Tag: NBA referee consipracy


Winderman: New NBA head of officials doesn’t mean change, technology does


Since the Tim Donaghy fiasco, we’ve had the NBA offer up a former referee and a retired two-star U.S. Army general to oversee officiating. Now, former NBA player Mike Bantom, a long-time NBA executive, takes over.

Granted, Ronnie Nunn (the former referee) and Ronald Johnson (the retired general), mostly remained in the background as officiating supervisors, with Johnson taking over shortly after the Donaghy gambling revelations.

But the greatest advances in officiating are not “people” issues. And that means the Bantom hire ultimately will not alter the landscape.

Where the NBA has made its greatest strides since Donaghy are the technological advances, extending replay to include out-of-bounds and flagrant-foul situations, now moving into the goaltending realm.

While there can be no guarantees that another rogue official doesn’t make his way into the pipeline, or turn rogue while in the system, the greater the amount of secondary oversight, the greatly diminished chances of a referee unduly influencing the outcome of a game.

Or even trying, knowing his whistle might not be the ultimate whistle.

For those concerned about the “fix being in” (yes, that is David Stern’s blood you hearing percolating at the very mention), what the NBA has done is largely eliminate the chance of a game’s “ultimate” call being influenced by a referee’s personal influence. The camera, the NBA hopes, doesn’t lie.

If anything, establishing a “replay official” on site would go even further to diminish concern about bias, perceived or otherwise. Instead of having the officials who make the calls review the calls, there instead could be a qualified, perhaps older, official, one not necessarily up to the rigors of full-court sprints, making the ultimate decision. Retired referee Steve Javie showed us the value of an outside officiating view during the NBA playoffs on ESPN and that experience certainly could be brought back into play, even with the knees no longer willing.

Mike Bantom likely will do just fine as an officiating administrator, just as Ronnie Nunn and Ronald Johnson did.

But officiating questions don’t start in the executive suite, they start on the court, with the whistle.

The best way to clean up that whistle, or, in fairness to the current officials, keep that whistle pure, is to layer enough at-the-moment oversight so such issues don’t fester.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at @IraHeatBeat.

Winderman: NBA should have replay official for playoffs

NBA Finals Game 3: Los Angeles Lakers v Boston Celtics

Before each playoff game, four referees enter their locker room. Only three emerge.

The fourth is in attendance in case of injury, a smart move by the league with so much at stake.

The greater issue, especially in light of some egregious officiating errors this postseason, is why not utilize that fourth pair of eyes?

No, not on the court. There’s already enough clutter there. But why not in the TV truck, where numerous angles are available both in real time and on replay. With almost every postseason game on network TV, the camerawork also is at playoff level.

We’re not talking about reviewing every call or even many of them.

But it would allow any replay situations to be handled faster and with a greater assortment of angles, and without coaches preening over shoulders or fans mucking up the process at the scorers’ table.

Beyond that, if there is an egregious error late in a game, and a coach is willing to burn a timeout (such would be the cost, similar to the NFL), then an instant second look in the TV truck would be possible, those same after-the-fact replays that offer such a striking indictment after the score is final.

Yes, it would only be for the postseason, because it is the only time four officials are present, by rule, in the building. But it’s not as if there isn’t precedent. The NHL changes its overtime rules for the Stanley Cup playoffs, playing overtime the right way. And the NFL now has different overtime rules for its postseason.

Plus, by forcing coaches to keep a timeout in their pockets, it might lead to fewer stoppages along the way.

The NBA has strict standards of what can be reviewed and what can’t.

But the playoffs mean more, which means individual plays mean more.

This isn’t about nitpicking about block-charge. But what if the referee in the TV truck can get a definitive angle that shows the defender in the restricted area on a bang-bang final-seconds play?

To some, the argument is that it would leave much of the process to be determined by the quality of the television production.

As it is, TV dominates the process anyway, be it with the scheduling, the added timeouts, the lengths of the games.

Simply put, the NBA has decided that an extra referee at playoff games is not a luxury, but rather a necessity.

So should be getting the calls right, especially with the added means to do so.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/IraHeatBeat.

Sorry conspiracy theorists, one former NBA referee says stars don't get enough calls


reThumbnail image for Barnes_ref.jpgNBA referee conspiracy theories rank right up there with JFK, Area 51 and Tupac is alive in American mythology.

It’s an almost unquestioned belief that NBA superstars get the calls. Kobe Bryant and LeBron James get calls when they drive that Caron Butler or Jonny Flynn would not. Particularly late in games or during the playoffs. It’s probably why the Lakers won the last two titles, right?

Not even close, said former NBA official Ronnie Nunn, as told to the Toronto Star.

“The reverse is true, and that’s something the fans don’t know. To be perfectly honest, star players get fewer calls than they deserve. They probably deserve more calls,” said Ronnie Nunn, a retired NBA ref who now works as the director of development of NBA officials. “(Star players) play through contact that would make one believe the contact wasn’t significant enough for a foul. And then you look at it on tape and you see, ‘Wow, he really got bumped on that play, but he swirled around it and he made it look easy.’ And so, the no-call was incorrect.”

You know who gets the calls in the NBA? The aggressor. Almost every time. If you see a free throw disparity in a game, it’s not because a referee favored Miami over Atlanta, it’s because the Heat got the ball inside, because their players attacked the rim while the Hawks settled for jumpers.

But that’s not as much fun as saying the refs were trying to decided the game. And that Tupac was there, too, in section 114. I swear.