Tag: NBA lockout

NBA Commissioner Stern speaks to reporters in New York

Conflicting reports on what owners want: Deal or ultimatum?


Lots of rumors flying around about the NBA negotiations over the last 24 hours and what the owners exactly will push for — there has always been a divide among ownership on what exactly they want, and that gulf seems to be widening.

Whether that gulf is wide enough to kill efforts to get a deal this weekend and have NBA games on Christmas remains to be seen. The sides will resume talks Friday to resolve the lawsuit (which is akin to having a handshake deal in place).

On one hand, we have a report from Marc Stein of ESPN that some owners are pushing hard to get a deal done.

Sources identified Miami, Orlando, Phoenix, Boston and the Los Angeles Lakers as the teams pushing hardest behind the scenes for a deal in principle by the end of the weekend to ensure that a “representative” season can be staged. And at least three teams that requested anonymity, according to interviews conducted Wednesday by ESPN.com, are highly optimistic that the framework of a deal can be struck by Monday.

Phoenix is interesting — Robert Sarver was once seen as one of the real hardline owners. Boston’s Wyc Grousbeck also had been in the hardline camp before but seems to think the owners have gotten enough and need to make a deal now.

On the other end of the scale…

David Stern is going to improve the owners’ offer to players but is going to tell them “take this or I cancel the entire season,” ESPN’s Ric Bucher reported on SportsCenter Wednesday night.

Another ultimatum. Not again.

My guess is that Bucher’s source is from the camp of a hardline owner. Stern can’t really be thinking ultimatum again, that would be just the worst negotiating tactic ever — “Hey, this failed twice, but let’s do it again.” Stern is not going to do that and risk a court thinking he is not negotiating in good faith.

Plus, Stern is not about to be the bad guy who cancels the season — he has been the master in this negotiation of making the players the bad guy, he’s not about to slip up now. The season as a whole will not be canceled before Jan. 1, and I was told by one source it’s more like Jan. 20.

That said, Buchcer’s source shows that the hardline owners are not going to just roll over to have games on Christmas.

There seems to be a real momentum toward a deal right now — a handshake deal this weekend that lets us open the NBA season as a Christmas present. Let’s hope the hardline owners (and players) don’t screw that up.

Report: Brook Lopez to join Deron Williams in Turkey

New Jersey Nets v Atlanta Hawks

It looks like Turkish side Besiktas has found its NBA big man — and it turns out to be Deron Williams’ teammate.

Brook Lopez is near a deal with the Istanbul-based team to join them for the remainder of the lockout, reports Kartal Basketball )via Sportando). The deal is in place and just needs to be finalized, according to the report.

Brook’s brother Robin — the Suns center — would join him there, but just as a practice player, according to Sportando.

Brook is D-Will’s teammate with the Nets and them developing some on-court chemistry can only be good for the team and help the odds of the Nets re-signing Williams so he can lead the team into Brooklyn.

Besiktas had reached out to a variety of NBA big men — Dwight Howard, Carlos Boozer, Luol Deng, Lamar Odom — before landing Lopez. This is the same side that had Allen Iverson last season and made a run at Kobe Bryant.

Lopez does have an NBA out in his deal, so he will be back with New Jersey when the lockout ends. So with any luck, this will be one of the shortest trips to Istanbul ever.

If season cancelled, Magic would owe Orlando $2.8 million


Yes, there are some owners willing to miss the season to crush the union.

But there also are motivations for other owners to get a deal done.

Take the Orlando Magic, for instance. While they would love tools in the new deal to make it more likely they can keep Dwight Howard, they also have some motivations to make sure there is a season — $2.8 million reasons, according to the Orlando Sentinel.

City government officials emphasize that the Magic are obligated to pay the city $2.8 million even if the entire season is canceled, so the city has some degree of protection from the effects of work stoppage, especially as it incurs some expenses in running the building.

“It was one of our lead negotiating points in the contract when we did the negotiations with the Magic,” the executive director of the city’s venues, Allen Johnson, told me in September. “We never anticipated a [lockout]. We never wanted one.”

