Tag: NBA lockout

Atlanta Hawks v Chicago Bulls - Game Two

2011-2012 NBA schedule details leak: It’s a brick… house


Details have begun to emerge regarding the 2011-2012 NBA season, and we won’t complain because we’re getting a season and at this point they could play them in zero gravity  in a tar pit and we’d be happy. But just so you know, you need to prepare yourself for a pretty ugly season overall. Details courtesy of Howard Beck of the New York Times:

  • Season starts December 25th, ends April 26th. That’s about two weeks later than usual, and it means there will only be one day off from the end of the regular season before the playoffs begin on Saturday, April 28th, presumably. That’s not a huge bump in games, 3.9 games up from 3.5 per week, according to Beck.
  • What’s the only thing worse than a SEGABABA (second game of a back to back) (via Pounding The Rock)? A THIRGABABA. Third game of a back-to-back-to-back. Each team will have at least one, and up to three back-to-back-to-back sets, three games in three nights. Surprisingly, Zach Lowe of SI.com did research on this from 99 and found that teams didn’t really lose significantly more often on those games. It’ll be interesting to see the effect it has on subsequent games, however, as well as total fatigue.
  • Teams are looking at 48 games in conference, 18 games out of conference. So teams will not visit all 29 other cities during the season. Whoever doesn’t get the Lakers will miss out on a solid night of revenue. Same for whoever misses out on Miami.
  • Maybe most gross? Each playoff team will have a back-to-back in the second round. that will speed up the playoffs which people tend to complain about, but the quality of games also suffer.

So you’ve got players out of shape coming into a shortened schedule, playing three times in three nights and then back at it on limited rest.

Hope you guys like rebounds.

Kevin Martin heads to the gym (and other lockout reactions)

Kevin Love Visits FOX Business
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Just like NBA fans, NBA players were shocked and excited early Saturday morning. (No, not like that. What is wrong with you people?)

When a bleary-eyed David Stern and Billy Hunter sat side-by-side in a NYC conference room about 3:30 Saturday morning to announce a deal, the NBA players who were up got the news and sounded like guys ready to go back to work.

Rockets guard Kevin Martin had a good line in talking with Sam Amick at Sports Illustrated — and a great reaction to the news.

“I had to turn on the NBA channel and then I realized that what [former Sacramento head coach] Reggie Theus said about nothing good happening after 2 a.m. wasn’t so true after all,” said Martin, the eight-year veteran who publicly called for an end to the lockout in early November. “I was just happy that there was a breakthrough and that we have a chance to do what we love to do.”

So naturally, he did just that — almost immediately. An hour later, Martin, who wasn’t about to go back to sleep, was working out in his favorite local gym.

Most NBA players took to twitter to express their joy.

There is this tweet from Kyrie Irving, the No. 1 overall pick set to start his career with the Cleveland Cavaliers.

“The journey now begins!!”

And then there are these three tweets from Kevin Durant, Kevin Love and Hassan Whiteside.




Great, we have a handshake deal. So now what happens?

NBA Labor Basketball

David Stern and Billy Hunter shook hands. Figuratively, but there is a handshake deal in place for an NBA labor settlement. The framework for a full blown new NBA collective bargaining agreement is in place.

But that is a long way from an actual signed deal and NBA games starting on Christmas Day.

So, what happens next?

First, the negotiations never stop. Stern and Hunter may get to sleep in for a day but the attorneys for the two sides will be meeting long hours over the next week to 10 days to hammer out the “B-List” issues. Those are things like the draft age, the drug testing program, who can be assigned to the D-League and a host of other issues that need to be resolved. The two sides don’t always agree on those things, but none are deal breakers. They horse-trade these items for a while.

Meanwhile, the players will ask to have their anti-trust lawsuit in Minnesota dismissed and the owners will ask to have their preemptive lawsuit in New York on decertification issues dismissed as well.

Not long after, the NBA players union will be reformed. Just as it was before. As if nothing had happened.

Eventually the deal will be finalized and put to separate votes of the players and the owners. In both cases the vote will not be unanimous, there are hardliners on both sides that think their side gave up too much. But in both cases a majority want games and can live with this deal, and barring some dramatic turn it will pass.

Right after that, team facilities will re-open to players and coaches can contact their charges and start talking about the season.

Then training camps will open on Dec. 9, the same day that maybe the most wild and frenzied free agency period in NBA history will open. The talent on the market this year is not what it was in years past, but teams will move fast to get their free agents in place and into camp working with their new teammates.

Then on Christmas Day — tip off.

And while this season promises to be a roller coaster, it will be much more fun than the ups and downs of the lockout.