Tag: New Jersey Nets

Miami Heat's Eddy Curry poses during media day at the team's training camp in Miami

Nets exploring adding Eddy Curry, Josh Childress among others


At this point, you have to wonder if the Nets will be sad when they have no more roster spots to spend money on. Yahoo Sports reports that the Nets are considering several options for their final two available roster spots including… Eddy Curry.

The Nets could use Curry. They’re not particularly loaded down low and even with Reggie Evans, having some center insurance wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world. But Curry (along with Hilton Armstrong, also mentioned by Yahoo!) isn’t the only player they’re looking at. The Nets have 13 players, leaving them two spots to spend money on. And they love spending money on players.

The New York Post reports:

The Nets could consider possibilities such as Josh Childress, Sam Young and their own free agent, Damion James.

via Former New York Knick Eddy Curry, along with fellow center journeyman Hilton Armstrong, work out for Brooklyn Nets – NYPOST.com.

The Nets were expected to sign Donte Green, but a possible fractured ankle leaves that in doubt.

While Childress gives them a high amount of athleticism,  and James provides much the same, Young might honestly be the best option. The second unit could struggle to create points outside of MarShon Brooks, and Young is a willing defender from his time in Memphis. He needs to not have the ball in his hands, but on a team like the Nets, that shouldn’t be an issue.

Either way, can’t wait for the Nets to petition the league to allow them to sign 20 guys even if they can still only dress 12.

The Inbounds: It’s time for NBA teams to embrace the D-League future

Image (1) D-league-thumb-250x256-12043.gif for post 2083

The 2012-2013 NBA D-League schedule will be announced Thursday to little fanfare and by little fanfare I mean no attention whatsoever. It will be a footnote passed along at the end of columns, random bits tweeted here and there. It will not drive traffic, move the needle, or sell tickets, outside of the occasionally rabid fanbases (and there are are, shockingly, a number of them in the league).

But what will be lost in all this hoopla is the complication for teams keeping an eye on their affiliate, if they don’t own their own. From the official release back in Joo-Lie:

San Antonio Spurs

Atlanta Hawks
Los Angeles Clippers
Phoenix Suns
Toronto Raptors

Cleveland Cavaliers

Golden State Warriors

New York Knicks

Charlotte Bobcats
Detroit Pistons
Indiana Pacers
Milwaukee Bucks

Portland Trail Blazers

IOWA ENERGY (Des Moines, IA)
Chicago Bulls
Denver Nuggets
New Orleans Hornets
Washington Wizards

Los Angeles Lakers

Boston Celtics

Memphis Grizzlies
Sacramento Kings
Utah Jazz

Houston Rockets

Miami Heat
Minnesota Timberwolves
Orlando Magic
Philadelphia 76ers

Brooklyn Nets

Dallas Mavericks

Oklahoma City Thunder

That’s 19 teams crammed into five affiliates. Now, this is not any sort of failure for the D-League. On the contrary, this is amazing. Eleven teams have one-to-one affiliations with their D-League squad, more than a third of the league. This is nothing short of a miracle, considering that five years ago, there were…two. And this is after the Utah Flash which had a close relationship with the Jazz folded.

The league is not coming. It’s here. The D-League is a legitimate part of day-to-day NBA business and more and more teams are figuring out the advantages and how to use the clubs effectively to find and develop talent. This is not the small piece of packaging it’s made out to be by some. The league operates under conditions where so many players with legitimate talent flame out simply because they’re not ready, and simply disappear. Having a development system that’s legitimate will allow for those players to have successful careers in some cases. Even if it’s just a handful of players saved over a decade, isn’t that worth it, both for the lives of the players and for the teams to get return on investment?

And yet still, we’ve got 19 teams dragging their feet on this. The D-League has maintained it’s not ready for rapid expansion, that it’s honestly handling the most it can at one time. But it’s not like this situation can’t get resolved pretty quickly. It just involves the team throwing some money to get this thing moving. You can set up and establish a D-League team for less than it costs to pay Johan Petro for a year. Think about that. There are costs to run the club, which is going to be more than having a player on squad. Bu there’s also the hybrid option, first pioneered by the Houston Rockets, who own their affiliate, the Rio Grande Valley Vipers’, basketball operations, while local ownership owns the rest of the team. It’s a cost-effective model for both sides that allows the NBA team to maintain complete control over coaching, training, equipment, and direction.

Why are the Wizards, who have been using D-League talent to fill out their roster for years, not a single-affiliate? Why are the Heat, with gobs and gobs of money, not setting up somewhere to send Norris Cole to work on his patience? Don’t the Clippers need a joint to send players for rehab, for crying out loud?

The more broke teams, you can understand. Charlotte needs every penny it can get.

But we’re approaching a breaking point. The quality of these teams could go up if multiple teams start sending down second-round picks. It could be great for the league. But it could also cause a mess with four teams with different agendas upset over the direction or minutes being distributed. No one’s going to freak out, this is the D-League we’re talking about. But teams should take how their players are treated seriously, how that development goes seriously.

