Tag: Nene

Nene nuggets

Nene totally might have possibly gone to Houston if a trade that didn’t happen had happened. This is a thing, for some reason.


I’m begging you to let this story die. No one’s happy with how the first Chris Paul trade fell apart. The NBA shouldn’t have owned the team, so that it wouldn’t have been in a position to turn down the trade as the owner (not the league; to say otherwise is basically twisting reality and ignoring facts, which you can do but you’ll be wrong). Dell Demps should not have been put in a position to consider that he had autonomy only to have it yanked away. The Rockets and Lakers should not have been led to believe they were dealing with a sovereign entity when they were not, and David Stern should not have put himself in the position to have to act simultaneously as Commissioner and owner.

No one’s happy. The fans, the players, the media, the league, the management, anyone. Chris Paul’s fine with it, but he only wanted out. Once that happened it wasn’t his problem anymore.

But this thing has to die. It was three months ago, it was a trade that never happened, that shouldn’t have been agreed to by a rebuilding team anyway, and it wouldn’t have solved all the problems or really most of the problems of any of the three teams.

And yet.

The Houston Chronicle decided to ask Nene about how he was supposed to have signed with Houston had they gotten Pau Gasol in the deal, and Nene was (shocker) inconclusive with his approach.

Nuggets center Nene did not quite confirm the widespread conjecture that he would have signed with the Rockets as a free agent had the Rockets’ proposed trade for Pau Gasol been completed, opening cap room to sign Nene. He did come close, referring to Houston as “a better spot.”

“We had a great conversation,” Nene said. “Kevin McHale is a legend. It was a privilege for me to sit down with him, have a little time with him. I like the city. I signed with Denver. I love Denver, but I still like this city. I have friends here.”

Asked if he would have signed with the Rockets, Nene laughed and said: “I can’t answer that. People think it.”

Nene cited a variety of reasons for his fondness for Houston, not the least of which was a quality Houston has that few NBA cities can match; ample humidity.

“It’s like Brazil,” Nene said. “It’s humid, like tropical. Nice. I like the players that play here. I love Denver. All my career is right there. Friends. Family. I’m in a good spot. I could have been in a better spot, but I’m in a good spot right now.”

via Ultimate Rockets » Nuggets’ Nene shares his fondness for Houston.

Yeah, those NBA players definitely do make free agency decisions to give up significant money because of humidity. Happens all the time.


Look, they may have gotten Nene. It’s possible. They wouldn’t have been really all that much better because neither Gasol nor Nene are great rebounders, their defense would suffer and the skillsets are slightly redundant. (Check this out for more on that.) He could have signed with Denver anyway, because of the money and situation. There’s no way to know. But dragging up this trade over and over again in a vain hope of tearing down the league for something that’s over with and was the right decision regardless is insane. There are a lot of ways to make the Rockets a contender with that roster.

Nene and Gasol was a bandaid on a bullet hole.

Lakers down Nuggets thanks to… we’re not sure. It was weird.

Denver Nuggets v Los Angeles Lakers

You know those games where you just don’t really know what happened? You walk away and you acknowledge that the game was fun, but you just don’t really know what happened? Yeah that was Denver vs. L.A. at Staples today, Lakers 92-89 win.

In the final five minutes the following things happened:

Danilo Gallinari missed a game-tying layup wide open with 3 seconds left and no one has around him.

Kobe Bryant missed a free throw to put the game away with a four point lead and one second left.

Kobe Bryant lost the ball and turned it over on a key drive.

Nene missed a wide open dunk.

Andre Miller failed to secure a great pass after an offensive rebound put the offense in motion, and then Gallinari missed everything but backboard on a wide open three.

Derek Fisher bodied Ty Lawson out of the way in a pretty blatant way then rolled on top of the ball and not only did not get called for a foul or traveling, but managed to get a timeout.

In short, it was bananas.

But if you want to strip all that away and get back to actual reasons why the Lakers got a win? It’s simple.

Andrew Bynum. Bynum was dominant inside.

