Tag: Nene

Nene Hilario

No timeline for Nene’s return to Washington lineup

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The Wizards are not the same team without Nene on the court — he can protect the rim on defense, score from the low post on offense and essentially give them a quality presence in the paint.

But it may be a while before they have that.

Nene had been on the “expect him to miss training camp but he should be good to go for the season” list due to plantar fasciitis (something he battled last season), but now that timeline seems more vague. As in there isn’t one. Here is Nene’s quote on being ready for the start of the season, via CSNWashington.com.

“I hope to. We’ll be positive. We’ll work to be on that time,” Nene recently said about the timetable for his return.

Coach Randy Wittman was less helpful with his vague answer. So we really have no idea.

The problem with plantar fasciitis — a tightness of the tissue along the bottom of the foot that leads to pain when walking or running — is that the only real cure is rest. Nene got some last season but then played through it for Brazil at the Summer Olympics. Now the Wizards are just waiting it out.

Washington has dreams of a playoff berth this season but their margin for error is slim. And without Nene slim looks a lot more like none. Just keep this on the something to watch list.

The Wizards and a future of risk

Wizards uniform, logo

You know what I’d be angling for, were I an NBA GM?

A boat. Because those guys make a lot of money and I want a boat.

I’d also be angling for the Washington Wizards’ 2014 and 2015 first rounders.

Getting future firsts is difficult in the NBA. NBA front offices take a lot of flak for their decisions, but in general, they understand that you never know what can happen and you want to hold onto those things. Most teams have a pretty good sense of what the future holds. But the Wizards? They seem like they understand what the future holds, but they’re just not considerably concerned with it. As long as they win now, that’s what matters.

The Wizards’ trade of Rashard Lewis and his buyout-able contract to clear cap space to New Orleans for Emeka Okafor and Trevor Ariza wasn’t a horrible move. There have been considerably worse trades made over the course of the past five years by other teams, and a few by the Wizards. A lot of it comes down to this: if you’re going to get nothing for Lewis, and then have to overpay with long-term contracts for veterans to move forward as a franchise, why not get something for Lewis and get contracts which have a shorter (but not expiring) shelf-life?

It’s a reasonable approach. It doesn’t mean that they can’t draft the best player available with the third pick. It doesn’t mean that they can’t move forward with the remaining young players that they have. It just means they didn’t give out money to veterans who would have wanted five-year deals. It does, however, mean that they are in win-now-while-building-for-the-future mode. That’s a popular approach right now. The Denver Nuggets are a great example of that. They can compete right now, make the playoffs, excel, but they’re also set to make a big move if one comes available. The Houston Rockets are right below them in that regard. So that’s kind of the approach. “Get better for the future while also getting the fanbase to appreciate you not being terrible.” That doesn’t sound so bad, right?

The problem is that the Nuggets have affixed themselves with players of high value and low-cost with younger assets on cheap deals while the Wizards have gone after veterans on big money with more miles on them. This isn’t building an exciting team that can also swing for the fences. It’s building a tolerable team that is just waiting to die. It’s a mix somewhere between the 2010 Bobcats and the 2012 Sixers.

There are any number of risks here, my biggest fears hidden in the idea that the rookie they draft this year doesn’t need heavy minutes. It’s true that rookies don’t play 40 minutes a night. There’s always room. But consider the situation. Michael Kidd-Gilchrist or Thomas Robinson would be entering into a situation where a coach who just made it out of the interim tag is coaching for his job, and has the option of playing a veteran who knows what he’s doing and knows how to win 30-35 minutes a night or splitting those minutes with a rookie who more than likely is going to need quite a bit of development. (If Bradley Beal falls to them, everything works out great and there are puppies and rainbows. This is a pretty likely scenario.).  In that case you’re risking limiting the kid’s confidence and hurting his development, all because you know that Trevor Ariza isn’t going to get completely lost chasing his guy off the backscreen or helping on the pick and roll recovery.

So that’s not a great scenario. But the Wizards feel like they need to win now. That they have to throw the fans a bone. And it’s true you have to get out of the cycle of losing and change the culture. But you do that by drafting quality players. I’m even fine with the Nene acquisition, that gives them the old guy to be a rock for this team. Throw in some low-minute veterans on affordable contracts.

But instead?

The Wizards are more than likely pleased that the contract for Okafor and Ariza expire just as John Wall is coming up for an extension. But consider that final year. Assuming neither player opts out (and  if they do, that’s actually worse, because now you’re already committed to the win now concept but just lost one of your valued veterans — Okafor has an Early Termination Option and Ariza a Player Option for 2013-2014), they’ll be going into that season with a 28-year-old Ariza, and a 31-year-old Okafor and Nene. If things go as planned, they won’t have a very good pick in the 2013 draft, because they’ll have improved enough to either escape the lottery or be at the very far reaches of it.

