Tag: NBA to Anaheim

David Stern

David Stern says ball in Sacramento’s court now

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Put up or shut up.

David Stern is too much the diplomat to put it like that, but it was the gist of his comments in a Monday conference call discussing the decision by the Maloof brothers not to seek relocation from Sacramento to Anaheim.

Couching everything in words of praise for Sacramento fans and their outpouring of support, and for Mayor Kevin Johnson’s plan and energy, Stern echoed what the Maloof brothers said earlier in the day — if there is not a stadium deal well along the road to done by next March 1, the Kings will be free to leave.

And that could be back to Anaheim: “I think that Anaheim is in the future of the NBA,” Stern said.

Sacramento, your move.

Stern added that as of right now nobody really knows how this new stadium will be financed. So, there’s that little detail. In an interview with reporters earlier in the day George Maloof sounded like they would not be putting up cash into any plan. Getting any public money will be nearly impossible.

The NBA is going to play fair — they are sending a team of nine people from the NBA offices to work “in every aspect” of the Kings business, including sponsorships, ticket sales and media relations.

The reason is likely to mend relationships, according to Tom Ziller of SB Nation’s Sactown Royalty. Right now, there is not a lot of trust or love between the Maloofs and the city they tried to ditch. Fans have questions about if the Maloofs have enough money to be viable NBA owners — Stern said they do — and their commitment to making this work. The Maloofs told Stern they would try. Even so the NBA sends in people to make sure this gets a fair shake.

Two other interesting comments from Stern.

One came when he asked what was different about Sacramento than Seattle, another failed mid-sized market that could not keep an NBA team.

Stern talked about “hostility” from the Seattle mayor and a lack of the state legislature to help out in any way. With Sacramento both the mayor and local state senator are leading the charge to keep the team.

“Night and day,” Stern said.

Secondly, he had to tie the collective bargaining agreement into the Kings plans.

Stern said that an agreement needs to be in place with the players that allows a market like Sacramento to be competitive. Which they were a decade ago under this basic economic agreement, but whatever, we get the idea. But his point about fairness ties back to revenue sharing as well — if the Kings are making $11 million a year on their local television deal and the Lakers near $200 million, then without revenue sharing (teams currently do not share local television dollars) then everything else basically will be moot.

CSN Report: Kings to stay in Sacramento

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Monday both the NBA and the Maloof brothers will announced that the Kings will remain in Sacramento for another season, CSN California reports.

A source close to the discussions tells Comcast SportsNet that the NBA has told the Maloofs to expect the Kings to stay in Sacramento next year.

The NBA is expected to put out a press release on Monday and the Maloofs will follow with a release of their own, but an NBA press conference is not expected. The source also said Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson is expected to hold a press conference on Monday.

Expect the Maloofs (the owners of the Kings) to come out at their press conference talking about how they love Sacramento and never wanted to leave, how they want to make it work. Nobody in Sacramento will buy it. That family has a lot of work to do to repair their reputation in Sacramento

The Maloofs had planned to move their team to Anaheim starting next season. They had negotiated a lease agreement for the Honda Center and set up a personal loan from billionaire Henry Samueli, who operates the center. Even plans for a television deal had been set up. It seemed a month ago that this move could not be stopped.

But in the end staying seemed to be only option the Maloof brothers had. After Johnson spoke to the NBA owners — the Board of Governors — and talked about $10 million in new sponsorships and plans for a new building starting to take shape, other owners sounded like they were willing to give Sacramento one more chance.

It became clear in the past week or so the Maloof brothers did not have the majority vote of owners that would be required to approve the move. There became more and more of a feeling that this move was about the Maloof families personal financial issues — the Palms cansino, like all of Las Vegas, has been hard hit by the economy, and the brothers have taken on a lot of debt — than it was about the team.

Sacramento gets one more year. But if efforts for a new stadium do not take huge leaps in the next year, if money is not lined up to build it, the Kings will be gone next summer.

But for now, the Kings stay.

Kings fans not going down without a fight to keep team

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The Kings move to Anaheim for next season is almost certain. There are details to be hammered out, approvals needed, but there is a lot of momentum.

But the fans of Sacramento are not giving up.

Through a twitter campaign — #herewebuild — started by local sports radio show host Carmichael Dave there are about half a million in pledges from local fans and businesses to keep the Kings in town and build a new stadium. That may be a drop in the bucket of money — the Kings are getting a $50 million loan from Anaheim and $25 million in refurbishments to the Honda Center — but that’s not what the movement was really about at its core.

Carmichael Dave spoke with Aaron Bruski at Rotoworld about the effort.

The goal was to fix the tenor of the conversation here locally in Sacramento, which was extremely negative, with the towel pretty much thrown in not just by our city council but by our mayor himself in many senses. A lot of negative publicity has turned over the last three, four, five days into positive publicity. We’ve been on the front page of the Sacramento Bee, we’ve been on every TV station here in town, numerous blogs, the New York Times, and with you guys – and instead of the focus being ‘the Kings are leaving, the Maloofs and the city council are fighting, and Sacramento’s going to be without a team in two weeks,’ it’s now turned to ‘well that still all may very well happen, but in the meantime the fans are speaking up and they’re putting their money where their mouths are and trying to make a difference.’

It’s a Hail Mary pass, it’s the bottom of the ninth, it’s the 15th round – whatever sports analogy you want to use. But we’re going down with a fight, which is a lot more different than things were going just a few days ago


Today there is a rally at City Hall as the HereWeBuild people try to shake up the powers that be and mayor Kevin Johnson (the former Suns player). That’s a step. Turning those steps into something concrete is the next goal.

Now we have all these pledges out there but its Monopoly money, it’s not real. It’s pledges, just like any telethon, but we haven’t cashed them – and that’s gotten us a lot of good PR. The next step is to turn that into actual dollars, so what I need, and my thing from the get-go, from day one, is that we won’t collect a dollar of pledges until we have assurances that all laws are being followed, that everybody is protected, and that the goals of the movement are spelled out ad nausea, and let’s face it – we’re realists here. We know that the odds are against this thing being successful, so there’s more than a decent chance that every penny is going to have to be returned. And if the people of Sacramento and the surrounding regions that are Kings fans, when they are losing their homes and losing their jobs, and they’re still willing to dig into their piggy banks and to donate whatever they can – I need to give them assurances.

It’s a bit of a lost cause, but those can be the most noble.

The people of Sacramento will not just role over, they are trying and fighting back. Whether the battle is lost or not. Which speaks to why these fans should not be losing their team in the first place.