Tag: NBA lockout


Report: If no deal by end of Friday, things could get really ugly


NBA owners and players are back at it, more than four hours into a Thursday meeting (as of this writing) following a 12-hour session on Wednesday.

Wednesday was the deadline day of David Stern’s “reset” offer — one that would almost certainly kill the season if the owners really stuck with it — but he said after the talks ended Wednesday that due to progress “we’ve stopped the clock

It may start again Friday, reports the USA Today.

Progress must continue to be made Thursday so that the sides can end by saying they are confident of being able to bring an offer to the respective memberships — owners and players — by close of business Friday, said a person familiar with negotiations who requested anonymity because he was not authorized to go public.

If that does not happen, Stern will announce the owners’ offer has dropped to the 53-47 split and a hard salary cap — and that likely would trigger a domino effect that could end any chance for a season.

Some players and agents are sitting on the sideline right now with the signatures to start the process to decertify the union. If Stern goes to his reset offer, the players will start to try to decertify.

Through all that, the players will do their best JFK impression and ignore Stern’s new offer and deadline and keep negotiating. We’ll see then how the owners react to that.

But it comes down to this — if there is not a handshake deal by the end of business Friday things are going to get very ugly. Much worse than they have been. And they haven’t been good.

Is the NBA lockout illegal in Canada? Maybe…


I have a better chance of explaining string theory to you than I do the intricacies of Canadian labor law.

But TrueHoop today pointed us toward a fascinating post from a Canadian law blog talking about the NBA lockout.

It is possible the NBA lockout — while certainly legal here in the United States — may be illegal in Ontario, the province of Canada where the Toronto Raptors play (often poorly, but they play). Which could get interesting.

Consider this case from 1995 involving the lockout of NBA referees–the NBA loves the lockout! This was before the Raptors’ had a franchise, but the NBA played regular exhibition games in Toronto. The Ontario Labour Relations Board ruled that the NBA had not complied with Ontario laws governing when a lockout is lawful. Since the NBA was employing workers in Ontario during the exhibition games, it was not entitled to lockout them out without first complying with Ontario laws. Therefore, the lockout of referees, although legal in America, was illegal in Ontario. A similar ruling was made in regards to the lockout of major league umpires also in 1995–the lockout was legal in the U.S., but umpires could not be locked out for Blue Jay home games.

There are several steps that need to be satisfied for a lockout to be legal in Canada and the blog believes that most of them have not been satisfied.

So what if the lockout is illegal, you ask? Well, if the players union or Raptors players wanted to be a pebble in the shoe of the league there is a remedy.

In theory, once the Raptors’ lose a pay cheque due to an unlawful lockout, they could seek a remedy from the OLRB, were the Board to rule that the Raptors cannot be locked out.

Not likely to happen, wouldn’t really matter if it did. But interesting.

Rick Barry thinks the players should fold, Hunter is disaster


This is why Rick Barry did not get the job as president of the National Basketball Players Association.

The Hall of Fame player and legendary Warrior thinks the players are basically powerless, need to fold and take the deal the owners offered. Really, he thinks the players should have taken the painful deal the owners offered months ago.

He is not alone, remember former No. 1 pick and Showtime Laker Mychal Thompson told us something similar. Here is exactly what Barry told KNBR in San Francisco, via Sports Radio Interviews.

“If I was still a player today I would be totally ticked off by the fact that we didn’t make a deal months ago. I really do believe that this could’ve been resolved and should’ve been resolved a long time ago. Why they always have to come down to this I don’t know. I’m not a big fan of Billy Hunter. I think Billy Hunter is one of the worst things that happened to the NBA. Yes he got them an unbelievable deal last time but he also was responsible for the lockout in the late 90’s which cost the players 1/3 of their salaries basically and got nothing for it. The same thing is happening here. What they’re doing is they’re making a situation which is a bad situation worse by standing firm. Standing firm for what? You’re standing firm to get nothing. All you’re trying to do is minimize the losses that you have to accept in order for there to be a deal put in place. The owners have made it perfectly clear they can’t survive with the way the deal was last time. I keep reading these statements ‘well we’re not going to give back what we fought so hard to get.’ Well what you got was more than you should’ve gotten. Accept it, lick your wounds, make a deal, take a little bit of a reduction.”

A lot of fans feel the same way, especially seeing a season teetering on the brink.

