Tag: NBA Players Association


David Stern’s NBA deadline passes… and they are still talking


David Stern threw down an ultimatum last Saturday night (early Sunday morning, actually) — accept our deal by 5 p.m. Wednesday or we are going to replace it with a deal so bad for players we might as well cancel the season. Okay, he didn’t say anything about canceling the season, but he might as well have.

Well the deadline has come and gone…. and nothing.

The owners and players are still negotiating in New York through the deadline. They had met for more than four hours Wednesday as of this writing.  The reality is the deadline was artificial anyway, so long as the sides are talking and making some progress they will keep going at it. Consider it the Alan Jackson/Jimmy Buffett theory — It’s 5 O’ clock Somewhere.

If the talks blow up again maybe Stern will pull the current offer and put off the rollback offer out there, but for now nothing.

For now, we wait.

The players rejected the owners offer as is saying they would consider a 50/50 basketball related income split so long as the owners gave more on system issues such as the mid-level exception and luxury tax issues. Stern can make some tweaks to the offer, but not big ones.

We sit and wait to see if that is enough.

Report: Stern has authority to “tweak” owners’ offer

David Stern, Adam Silver
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Apparently there is some wiggle room. It’s not going to be much, the question is will it be enough?

Tuesday the players rejected the owners take-it-or-leave it offer saying they wanted more talks and some changes on system issues.

NBA Commissioner David Stern can make some minor tweaks to the owners offer, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo.

“There can be a few things tweaked along the edges, the periphery and this can be agreed upon,” one ownership source told Yahoo! Sports. “I’m confident that would not be an issue if [Stern] did that.”

“It will be a very slight budge,” one high-ranking management source said.

The players have come down to a 50/50 revenue split if they get the system they want, kicking back more per season than the $300 million the owners claim to have lost last year. But as a trade-off, the players want more freedom of movement and a system more like what the league has had for more than a decade. Small market owners — your hardliners — have been pushing for a system that would rein in big-spending teams.

They are going to sit down and they are going to talk. We’ll see if it’s enough, or if it is Armageddon.

Winderman: Shorter CBA length could be key to labor deal

NBA Labor Basketball

The owners insist they only grudgingly are offering this deal that comes with an expiration hour.

The players are saying they are willing to work with the proposed revenue split, as long as a few remaining system issues are addressed.

In other words, neither side finds the currently proposal in place particularly palatable.

So why not do what the rest of the country, or for that matter, the world is doing at this stage, live through the tough times with hopes of better days ahead?

The NBA lockout solution from this precinct:

A shorter deal, one where the two sides can see how the proposed terms work, but one in which players who have one more contract in them still might yet get to experience greater riches.

This started with a 10-year proposal by the NBA. Then we got down to the six-, seven-year range.

The league, of course, wants terms locked in before securing new broadcast riches.

But look at it from the other side, from the owners who are crying poverty. With a shorter deal, they would be able to judge whether the terms meet their revenue needs, or, frankly, whether even more is needed. (Or whether they should get out.)

Similarly, from a union standpoint, a shorter deal would afford the players time for the next time around, but not too far down the line, to better prepare for potential decertification, be in a position to spring it at the expiration of the next collective-bargaining agreement, instead of four months into the process.

The reality is that with so many star players locked into long-term deals, the Big Three with the Heat, Carmelo and Amare with the Knicks, even Kobe and Gasol with the Lakers, this competitive-balance thing isn’t going to change overnight, anyway.

But with a shorter CBA, the owners (and union) can see if the new work rules would take the league in that direction of greater balance without corrupting television ratings.

Beyond that, since the rookie scale calls for a four-year lock-in, this year’s rookie class, one not even eligible to vote on a new CBA, would not be locked long-term into the potentially onerous provisions of the current proposal.

For weeks now, David Stern and Billy Hunter have stressed it is time to get back to work, to make a deal.

By shortening the length of a proposed new CBA, the two sides could find it more palatable to do just that.

The hard-line owners? They never will be happy. That’s what Stern is there for.

The decertification-minded agents? They certainly will grouse about four or five years of uncertainty. Enter Hunter.

This lockout has been neither short nor sweet.

But a shorter CBA length could remove some of the sour taste for all involved.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/IraHeatBeat.

NBA owners, players to meet Wednesday afternoon

NBA & NBA Players Association Announce New CBA

You knew — or at least hoped — the two sides would sit down one more time and talk before David Stern’s self-imposed deadline.

We’ll see if it does any good, but the two sides will meet around 1 p.m. Eastern in New York according to multiple reports (ESPN’s Chris Broussard broke it).

The league is working on getting some owners to fly in for the meeting, according to Marc Spears at Yahoo.

Heading into the meeting the owners have put an ultimatum on the table, a take-it-or-leave-it offer that Tuesday the players said they would leave. The players want a few more tweaks to the system side and they would meet the owners at a 50/50 split of revenues (which is not really 50/50 because the owners take $600 million plus off the top, but we’ll let that go for now).

The ball is in the owners’ court. They can give a little more on system issues and allow a little more player movement and room for teams that want to spend to spend, or they can scuttle these talks and try their rollback offer that will almost certainly cost the entire season if they stick to it. It’s time to make a deal.

We’ll see if it happens, but at least they are talking.

Okay owners, time for you to give a little and make the deal

Mark Cuban, David Stern

It’s really this simple:

If the players have come to 50/50 in terms of a basketball related income split, this is all on the owners. If negotiations fail Wednesday it is on ownership. If there is no season blame Michael Jordan not Derrick Rose. Blame Robert Sarver not Steve Nash. Blame Dan Gilbert not LeBron James.

The owners claim to have lost $300 million last season. If the players come to 50/50 — as they implied they would after their meeting on Tuesday — then that is about $300 million in last season’s dollars and about $3.3 billion in a 10-year deal. They have covered the losses. The players have given up cold hard cash out of their pockets to make the league profitable for the owners.

What do the players want — to keep some freedom of movement so they can work where they want. Which is something we all can relate to. In a free country we should be able to sacrifice money to work in better conditions and live where we want if we so choose. That’s capitalism at work. Freedom of choices.

Howard Beck of the New York Times put the owner’s situation well in a late night tweet Tuesday.

Is it worth losing season over whether taxpaying teams get to do sign-and-trades and have full midlevel exceptions?

That’s what it has come down to — system issues. Frankly, minor ones. There have been five teams paying the luxury tax who have done sign-and-trades to bring in a player in the last six years, and one of those was the Knicks getting Eddy Curry. Is that what you are going to lose a season over? Are the owners going to lose a season over whether the Lakers can go out and get Steve Blake one year? Really?

Yes there are luxury tax and escrow issues, but those are solvable.

It was much earlier in the process when we posted about “the ultimate game” — an economic theory that people will reject a deal that favors them if they think it is unfair. That’s how the players feel right now. So they stand and fight. The owners have to give the players a way to save face, they have to give a little so the union can sell this as a win. Do that and this ends.

That means agreeing to a meeting. That means telling the hardliners they have gotten enough and to shut up (we’re looking at you MJ). It’s time to really negotiate, make a deal and end this.

Not that it’s going to happen. The owners are wildly unpredictable right now. They might not even meet with the players. But that’s what should happen.

It’s time to make a deal.