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Cavaliers center Semih Erden has surgery on thumb

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Quick an update on an injury we told you about previously.

Cavaliers center Semih Erden has now had surgery on the thumb he broke in a game this week for Turkish side Besiktas, reports Sportando on twitter. He will be out at least six weeks with the injury.

That means if a settlement to the NBA lockout comes Cleveland may be without its big man for at least part of training camp and maybe into the start of the season.

The injury came in the same Besiktas game where Deron Williams dropped 50 points. With Erden out Besiktas has stepped up efforts to get another big man and reached out to a number of players including Lamar Odom and Marcin Gortat.

Report: NBA owners, players have opened negotiations again

NBA & NBA Players Association Announce New CBA

Everybody wanted to see the NBA owners and players open up negotiations again — if there is any hope of NBA games on Christmas a deal is going to be need to be reached by the start of next week. Whether a judge ordered it or if someone just picked up the phone, it didn’t matter.

And they are talking again, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo. Here are his tweets.

NBA and players resumed talks on Tuesday to try and end the lockout before the cancellation of Christmas games, two sources told Y! Sports.

Talks were expected to continue today, sources said, and one league source tells Y!: “We should know more by later this evening.”

Derek Fisher isn’t a part of the talks now, sources say.

Technically these are “settlement negotiations” to end the players’ anti-trust lawsuits, so the talks are between the league and the attorneys for the players, as well as Billy Hunter (part of the NBA’s legal team). Fisher is currently president of a trade union not authorized to negotiate a collective bargaining agreement, so he has no seat at the table.

How the negotiations go may depend on what the sides see as the starting point. If the owners are still using the last offer David Stern made to the players — a 50/50 split of revenues and a soft cap with a stiff luxury tax — the sides may not be far apart. If Stern is at his “reset” offer of 47/53 revenue split with basically a hard cap, they are doomed. What’s more, union officials have suggested their best offer may have come off the table as well. We’ll see.

But at least they are talking. We are back to that.

Politicians grandstanding on NBA lockout starts Wednesday


It was only a matter of time before a politician somewhere (we like to imagine in a smoke-filled backroom) said “how can I gain some points with my constituents around the NBA lockout?”

Meet New York State Senator Malcolm A. Smith — who represents a rather gerrymandered looking district that includes parts of Hollis, Queens and more — who is putting up a petition in front of Madison Square Garden (not in his district) tomorrow for season ticket holders to sign and ask for a full refund of their full season ticket money. He’s bringing restaurant and bar owners losing money due to the lockout together to complain, too. (He should reach out to the guys running escort services, while he’s at it.)

Grandstanding. Look it up in the dictionary and this is exactly the definition.

People who renewed season seats and didn’t see this potential don’t get my pity. It was a risk, they renewed anyway. But they can now get their money back from the teams on games lost to date, or they can leave it with the team gaining interest that can be applied to future season seats. Which is what most are doing.

If you really want to have some fun, do this in front of the NBA league offices. Or the union offices. Both are in New York (again, outside Smith’s district). Why MSG?

Yes, we’re all ticked right now. But this is about as helpful as challenging Michael Jordan to a game of one-on-one to end the lockout.

Artest challenges Jordan to one-on-one game to end lockout

Los Angeles Lakers' Metta World Peace, formerly known as Ron Artest, holds a news conference in Los Angeles, California

At this point, just about any way you can think of to end the lockout is good with me.

So if it’s a game of one-on-one to 21 between and owner and a player, I’m good with that.

Which is exactly what Metta World Peace — the baller formerly known as Ron Artest — proposed on twitter, targeting the one owner who has played the game at the highest level.


In this hypothetical, I’ll take Jordan. World Peace would win an even game to 21 (just an age thing) but Jordan would score about 10, he still practices with the Bobcats and can play a little. If World Peace spots him 20, well, Jordan’s going to enjoy those Cheetos.

Now, if World Peace challenges Michael Heisley to a game….

Report: NBA owners, players reach out to 1999 dealmaker


You don’t know who Jim Quinn is, but he might be the one guy who can save an NBA season.

He’s done it before.

For two decades Quinn sat in Billy Hunter’s seat as director of the players union (well, Hunter’s old seat, there is no union any more, just a trade association since the “disclaimer of interest”). But he is a guy that the key players on both sides know and trust.

And he’s the guy who helped broker the deal the last time the NBA found itself losing games to a lockout, in the 1998-99 season.

Both sides have reached out to Quinn in recent days, reports Ken Berger at CBSSports.com.

Reached by CBSSports.com Tuesday at the offices of Weil, Gotshal & Manges, where he is a partner and chairman of the global litigation team, Quinn confirmed he has spoken with both Stern and NBPA director Billy Hunter since the collective bargaining process broke down and the union disclaimed — leading to multiple antitrust lawsuits.

Quinn characterized the conversations as “touchy-feely” and “off-the-record,” and said they have occurred “in the past number of days….

“I’ve always said that I’ll be helpful in any way I can be,” Quinn said. “Everyone would like to see that there is a season, so sure, I’d be helpful.”

Both owners and players have talked about the desire to make a deal — everyone gets the urgency. Everyone wants basketball back. And there is a sense that someone else needs to be in the room to get a deal done — federal mediator George Cohen seemed to move the sides somewhat toward some middle ground, but could not get them close enough in the end.

Maybe Quinn can be that guy. Maybe it will be another mediator. But a reasoned voice from the outside that guides the talks.

As a source close to the talks told ProBasketballTalk, there is growing pressure on both sides to make a deal. They are running out of time and a lost season would mean $2 billion in lost salaries to the players and about that much in lost revenue for the owners (under much more favorable labor terms). They realize the momentum the league built up is slipping away, and to allow the players case to slide toward summary judgment carries big risks for both sides.

Nobody wants that. Everyone would love to see NBA basketball on Christmas, but since it takes about 30 days from a handshake deal to the first games, so there isn’t much time. That is only going to happen if someone like Quinn can broker a deal. Fast. And even that may not be enough.