Tag: NBA owners

Dave Andreychuk

Another NHL player warns NBA counterparts it’s not worth it

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The NBA players have chosen their path. It’s a hard path they see as being based on their principles, it’s about fairness and the future

But they are not the first to walk this path — the NHL did it before. The league lost a full season. And now a second NHL players has come out and warned NBA players it’s not worth it.

Long-time NHL veteran Dave Andreychuk spoke to the Orlando Sentinel about it (hat tip Eye on Basketball).

“If players think it’s better to sit out the season, let me tell (you), it’s not. It’s just not,” Andreychuk says. “In the end, it will be worse….

“The deal got worse by us sitting out,” Andreychuk admits. “At the end, we were so willing to sign, we had to agree to what the owners wanted. We gave back a tremendous amount just to get a deal done so we could go back to work….

“All of the momentum and excitement surrounding the franchise after we won the Stanley Cup was lost,” Andreychuk says (he was captain of the Lightning team that won right before lockout). “Fans who bought tickets and jumped on the bandwagon during the playoffs never came back because the next season was cancelled.”

Bill Guerin, as hardline an NHL union guy as there was during the lockout, also has warned NBA players not to lose a season. You can say that former pro athletes should support the current generation, but these guys are speaking from the heart about how it went for them.

Yes, the NBA lockout is different in a lot of ways. It’s also the same in a lot of ways. You don’t have to heed what NHL guys tell you, but you should listen.

In the meeting Monday when the players voted to dissolve the union, Kobe Bryant reportedly told the team reps that if they went this path it couldn’t be halfway. All in, long haul. Because if the players cave now — like a lot of owners think they will — the price they pay will be very severe. Just ask the NHL guys.

Billy Hunter thinks maybe players could form their own league

NBPA Meet To Discuss Current CBA Offer

After watching (and at times attending) the summer of pro/ams and charity games, I’ve become more convinced than ever that the players need the NBA, too. They need the marketing, the building, the ability to create a professional event — the league builds the stage the players are on. Their relationship is symbiotic.

Throughout the lockout there has been talk that the players should just form their own league. Wednesday night Billy Hunter, director of the players union trade association, jumped on board during an event where he was speaking with NFLPA head DeMaurice Smith.

Author and MSNBC guy Toure was there and tweeted out quotes (hat tip to SLAM, who helped put Hunter’s quotes this into a cohesive form).

“Maybe we can start our own league. There are faculties where we can do that. Can’t play at MSG but can play at St John’s.” … There’s talk of getting a TV deal and creating a new league but it’d have to be with a network that’s unafraid to cross the NBA.”

“The owners are scared of LeBron style movement and want to keep players wedded to franchises … The players’ decision to blow up the union was unanimous. They were high-fiving, sayin let’s get it on!”

“The season is not yet on life support. There’s still time to put on an abbreviated season.”

As we’ve covered today, I agree that the owners want to squash LeBron James style player movement. That’s part of why we are here.

But the players do not have the money to start their own league and there is nobody who can build a stage for their talents like the NBA can. Are television networks not going to cross David Stern and the NBA? Yes, but only because they question the viability of said league and product they would get for their troubles. We’ve seen the summer leagues and their lack of defense, is that what it looks like? Entertaining for a night, but not sustainable for a league.

The players need the owners and the NBA. The owners need the players. Which is what makes this sad. Let’s hope Hunter is right and the season is not on life support, although it’s certainly not looking too good right now.

First real tests of new labor deal will be Howard, Paul, Williams

Deron Williams, Avery Johnson, Billy King

Chris Bosh is right. Part of what is fueling this hardline stance by owners is about Miami and New York. This is what I mean.

What LeBron James, Chris Bosh and Carmelo Anthony did last year shook small market owners to their core. Those guys pay the bills for owners, yet franchise cornerstones moved on because they didn’t like what Cleveland and Denver had built around them. Owners want to be able to keep their stars (but make it easier to move role players around them) and the last offer from David Stern and the owners was built to do that.

Which makes Dwight Howard, Deron Williams and Chris Paul — next summer’s big free agents — the real test cases for owners.

If Williams decides to leave the Nets next summer, and the latest offer from the owners had been the approved, it would have cost him $25 million, according to Nets Daily.

Whether there’s a season or not, if the Nets re-sign Williams to a new contract this summer, he will be owed roughly $101 million over five years. But if he opts out of his $17.7 million final year and signs with a new team, he’ll get $76 million over four. That’s $25 million.