We’re rapidly getting to that point. The league has been very careful not to expand during the shaky economy, nor before nor after the lockout. President Dan Reed has been about as considerate as you can be with growing the league at a steady rate without ballooning too fast. But at this point, it’s beyond the D-League’s control. They’ve built a respectable system that provides talent the league is using. They’ve gotten some of the best teams in the league to buy-in. (The Spurs, the Mavericks, the Lakers, the Thunder, the Knicks, the Nets all have their own affiliate.) At some point the rest of the league needs to get its head out of the sand and quit holding up progress.

The NBA D-League needs to become a true minor-league system, a goal its had since its inception, and one that it’s moved much closer to over the past half-decade. But to get there, the rest of the league has to get over its phobia and understand the potential that’s there. It doesn’t need to be a joke for a top-ten pick to get sent down. If it’s a project big man (*COUGH* ANDRE DRUMMOND* COUGH*) spending a year dominating inferior competition and working on his strength training might be better than throwing him to the wolves right off the bat. The league needs to wake up and realize what’s happening and quit allowing its competition to run circles around it. You’ve got assets. Use them.

Kris Humphries sued by woman claiming he gave her STD. Eww.

Philadelphia 76ers v New Jersey Nets

Oh, Kris. You really need to work on staying off of TMZ’s front page.

But alas, Kris Humphries — the short-lived Mr. Kardashian — is bing sued by a woman in Los Angeles who claims the Brooklyn power forward gave her an STD. Of course, TMZ with the scoop.

Kris Humphries has just been sued by a woman who claims he gave her herpes … TMZ has learned. Kayla Goldberg claims she met Kris in August, 2010 at the Newsroom Cafe on Robertson Blvd. in L.A….

An NBA player and celebrity getting a woman in to bed is usually about as challenging as boiling water, so you can guess where it went from there.

The lawsuit claims Kris did not inform Kayla he had herpes — and she claims in the suit that he did indeed have the disease. Kayla says a week later she was diagnosed with herpes.

Humphries did not comment yet. This would have been before his reality show marriage. I’m not going to get into the gory details of the case because this was enough to get me to feel like I need a shower. Not just a regular shower, one of those Center For Disease Control Lysol showers after you worked with the ebola virus. If you want more, TMZ has it.

Humphries… keep your head down, your pants zipped and just play basketball for a while. You’re pretty good when you do that. Off the court you are a train wreck.

Chalmers: I’m on “front end of the top 10” point guards

Oklahoma City Thunder v Miami Heat - Game Five

Mario Chalmers has never lacked for confidence.

That has paid off for the Kansas Jayhawks when he sank the NCAA title-winning shot. It has paid off for the Miami Heat, giving them another guy who doesn’t fear the big shot at the end of games.

But with that confidence can come the belief that you are better than you are. Bleacher Report’s Peter Emerick spoke with Chalmers at a Spaulding event and asked him about Rajon Rondo’s claim the Celtic was the best point guard in the game.

“He’s not the best, but he’s in the top five. There are a lot of great point guards in the league, Deron Williams, Chris Pauland Steve Nash. There are a lot of great guards in the NBA so for him to say he’s the best is a pretty bold statement. I’d say that I [Mario Chalmers] am in the front end of the top 10.”

I like Chalmers game more than most and I think his style and swagger work pretty well with a Heat team where he is not the guy handling the ball and creating the offense most of the time anyway. But that’s a pretty heightened view of his standing in the league.

Just off the top of my head the guys clearly on a level above Chalmers are (in no particular order): Rajon Rondo, Derrick Rose, Deron Williams, Kyrie Irving, Russell Westbrook, Ty Lawson, Ricky Rubio, Steve Nash, Chris Paul, Tony Parker and Kyle Lowry.

That’s 11. Which means that if you want to make an argument that Chalmers is the 12th best point guard in the NBA, I’ll listen to it. But on the front end of the top-10? Well, we like our players to think big. So go for it, Mario.

Tyshawn Taylor talks about dealing with friends wanting money

Final Four - Ohio State v Kansas

Last week was the Rookie Transition Program, which is where the league brings in all its first-year players (and this time second-year players, too, as there was no program after the lockout) and tells them all about the friends and family who are going to try and leech their money, women who are going to come on to them with ill intent, and suggest they may want to save some money off their paychecks rather than buying that fourth car as a rookie.

Tyshawn Taylor was in that class and then headed back in Lawrence, Kansas, where he went to college.

The new Net grew up in New Jersey not far from New York and now he is moving back home to play in Brooklyn. Home, where there are a lot of old friends. Some of whom wouldn’t mind a piece of Taylor’s money. You can bet some of his group who will come right out and ask him for money. He was up front in talking about it to the Lawrence Journal-World.

“I think that’s going to happen whether I’m home (in New Jersey) or not. It’s a little bit easier for them to get access to me being close to home. It was something I was going to have to deal with anyway,” Taylor said. “I am dealing with it. It is what it is. I can say no. I know who I can give money to and who not. It’s cool. Being in New York is not hard. It’s where I’m from. I am home thinking I’m Tyshawn, but I’m not just Tyshawn to everybody else.”

The NBA life is an adjustment. Not just on the court, but off it as well. And plenty of guys get swept up in that and lose focus on the game. Taylor seems to have his head screwed on about the issue, but every guy in the league faces this. All the time.