So you enter the final year of Ariza and Okafor’s deals trying to convince John Wall after having either made the playoffs and been vanquished in the first round under any conceivable matchup (does that team beat the Bulls without Derrick Rose, even?), or having won 35 games but barely missed the playoffs. You’re trying to convince John Wall to sign the extension (which he inevitably will, either during the season or in restricted free agency; guys don’t leave off their rookie years, just doesn’t happen). And so that’s when that team either has to sell out to try and make a big jump, or, if they haven’t really accomplished anything or if they get off to a bad start because of the way the team is constructed, they have to blow it up, tanking out.

So then that next year holds even more promise for a return to the high lottery as Nene turns 32 before the start of the season.

As long as you don’t trade them a player that makes them so considerably better that they improve to the point of avoiding that situation? You could wind up with quite the asset by obtaining a draft pick from Washington in either year.

These are a lot of ifs and contingencies. The Wizards could also flip Okafor with an ETO next year for a nice package or prospect. They could move some combination of players. John Wall could make the leap. But it shows you the danger of moving in this direction. The Wizards want to win now. But they need to be careful to make sure that they realize that if this thing starts to turn south, they need to bail for the friendly waters off Rebuild Island. The only sure way to develop into a respectable team long-term is through the lottery, to keep being terrible until you get the right combination of players to change things organically. The Wizards are trying to inject a techno-virus to change everything.

We’ll have to see if the patient survives the shock to the system.

Nene totally might have possibly gone to Houston if a trade that didn’t happen had happened. This is a thing, for some reason.

Nene nuggets

I’m begging you to let this story die. No one’s happy with how the first Chris Paul trade fell apart. The NBA shouldn’t have owned the team, so that it wouldn’t have been in a position to turn down the trade as the owner (not the league; to say otherwise is basically twisting reality and ignoring facts, which you can do but you’ll be wrong). Dell Demps should not have been put in a position to consider that he had autonomy only to have it yanked away. The Rockets and Lakers should not have been led to believe they were dealing with a sovereign entity when they were not, and David Stern should not have put himself in the position to have to act simultaneously as Commissioner and owner.

No one’s happy. The fans, the players, the media, the league, the management, anyone. Chris Paul’s fine with it, but he only wanted out. Once that happened it wasn’t his problem anymore.

But this thing has to die. It was three months ago, it was a trade that never happened, that shouldn’t have been agreed to by a rebuilding team anyway, and it wouldn’t have solved all the problems or really most of the problems of any of the three teams.

And yet.

The Houston Chronicle decided to ask Nene about how he was supposed to have signed with Houston had they gotten Pau Gasol in the deal, and Nene was (shocker) inconclusive with his approach.

Nuggets center Nene did not quite confirm the widespread conjecture that he would have signed with the Rockets as a free agent had the Rockets’ proposed trade for Pau Gasol been completed, opening cap room to sign Nene. He did come close, referring to Houston as “a better spot.”

“We had a great conversation,” Nene said. “Kevin McHale is a legend. It was a privilege for me to sit down with him, have a little time with him. I like the city. I signed with Denver. I love Denver, but I still like this city. I have friends here.”

Asked if he would have signed with the Rockets, Nene laughed and said: “I can’t answer that. People think it.”

Nene cited a variety of reasons for his fondness for Houston, not the least of which was a quality Houston has that few NBA cities can match; ample humidity.

“It’s like Brazil,” Nene said. “It’s humid, like tropical. Nice. I like the players that play here. I love Denver. All my career is right there. Friends. Family. I’m in a good spot. I could have been in a better spot, but I’m in a good spot right now.”

via Ultimate Rockets » Nuggets’ Nene shares his fondness for Houston.

Yeah, those NBA players definitely do make free agency decisions to give up significant money because of humidity. Happens all the time.


Look, they may have gotten Nene. It’s possible. They wouldn’t have been really all that much better because neither Gasol nor Nene are great rebounders, their defense would suffer and the skillsets are slightly redundant. (Check this out for more on that.) He could have signed with Denver anyway, because of the money and situation. There’s no way to know. But dragging up this trade over and over again in a vain hope of tearing down the league for something that’s over with and was the right decision regardless is insane. There are a lot of ways to make the Rockets a contender with that roster.

Nene and Gasol was a bandaid on a bullet hole.