Tag: NBA owners

NBA And Players Representatives Meet To Discuss Possible Settlement

NBA league offices, union to meet Friday to seal deal

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For once, there is no reason to dread the NBA owners and players getting together for a negotiation.

Friday in New York the two sides will sit down to hammer out the details remaining on a labor deal that is expected to be finished and presented to both the owners and players for separate votes next Thursday, reports Marc Stein at ESPN. If approved as expected by those votes, training camps would open the next day, Dec. 9.

The now reconstituted union and league have a lot of “B-list” issues to hammer out, such as details on drug testing, D-League assigments and the authority of David Stern to discipline players, among a host of other smaller issues. None of these are considered deal breakers and both sides will horse trade a little on these to get a deal done. That said, it’s a long list and could be a long day.

Maybe the biggest issue is NBA draft age, but that is not one that will be resolved Friday. This year’s draft will remain as-is (meaning age 19 and up, allowing for one-and-dones) and it likely will be that way for a couple years. The two sides will form a committee to study how to deal with it going forward. The owners would like it to be higher, the players say it should be age 18, and a host of options will be considered including one where guys can enter the draft but if they are not chosen they have to spend two or three years in college. Smart money says when all is said and done it remains at age 19.

The good news is there is almost no chance that Billy Hunter storms out of the room and the two sides hold separate press conferences to say the deal is off. The issues are not worth it any more, they figured out the money and other big ones. But don’t worry, the lawyers are still getting paid a lot of money for the next week or so to finalize this (I know you were concerned about them).

Video: Talking rookie of the year with Chris Sheridan

Derrick Williams
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Chris Sheridan of Sheridanhoops.com and I were on NBC SportsTalk (6 p.m. Eastern every day on Versus, but I don’t need to tell you that) and the twitter question of the day was about Rookie of the Year. Personally, I’m putting my money on Derrick Williams (an athlete who can finish running the floor next to Ricky Rubio) but Sheridan had an interesting response that might interest Knicks fans.

Also, below we talk and debate the CBA a little, who won and who lost, plus some of the effects of it. Which are a tad hard to predict right now.

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Billy Hunter outlines labor deal, steps remaining in memo

NBPA Meet To Discuss Current CBA Offer
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You have questions… but mostly they revolve around finding a way for your favorite team to trade for Dwight Howard or maybe Rajon Rondo.

NBA players have questions about the new NBA Collective Bargaining Agreement, too. Theirs mostly revolve around, “When can we get back to work and get paid? And how much are we going to get paid?”

Billy Hunter tried to explain both the deal and the process to the players in a memo obtained by Sam Amick of Sports Illustrated.

As for the timing, first the players have to vote to reform the union (remember the union formally dissolved to make way for the antitrust lawsuits against the league). That process should have started Tuesday, Hunter says in the memo. Once that happens the details of the CBA will be hammered out between the two sides.

Hunter says the players will get to vote on the new CBA next week. With training camps and free agency set to open next Thursday, you can bet that gets done early in the week.

Then Hunter gets around to explaining the money.

Over the course of the 10-year agreement, collective player salaries and benefits will increase from $2.17 billion in 2010-11 to more than $3 billion by the end of the deal. If revenues exceed modest growth, we expect that collective player salaries will likely grow to over $3.5 billion. The average player salary will approach $8 million by the end of the deal.

Although players will not receive 57% of BRI as under the 2005 CBA, collective player salaries should experience the same annual salary growth as the last deal.… Nonetheless, thanks to the enormous success projected for the NBA, league revenues should grow so high that our collective annual salary increases will favorably compare to the increases we received under the 2005 CBA. On average, under the last deal, the players received annual collective salary increases of $70 million per season. Under the new agreement… the players will receive collective annual increases averaging at least $85 million each year over the term of the 10-year agreement. Beginning in 2012-13, we expect that collective salaries will increase by more than $100 million per season.

Hunter goes on to explain the challenges of the increased luxury tax but how they were able to maintain some flexibility for teams to spend who are paying the tax. The goal was to allow more player movement despite the tax, he said.

Go read the deal. Not all the players will like it and the memo is certainly Hunter selling it to his constituents. But at the end of the day they are not going to get a better offer and it’s not worth losing more pay to fight over the scraps.