But the players don’t see it that way, and frankly if Barry were a player he would not either. Hunter and the system in place were good for the players and the league — the NBA has been its most popular when stars have dominated. See the Bulls and Jordan as example number one. And few players want to get rid of a guy who helped them make more money.

Although Barry is not thinking like a player. He’s thinking like Barry.

First victim of NBA amnesty clause? Mike Miller’s house

Heat's Miller reacts after sinking a three point basket against the Mavericks during Game 1 of the NBA Finals basketball series in Miami

There are still questions about what the NBA labor deal will finally look like, but you can be sure that an amnesty clause will be part of it. Teams will get the chance to release one player and wipe his contract off their books (the player will still get paid).

The Miami Heat are likely to send Mike Miller and the remaining four years, $24 million (not to mention two surgically repaired hands) packing.

So Miller has started packing. Nothing is official, not the labor deal or who the Heat might use an amnesty clause on, but Miller is selling his house, reports the Sun Sentinel (via Ball Don’t Lie).

The veteran forward said Wednesday he is just taking stock of the current situation in both his career and the NBA. And that means taking stock of his 9,968-square-foot estate with the $180,000 in annual property taxes.

“It’s a couple of things,” Miller said. “Just preparing myself; never know what can happen.”

Miller’s is exactly the kind of deals owners want to get out of more easily. This was a good deal when it was signed — Miller is the kind of floor-spacing shooter the Heat need but he also can rebound and is a solid all-around player. He should have meshed well with the Heat.

But injuries (one serious to his hand in the preseason) robbed him of that chance and there are real questions about how he bounces back. He was there for most of the playoffs but hit just 29 percent from three and 34 percent overall. It’s not worth the $24 million risk for the Heat.

So if you want a nice home in the Miami area — and have $9 million burning a hole in your pocket — we have a suggestion.

Talking one-and-done with guys who did it

Rose Calipari Memphis
Leave a comment

Part of the NBA labor talks — the part they are going to get to after they figure out the money and system stuff that have taken 133 days and are still not solved — is discussing the NBA’s age limit.

The players are not huge fans. The owners are very committed and many would rather see it at two years before you can come to the NBA, not just one. More time in college means teams get a better idea who they are drafting (fewer mistakes, they’d like to think) and they like the process of colleges generating stars that people will then try to follow in the NBA.

But what do the guys that did it think about it?

ESPN the Magazine did a great article talking to all the one-and-done guys from the last few years to get their thoughts. Go read the whole thing. But here are a few highlights.

Derrick Rose (Bulls, Memphis): “The biggest adjustment was to the NBA lifestyle — paying bills, taking care of my family, the women coming at you. I’m just being honest. I was 19. I’m glad I had BJ [Armstrong] to prepare me for all that. On the court it was knowing all the play calls, knowing how to talk to your teammates, learning to play through your mistakes. I was lucky — I was allowed to do that. Other people who came out with me didn’t have the same opportunity and it took them a lot longer to get comfortable.”

DeAndre Jordan (Clippers, Texas A&M): “When I first got my apartment I was 19 and I just sat in there alone and was like ‘Who am I gonna hang out with?’ In college, the guys you hang out with are your age and they don’t really have anything to do after practice besides homework and just stay at the apartment, so I had to get used to staying at home by myself and picking up new hobbies. In the NBA, once practice is over everyone goes their separate ways because some people have families, some people have other issues going on, wives, girlfriends and things like that so you can’t hang out with them as much as you hang with your college buddies.”

B.J. Mullins (Thunder, Ohio State): Myself, growing up in homeless shelters and 15 different houses, 15 elementary/middle schools, if I see a kid that has a talent like that, I’ll tell him to go. If I see a rich, suburb kid, why does he have to go straight to the NBA if he already has money? Get your education, enjoy life.”

Kevin Love (Timberwolves, UCLA): “Like with all aspects of life, something that potential one-and-done players should definitely look out for is people in your life that are Yes Men. Ask yourself, who are the people that are challenging you? Who’s giving you a different perspective? Who is challenging you and making you think about the things that you do? Listen to those people. It makes you look at things differently. That’s only going to help your decision-making.”

DeMarcus Cousins (Kings, Kentucky): In a way, it’s good because a kid needs that college experience — to go through those changes and being closer to being an adult and learn that responsibility at the college level. At the same time, I don’t believe the rule should be put in place because it’s predicting somebody else’s life — you should be able to make your own path because you never know what that person’s situation may be at home or with their family.