Bynum looked very much like the kind of young center you build around. He blocked shots, and more importantly, tipped in miss after miss. His ability to, well, be taller than everyone else was simply too much for the Nuggets. The Lakers are winning ugly under Mike Brown with aging stars and a weak bench. But they’re winning. Because they execute and the effort is there on each possession. They have what you need to win in this league, even when things go a little… weird.


  • Nene is either still recovering from surgery or just not playing well. He looks tentative, he looks off. He’s not finishing when he should and of more concern, his box-outs and rotations are inconsistent. The Nuggets need more from him, especially for the money they gave him in free agency.
  • Ty Lawson needs to be running the offense exclusively down the stretch for the Nuggets.
  • Steve Blake continues with the patented “Laker who is en fuego early for no apparent reason” act.
  • Pau Gasol’s range is simply deadly and it has a remarkable ability to confound the defense.
  • Where was Arron Afflalo the last five minutes of the game? Benching the best pure shooter on the team late doesn’t make much sense.
  • Danilo Gallinari used to be able to shoot threes, right? I’m not imagining this.
  • Kobe was efficient and productive… until late in the game, again. Lakers fans have to be a little concerned. Gallo makes that layup and everything in this game might be different.
  • At some point, we’re going to have to talk about Al Harrington’s play, at both ends, and recognize that he’s playing exceptionally well. The offense? Sure, he’s got that. But his defense has been superb early, which no one saw coming.
  • Bynum’s patience has really improved, as has his comfort level in simply out-maneuvering defenders.

The Houston Rockets have not gotten over the Pau Gasol trade falling through

Spain's Pau Gasol looks at the timeboard

It was supposed to be different this time. After years of trying to trade for a legitimate star or sign one in free agency and having it fall apart at every turn, the Rockets were going to land their big fish. It was there on the table. It was agreed to by all parties.

And the league blocked it like Hakeem turning back a runner.

Everyone’s moved on. Chris Paul is a Clipper. Preseason games are in full swing. The Lakers brought in Troy Murphy… OK, so the Lakers haven’t really moved on. But the Rockets? The Rockets are soooooo mad  you guys.

From the Houston Chronicle:

By then, the person said, Alexander had no interest in speaking with Stern and has declined to speak with him since.

The Rockets had hoped with the added cap space to sign Nene, who instead returned to the Nuggets. With the bolstered front line, the Rockets intended to bring back Chuck Hayes to a roster they believed would then be in position to contend in the West.

“You can say he (Alexander) was very angry,” said the person, speaking on condition of anonymity. “He was on the phone with Daryl too many times that day to count. When the deal finally got done, he got a call from Daryl saying the deal was done. Afterwards, the commissioner said he didn’t think the deal was done. It was amazing. Daryl is extremely efficient and does things the proper way. Lakers owner Jerry Buss has been in the league 30 years and has made countless deals and thought the deal was done. Mitch Kupchak thought the deal was done. There was no question in his Alexanders and Daryls minds the deal was done.”

via Source: NBA commish lied about failed three-team trade that involved Rockets – Houston Chronicle.

The primary source of anger is because the Rockets and Lakers thought Demps had complete control to make the trade. And then he didn’t. Again, from the Chronicle:

“He said that David was briefed and that it was a done deal,” one of the individuals with knowledge of the talks said. “He (Demps) said multiple times that he briefed both of his local officials, (Hornets president) Hugh Webber and (Hornets chairman) Jac Sperling, and they and Dell at regular intervals were updating (NBA vice presidents) Stu Jackson and Joel Litvin and that they told David himself throughout the day. Also, Hugh and Jac, who were updating the league office, understood it to be a deal.”

via Source: NBA commish lied about failed three-team trade that involved Rockets – Houston Chronicle.

So the teams involved said it was done, and that the league office had been informed of the deal and was fine with it, and then wasn’t. That seems an awful lot like the league talked to some of its owners and the owners flipped out and cancelled the trade, which is something David Stern vehemently denied on a conference call following the Chris Paul Clippers trade. Stern reiterated that while Demps had authority to negotiate a deal, the final say rested with the league.

But again, if that was the case, why was the deal brought along so far?

