on the right player than to sign the wrong player.”

Or put another way, it is better to miss and end up at the NBA’s bottom — where you can have cap space and draft picks to rebuild a contender — rather than live with mediocrity.

And the rules have changed with the new CBA, Cuban sees what the Nets have done and thinks they don’t get it. Here is what he told Stephen Bondy of the New York Daily News:

“If they spend on bad contracts, particularly contracts signed under old CBA, then it doesn’t matter how much you spend… You are locked in to only being able to improve your team using the tax payers exception. That puts you at a distinct disadvantage.”

And he is right. He gets how to build a winner in the NBA now, and while it may not be pretty all the time — or downright ugly, like the last 48 hours — what you don’t want to do is just be average. There are a lot of teams stuck in the rut of being average in the NBA and they don’t know how to break out of it.

Cuban’s risks were well documented.

He shattered the traditional model — his team won the 2011 NBA title and he broke it up rather than overpay to keep it together and try to win another ring. Tyson Chandler was allowed to walk to the Knicks. Caron Butler, DeShawn Stevenson and other players left as Mark Cuban read the writing on the wall about the new labor agreement and knew this was his window to strip down the roster’s payroll. Then rebuild this summer when Shawn Marion and Jason Kidd’s deals came off the rolls.

It was a well laid out plan that didn’t work out. And unless things change dramatically the Mavericks will be mediocre next season.

But they will go into the trade deadline and next summer with a lot of cap space and flexibility, and they can again swing for the fences.

And some day, they are going to connect.

Cuban will just be leaning back when it happens, with a Cheshire cat grin on his face. He knew it would happen. And he took the risks to make it happen.

Thursday And-1 links: Maybe Indy will not match Hibbert offer

Roy Hibbert, Tim Duncan

Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points.

• I have said I expect the Indiana Pacers to match the max-offer (four years, $58 million) that the Trail Blazers gave Roy Hibbert. Because to me, Indy is pretty average without a true center like Hibbert in the paint and they had to know they would be paying him $12 million or so a year anyway. But Mike Wells, the Pacers beat writer for the Indy Star, doesn’t think they will match it. He’s much closer, maybe I read it wrong. Hibbert will sign the Portland offer July 11 and the Pacers will have three days to make the call.

• The Knicks are still really trying to re-sign J.R. Smith.

• Nicolas Batum’s agent met with the Trail Blazers front office Thursday and the Blazers came out of the meeting and said they will match any qualifying offer he signs and they will not discuss a sign-and-trade. That will keep his value down.

• The Clippers, Pacers, Bulls, Mavs and Wizards are all going after Courtney Lee after the Rockets yanked their qualifying offer. Lee is a free agent.

• Is getting the gang back together for one more run the smart play for the Celtics?

• There are a lot of teams interested in Brandon Roy.

• Rashard Lewis is meeting with the Miami Heat this week. Don’t laugh, at a veteran’s minimum deal he is a stretch four that fits their new small-ball identity.

• Look for the Hawks to buy out Jordan Farmar (he was shipped to them as part of the Joe Johnson deal). That will make him a free agent.

• Dirk Nowitzki said he was ready to move on after Jason Terry agreed to terms with Boston. Wonder how he feels today?

• Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau talks his contract situation, also Derrick Rose’s recovery.

• The Kings have made an offer to Jason Thompson.

• The Lakers re-signed Darius Morris.

• The Bobcats have waived Jamario Moon.

The Sacramento Kings arena situation still sucks.

Report: Kidd jilts Mavericks at altar, agrees to deal with Knicks

Jason Kidd

Mark Cuban’s “tear it down to build it back up” plan has worked out about as well as Napoleon invading Russia so far. No Deron Williams. No Steve Nash. No Dwight Howard (yet, at least). Jason Terry leaves for Boston.

And now Jason Kidd, who the Mavs said they were near a deal with, has jilted them at the altar and will instead sign a multi-year deal with the Knicks, reports Marc Stein at ESPN.

With the Mavericks confident that they were closing in Thursday on a verbal agreement on a three-year deal with Kidd worth $9 million, sources told ESPN.com that Kidd — after all-day deliberations with both teams — has decided instead to leave Dallas to join the Knicks for a similar deal.

