Tag: NBA lockout


Expect just two preseason games per team in shortened camp


I will warn you now — those marquee Christmas Day NBA opening day games are going to be sloppy.

Same with the likely dozen games to follow the next day and a lot of the games over the next month or so.

Teams are going to have a 16-day training camp and just two preseason games, reports John Schuhmann at NBA.com. The dates and games are not yet know, but if you are wondering who your team will play in those couple exhibition games, pull out a map and see what teams are nearest and you pretty much have your answer.

Early on expect veteran teams that have not seen a lot of turnover — Spurs, Celtics — to get off to fast starts because they should be smoother early. However, how the legs of those veteran teams will hold up as a condensed schedule drags on for months remains to be seen.

We’re just saying, it’s not going to be a year for a lot of pretty basketball, and that will start on opening day.

Monday morning one liners: Coming, going from Europe

CBA 11/12 First Round: Guangdong Hongyuan v Zhejiang Chouzhou
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With the end of the NBA lockout, NBA players are exiting Europe and heading back to the good ol’ US of A for an NBA season. What players are on the move are the highlights of our morning one liners.

If you read one thing today, make it this very thoughtful look at where the NBA will be in six years and how the fast-changing style of media consumption by you fans could impact the league and the new labor deal, written by friend-of-this-blog Kevin Arnovitz

Despite all kinds of rumors there were handshake deals under the table, so far Chinese teams do not look like they are going to release J.R. Smith, Wilson Chandler and others.

Know this about the new NBA 66-game schedule — it’s not good for quality NBA play. But it will maximize revenue for the owners and players. Again, it’s all about the money, not the game.

Tony Parker and Ronny Turiaf have played their last game for ASVEL in France and are on their way back to the USA. In his last game there, Parker had 23 points and 8 assists, he has looked good.

Wizards draft pick and dunk machine Jan Vesely has arranged a buyout agreement with his team, Partizan Belgrade.

Leandro Barbosa is on his way back to the USA soon, but he doesn’t sound happy about it. The Brazilian was playing in his home country and was pumped to have Christmas with his family. Not going to happen now.

While a lot of players are pumped to be coming back for an NBA season, Chris Douglas-Roberts is not, he’s staying in Italy (he was an NBA free agent who did not ask for an opt-out).

Rudy Fernandez tweaked his knee with Real Madrid and will be out about a week. That will not impact his return to the Dallas Mavericks for training camp. Or him telling Dallas he wants to go back to Spain.

This is the second report suggesting Tyreke Evans looks like he put on weight during the lockout. We will see when camps open.

Here’s a great breakdown of where every team is in relation to the salary cap and what kind of moves they can make starting Dec. 9 when free agency opens.

More rumors that John Wall didn’t play in the Donte Green charity game because of a groin injury. Not sure if it’s true, but those are slow to heal and need rest when they happen.

The Knicks and Nets may make a run at Jamal Crawford, but smart money has him staying with the Hawks.

In a shock to almost nobody, the Bulls will not bring back Janero Pargo.

Lakers, Mavericks, other big spenders safe for two years

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Part of the reason we lost 480 NBA games this season is because a bunch of owners were pissed at the Lakers, Mavericks, Heat, Celtics and other owners willing to spend over the luxury tax. Small market owners wanted to tie the hands of the big spenders in the name of the mythical “competitive balance.”

They got their wish… but not right away.

The most punitive measures for big spending teams don’t kick in until year three of this labor deal, reports Ken Berger at CBSSports.com. So spend away, Buss family, you’ve got a couple more seasons before a bill comes due.

Luxury tax rates: The same dollar-for-dollar as in the previous CBA for the first two years. Starting in Year 3, the rates increase to $1.50 for the first $5 million over; $1.75 for $5-$10 million over; $2.50 for $10-$15 million over; $3.25 for $15-$25 million over; and an additional 50 cents for each additional $5 million (same as previous proposal).

Repeater Tax: A dollar-for-dollar additional tax for teams that are above the tax line for a fourth time in five years (same as previous proposal).

That means the tax is the same for two seasons and the repeater tax can’t hit a team until 2015 at the earliest. These are delayed bills that give today’s big spenders a chance to reduce salary — except they are all are already in a pretty good spot in a couple years.

To use the Lakers as an example, they currently have only $61 million on the books by the time the higher taxes kick in ($30 million of that goes to Kobe Bryant and $19.2 million to Pau Gasol). The Lakers will have time to bring their payroll to whatever level they deem reasonable (which will still be over the tax, just likely not in the $90 million range anymore).

Even the Heat, with their current big three and others roster, are at $71 million for the season the tax rates jump. They, too, will spend more but have time to prepare. That or ship Chris Bosh out.

In the short term none of these teams will not have as large a mid-level exception as others, but that is about the only new restriction on them for now. For the next couple years, it’s business as usual for the spenders.