On the other hand, here’s a question for the Rockets. Why are you so upset over this? Yes, you would have had Pau Gasol, which is a big name. But you still would have had to talk Nene into taking one-year less, or else paying an outrageous amount for him long-term. He and Gasol would have likely hit their downslide in similar timeframes, meaning you’d potentially have $35 million-plus wrapped up in two guys past their prime. And with the leftovers of your roster, where were you really going? Is Kyle Lowry-Terrence Williams-Chase Budinger-Pau Gasol-Nene really going to win the Western Conference? Is it going to get out of the second round? I’m not convinced it makes it out of the first. Anyone remember the last time Pau Gasol was the man on a playoff team without Kobe Bryant?

The Rockets have kept their flexibility. Maybe this move was to give the Rockets some push in terms of short-term success, but it didn’t provide a long-term answer. This could wind up being a blessing in disguise if they play their cards right.

The tangled web of Chris Paul, David Stern, and the blockbuster trade that wasn’t


Last Friday, David Stern — acting as some amalgam of both owner of the New Orleans Hornets and commissioner of the NBA — put the kibosh on a trade that would’ve sent Chris Paul to the Lakers, brought Luis Scola, Kevin Martin, and Lamar Odom to the Hornets, and shipped Pau Gasol to the Rockets. Those players would have significantly altered the futures of all three franchises involved in the deal, but thanks to Stern’s controversial decision, things have developed along a different timeline.

The ripple effects of Stern’s veto have been incredibly far-reaching, and upset the delicate balance of an already furious free agency period. Behold: an attempt to capture the 10-team, 28-player insanity that has resulted from Stern’s decision to block the Chris Paul blockbuster:


Chart made by Rob Mahoney.

See a full-size version of the image here.

Frank Vogel, the Indiana Pacers, and the “next step”

Pacers' head coach Vogel reacts during the first half of Game 1 of their NBA Eastern Conference first round playoff basketball game against the Bulls in Chicago
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The Indiana Pacers snuck into the NBA Playoffs last season thanks to weak competition among the middling teams of the Eastern Conference, but the playoff appearance itself — and the dogfight Indiana was able to give the Chicago Bulls in the first round — still meant plenty to the Pacers’ young, developing core. Then-interim head coach Frank Vogel did a fantastic job of preparing his team to play against a formidable opponent, and Indiana’s group of charming upstarts were able to make virtually every game of Chicago’s first-round series into a coin flip as a result. The Bulls won those coin flips and advanced — as elite teams are ought to do — but the Pacers nonetheless made their case as a team to watch going forward.

With his team’s playoff success in mind, Vogel is expecting big things from his team this season (via 1070 The Fan in Indy with JMV via Sports Radio Interviews):

“I fully expect this team to take the next step. We made some strides in making the playoffs last year and fell short against Chicago. We’re all a little bit bitter about that. We felt we coulda beat the Bulls and what we learned is that we can play with the best team in the NBA. We’re expecting to pick up right where we left off and we feel like we’re only scratching the surface of what we can accomplish.”

What exactly that next step will be is anyone’s guess, as the Pacers are due for an addition of some kind this off-season. Rumors have had Indiana linked to players from Nene to David West to Rajon Rondo, suggesting that when the smoke clears, we could be looking at a significantly upgraded Pacers roster. Most of the current core will likely remain intact, but an addition at power forward seems like an inevitability at this point.

And with a more qualified power forward playing serious minutes, the Pacers look like an incredibly solid team. Tyler Hansbrough is a useful rotation player, but his lack of a pick-and-roll game made him a poor fit alongside Darren Collison. His spastic, energetic style still made him a productive member of the Pacers lineup, but his deficiencies only highlighted what a more capable player would be able to accomplish. Indiana was able to take Vogel’s “next step” regardless of any roster additions, but with the draft-night trade for George Hill and a potential free agent addition, the Pacers look poised to take a hop and a skip in the right direction. The ceiling on this bunch may not be too high (even with a substantial addition, Indy is a far cry from a contender), but they have productive players across the board and a capable coach to put it all together. It could be — and has been — much worse in Indianapolis.