Tag: NBA rules

David Stern

Quote of the day: David Stern, still plenty condescending


“Actually, many players have said, that’s great,’’ Stern said about the reaction he’s gotten so far. “Now we can make the game about basketball talent rather than acting talent.

“I think the players association has a different perspective. I guess they like acting. But we think we have the greatest athletes in the world playing at a very high pace and they should be rewarded for that great play and they shouldn’t cause the game to be decided on anything other than their basketball merits.’’

—That is David Stern talking the new NBA fines for flopping, via the Dallas Morning News. He is referring to the fact the players union has said it will file a grievence on the flopping fines issue.

Nice, overly-simplistic answer for a not that simple question. The union’s concern is that they were not negotiated with, not really heard on a new fine that impacts their players (the league said they did speak and that it is well within its rights to move forward with this). The union may want to discuss the appeal process, enforcement and more. And we all have questions about enforcement, including NBA owners.

Stern goes on to say the league may error on the side of caution in handing out fines for flopping. They kind of have to, judging things on video the next day. But how much will that help the perception the NBA is flop happy? It’s going to be fun the first time a passionate fan base — let’s say the Knicks — think they got screwed in a game on a flopping call and the league doesn’t come down with a fine.

NBA Players union to file grievance over new flopping rules

Josh Smith, Paul Pierce, flop

When asked, players generally have been supportive of the new NBA anti-flopping rules and fines that were announced by the league office on Wednesday. Because they all think they have been victimized by floppers (but would never do it themselves).

The players’ union, not so happy.

The union has filed a grievance with the league over the regulations, reports Howard Beck of the New York Times.

It’s not really a huge shock — the union’s job is to protect the players and their paychecks, and they see this as a threat. There are legit questions about an appeal process and why the league gets the power here.

Bottom line, David Stern had a competition committee that discussed rule changes and things that included flopping, then the owners voted on those changes, and this didn’t come out of that process. This came unilaterally out of the league. You can like the intent but the league did not follow traditional or mandated process.

Plus, if you think the Billy Hunter and the union are going to pass up an opportunity to tweak Stern, you have not been paying attention the past 18 months.

Here is the direct quote from the union’s release:

NBPA Executive Director Billy Hunter stated that, “The NBA is not permitted to unilaterally impose new economic discipline against the players without first bargaining with the union. We believe that any monetary penalty for an act of this type is inappropriate and without precedent in our sport or any other sport. We will bring appropriate legal action to challenge what is clearly a vague and arbitrary overreaction and overreach by the Commissioner’s office.”

But frankly, in the end this isn’t a bad set of rules for the union. For one, the union has to realize flopping rose to the forefront as an issue during the playoffs and the league needed to act. Flopping is and was damaging the league’s image. Second, the fines here are not that severe.

The union may have questions over how the rule will be enforced. We all do. Someone will argue that every close block/charge call was embellished and deserves a fine. The more likely outcome is only the most egregious calls lead to fines and the players will learn to walk that line.

While the union may not like them, the players seem to back the new regulations. Look what some Lakers told Sam Amick of Sports Illustrated at Wednesday’s practice.

“Shameless flopping is … a chump move,” Kobe Bryant said. “We’re familiar with it. Vlade kind of pioneered it in the playoff series against Shaq [as a member of the Kings in the early 2000s].

“I’d love to see it have an impact on the game itself,” Bryant said. “[In] international play, technical fouls are the penalty for it, you get free throws, get the ball back and that sort of thing. I like the rule, though….”

“Back in the 80s, they didn’t flop,” Metta World Peace said. “It’s very annoying … It’s not fair to the guys who have worked on their body all these years and got stronger. It’s not fair. Flopping is very stupid. It’s not even basketball. I don’t know who taught people how to flop. Just make the right call. It’s that simple.”

I can’t wait to read the quotes the first time a guy gets fined for this. Part of the league’s goal is to have the public fines be a deterrent (the fine itself is not way out of line, but the perception could change behavior).

This is just not going to play out smoothly, that may be the only sure thing about the flopping rule.

Should the NBA ban zone defenses? No.

Wade, Zone defense, mavericks

It was 10 years ago that the NBA started allowing a modified zone defense to be played in the NBA. It’s not a pure zone — you can’t park Dwight Howard in the paint, there’s a defensive three seconds — but more and more teams are using some form of match zones. The Mavericks may have been the heaviest users in the league last season.

Over at the Sun Sentinel, Ira Winderman suggests the league would be better if it did away with the zone.

While this might come off as a somewhat parochial quibble, isn’t the entire point of NBA play to feature the star players, to provide the best possible canvas for the likes of LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Kobe Bryant, Carmelo Anthony, Kevin Durant and other perimeter scorers to thrive with their athleticism? While zone defenses can mask individual defensive deficiencies, the NBA is as much an entertainment product as an athletic endeavor. As it is, the NBA still bans true 2-3 or 2-1-2 zones because the player in the middle of such alignments can go no more than 3 seconds without actively defending another player. In other words, the NBA still does not allow true zone defense. In that vein, returning to a truer man-on-man approach could enhance the game and open up scoring, creating a more visually appealing product.

I disagree with my man Ira, and that last sentence is the key — a lack of zones did not create a more visually appealing product.

What the rules then led to is a lot of isolation basketball, something we saw too much of through the 1990s. Because if you had to cover the Thunder man-to-man, and I were Scott Brooks, I’d run Druant and Russell Westbrook isolations all day long? It’s not pretty, but as a coach my job is to win. How you going to stop those two? Teams tried by figuring out ways to play a zone while looking man-to-man, but it just all was not fluid or fun to watch.

I like the added bit of a chess match a zone provides. I like what it does to the game. I don’t want a pure zone because watching Andrew Bynum camp out in the lane for 24 seconds is not fun either, but don’t do away with it all together.