Sources briefed on the matter told ESPN.com that Kidd was ultimately swayed to take the Knicks’ offer to come to New York and take on the challenge of trying to help the Knicks move into the Eastern Conference and also mentor fans darling’ Jeremy Lin.

Everyone may want to steer clear of Mark Cuban for the next 48 hours or so. At least. Just for your own protection.

Not sure where this leaves Raymond Felton, who reportedly was going to New York also. Probably out in the cold, looking for another team to join. The Knicks don’t need Kidd, Felton an Jeremy Lin. And Lin is maybe the most secure of all of them.

For New York, this is a decent if not thrilling signing. Kidd gives the Knicks a solid point guard who can space the floor with threes and doesn’t need to dominate the ball. Which is good, because the offense runs through Carmelo Anthony.

Kidd is entering his 19th NBA season and will go down as one of the game’s best point guards. But he is not that guy anymore at age 39. Last season Kidd gave the Mavericks 28 minutes with 6.2 points and 5.5 assists per game, and his play was solid if not his old spectacular self. He also missed 18 regular season games due to injury.

Nets push Teletović to take mini mid-level so Howard, other doors open up


The Nets like to make things hard on themselves. But they apparently have just cleared one more hurdle to making the very difficult trade to bring Dwight Howard to Brooklyn a little more possible.

They may have reached a deal to get Mirza Teletović to take a smaller offer than they verbally agreed to, which will keep the hard salary cap they nearly imposed on themselves away, according to ESPN’s Larry Coon and CBSSports.com’s Ken Berger. Removing that cap makes the finances of a Dwight Howard trade possible.

This gets complex, so stick with me.

Tuesday it was announced the Nets had agreed to terms with European stretch four Mirza Teletović for the $5 million mid-level exception for three years. Something they could offer.

However, because with salary and “cap holds” (slots reserved for their free agents to re-sign) the Nets were over the salary cap ($58 million) and below the luxury tax line ($70 million), so on July 11 when they signed Teletovic to that deal they would activate the “apron” or hard salary cap in the new CBA, which is at $74.3 million. This provision was put in the CBA at the insistence of smaller market owners who didn’t like to see the high-spending teams (Lakers, Celtics, Knicks etc..) keep adding players via the mid-level exception every season with impunity.

If the Nets had that hard cap there was really no way to pull off a Howard trade — Howard will make $19 million, Joe Johnson makes $19 million, Deron Williams $17 million, Gerald Wallace $10 million and throw in the rookies and you have a Nets roster at about $70 million and still needing to add at least seven players. Even at minimum deals you can’t really pulls that off in the NBA, not with any kind of quality.

However, the Nets are close to getting Teletović to take the mini mid-level of $3 million. If they do that, there is no hard cap triggered and the Nets can take on more salary back in a Dwight Howard trade. Or really make any other large move.

Now, that’s just the math of it. The Nets still need to convince the Magic that the package they have been rejecting for nearly a year — Brook Lopez, Kris Humphries, MarShon Brooks and some picks — is now good enough for them. And to make it work, they need at least a third team to take on Humphries and what likely is an oversized new deal.

So good luck with that. But at least the math could be there now.

Kidd bails on multi-year deal to return to Dallas, going to Knicks

New York Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin defends Dallas Mavericks point guard Jason Kidd in the second half of their NBA basketball game at Madison Square Garden in New York

UPDATE 5:03 pm: No Jason Kidd, either.

Mavericks officials thought they had a deal close, as you can read below, but Kidd has decided to become the new point guard for Mike Woodson and the New York Knicks. That is a punch to the gut.

2:09 pm: No Deron Williams. No Steve Nash.

So the Dallas Mavericks are back with 39-year-old Jason Kidd, and they are not talking a one-year deal either, reports ESPN.

Sources with knowledge of the deal specifics told ESPN.com’s Marc Stein that Kidd’s contract will be a three-year deal worth $9 million, taking him to age 42 if he plays it all the way out.

Kidd has played 18 NBA seasons and is one of the legendary point guards of the game, but he is well into the back end of his career. Last season Kidd gave the Mavericks 28 minutes with 6.2 points and 5.5 assists per game, and his play was solid if not his old spectacular self. He also missed 18 regular season games due to injury.

Kidd may not play all three years and may be a trade chip depending on what direction the Mavericks go as they try to reload — or maybe flat out rebuild — over the next few years.