The city would get more revenue if there are games, but that’s a nice little insurance policy for a municipality that, like every other city in the nation, is facing fiscal challenges.

But it also would be a challenge for the Magic ownership, which will have no revenue coming in but will have to cut checks to cities, sponsors, ticket holders and more. They will be writing checks they don’t want to write. And nobody will be happy.

Better to settle now and be playing by Christmas.

NBA talks picked up where last ones left off… but progress?

NBA Labor Basketball

The first thought when I heard the NBA owners and players were talking again and had been since Tuesday? Good. They can’t reach a deal without talking. And the fact there have been fewer media leaks out of these talks than any previous is a good sign.

The second thought? What are the starting points for the two sides? Where they left off or did they pull back at all?

We don’t know how the talks went — Yahoo reports there was little progress — but we know the two sides met for two days and, after taking the Thanksgiving holiday off, will resume on Friday. If the goal is to save Christmas Day games (kicking off a 66-game season) they will have to have the framework of a deal in place by early next week.

But we do know the answer to the second question — the two sides pretty much picked up where they left off, according to Howard Beck of the New York Times.

The parties essentially picked up where they left off Nov. 10, discussing a proposal that includes a 50-50 split of revenue, shorter contracts and tougher spending restrictions. The players rejected that deal, but on the basis of a half-dozen mechanical issues which, in the grander scheme, are fairly minor. They have already conditionally agreed to the 50-50 split and most of the new payroll restrictions.

Neither side has tried to put any new issues on the table, or backed away from previously negotiated points, according to those informed on the talks. That gives the parties hope that a deal not only can be achieved, but can be consummated quickly.

“Both sides could fairly say that it’s crazy to blow the deal up over these remaining issues,” one person close to the talks said Wednesday.

Well, the sides have been fairly crazy up to now, so….

If, as reported, David Stern polled the owners to see if they would allow a full mid-level exceptions for all teams (even those over the luxury tax) it is a sign the sides are serious and trying to make a deal.

Whether they can or not remains to be seen.

Labor talks focused on mid-level exception, 66-game season

NBA basketball

As PBT and other outlets have already reported, the attorneys for the NBA owners and players are talking Wednesday.

The goal — to reach a deal in the next few days, one that can have the NBA starting games on Christmas Day. That’s the day seen as the NBA’s second opening day by many around the league, the day of the first games on national broadcast television when more casual fans start to really notice the league. It’s a day of marquee matchups — the scheduled ones this season were Boston at New York, Miami at Dallas (a finals rematch) and finally Chicago at the Los Angeles Lakers.

However, this week’s talks are a little different than previous ones — were always a lot of attorneys in the negotiating room, but now they are the ones driving the bus. The question becomes are they able to drive it to a deal?

Here are three update notes out of the talks.

First, David Stern is canvasing owners to see if he can offer the full mid-level exception to all teams regardless of where they are on the luxury tax scale, reports Marc Stein of ESPN.

The MLE was a sticking point in the last talks. The players want higher spending teams — the taxpayers such as the Lakers and Mavericks — to have the ability to spend the MLE to bring in role players to go around their stars. The owners did not want that — the hardliners want to rein in the spending of the bigger market teams and saw this as a way. The owners proposal called for a mini mid-level of $3 million that could not be used every year.

The second note is that if a deal can be struck this weekend and games would start Christmas day, there would be a 66-game season, according to Howard Beck of the New York Times.

That would be a more condensed schedule than the 50-game one of the 1999 season, which saw back-to-back-to back games for teams. Teams will get tired and worn down in that schedule.

Third, and finally, remember that this is not a labor negotiation any longer. It is a bit of semantics, but this is now a lawsuit settlement conference, the sides are talking about the terms to settle the NBA players’ antitrust lawsuits against the league.

Bottom line, if the attorneys can find a compromise on the key issues — division of revenues, structure for the salary cap and exceptions, etc… — then the union will be reformed (and the lawsuits dropped), the “B list” issues (draft age restrictions, drug testing, and the like) will be hammered out and the deal will be voted on by both sides. Games would start in a month.

For the fan, the function is the same, these are negotiations. But the language is different. It’s a bunch of lawyers.