How so? The owners’ final proposal (much of which the players agreed to) permits teams who hold “Bird Rights” on their own players to re-sign them to five-year deals with 6.5% increase. That drops to four years with 3.5% increases for new teams.

He’s right. But a lot of that was in place for LeBron and Bosh and it didn’t matter.

Cleveland could offer one more year (a sixth, Miami could only offer five) and bigger raises to LeBron, which meant their offer in total was about $30 million more guaranteed than anyone else. And LeBron still left and actually took less than max money to get out of Cleveland (they did a shotgun sign-and-trade that let LeBron and Bosh get a sixth year, but both were gone either way). It may be harder for teams to create cap space under the new system, but teams will do it — how many teams contorted themselves to make room for LeBron? Miami stripped their roster down to two players to make their move.

It’s hard for any team to keep stars. Kobe Bryant almost left the Lakers in 2004, and that’s a destination team. Tim Duncan is an exception to the rule and there were still temptations for him to leave San Antonio, but they had built a team around him that could win rings. Elite players are going to be well compensated, so even if a team can offer more money it will be about the secondary factors — is this a team that can win a title? Do I want to live here?

That’s where New York and Miami and a handful of other cities will always have an advantage. And while the small market owners may have better financial footing under any new labor deal, they will still struggle to keep their stars if the organization is not well run. It’s always going to be that way. Sorry.

But we’ll see what the Nets, Magic and Hornets are able to do with the new rules. Whenever we get them.

Bosh calls lockout league’s revenge for Miami, New York

Image (1) bosh_wade_james-thumb-250x166-15665-thumb-250x166-15666.jpg for post 3600

Chris Bosh thinks that part of the owners’ motivation in playing hardball is their anger about what LeBron James and he did last summer, then what Carmelo Anthony did to Denver. Bosh believes those moves are fuel for smaller market owners trying to get a complete and total destruction of the union during the current negotiations.

Bosh is right.

The Miami Heat forward talked about it with our man Ira Winderman of the Sun Sentinel.

Bosh said it would not be a stretch to believe the Heat’s signing of himself, LeBron James and Dwyane Wade in the 2010 offseason contributed to the league’s belief that the work rules had to change.

“I think so,” he said….

“I mean, if you look at the free agents coming up in the same situations, with Chris Paul, Dwight Howard, Deron Williams, they can control their own fate,” he said. “They have the power to control that and I think that’s a great thing. In any job you want freedom to negotiate.

“With us doing what we did, and Carmelo going to the Knicks, I think that has a lot to do with it. Hopefully we can keep that and guys can come and go and make the deal that’s best for them and their family.”

Last summer, and watching what ‘Melo did to Denver, the hearts of the small market owners hardened. They saw themselves in that position and didn’t want it to happen ever again (Utah tried to avoid it by trading Deron Williams before he could hold the hostage).

Know this — there are owners who want to break the union, make the players miss paychecks and watch them cave. Getting in a season in did not matter. Only a complete and total victory mattered.

Bosh is right. What LeBron, Bosh an ‘Melo did is part of the reason we do not have basketball in mid November (and beyond). The question is really should they be allowed to choose where they work?

NBA owners to have strategy conference call Thursday

David Stern

After more than two years of negotiating against the NBA players’ union, the owners will get together on a conference call Thursday,  according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo, and map out a strategy now that the union has dissolved.

Wojnarowski also explains the union’s new position.

Antitrust attorney David Boies, who is leading the players’ suit, wants the owners to negotiate a new labor deal through him.

We are here because the owners got the players to agree to a 12 percent salary rollback — enough money to cover the owners’ stated losses — plus some system concessions, but that was not enough. Rather than offering the players an olive branch and a way to save face so we could have basketball, the owners went for the jugular. There was no give, no way out for the players to claim even a partial win at the end.

So instead the players reached for the biggest club they could find and blew up the negotiations. The players pushed the button, but the owners are far from blameless (really, they are more so).

Thing is, the players’ new strategy is not going to work short term. There is no way the owners will be more likely to give in now. The players have challenged them to a legal battle and the owners do not want to look like that strategy worked and it scared them back into negotiations. The owners are going to stay strong for a while.

Eventually there will be negotiations. Whether those talks happen fast enough to save the season — or even who is in the room — is impossible to say, but there will be negotiations. I hope the owners talk about that, too. They need to talk about how to save the season, not just how to win.