Tag: NBA lockout

David Beckham at Lakers

Even David Beckham is ticked about NBA lockout


That’s it. Even past-their-prime-but-can’t-retire guys from England are ticked about the NBA lockout. That’s when you know it’s gone too far.

David Beckham, a court side seat regular at Staples Center for Lakers games, is angry about the lockout. Becks (I can call him that, we’re tight) was on ESPN radio in Los Angeles and said this (hat tip to our man Beto Duran).

“As a fan, its’ killing me because I love the game and I love watching these athletes, I think they’re such great athletes. It’s killing me because I love the spectacle of going to the Lakers and watching the guys play.”

The spectacle of going to the Lakers. That really sums it up for so many of the people close to the floor at Lakers games. Spectacle. (There are real, passionate Lakers fans in LA, they just have to sit above the luxury boxes in the 300s. It’s a law.)

Hopefully this sadness will not dull Beckham’s senses when he and the Galaxy try to win the MLS Cup on Sunday.

Actually, I shouldn’t mock Becks. At this point I’d take the spectacle of a Lakers game, really any game, just to get the NBA back.

Bosh calls lockout league’s revenge for Miami, New York

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Chris Bosh thinks that part of the owners’ motivation in playing hardball is their anger about what LeBron James and he did last summer, then what Carmelo Anthony did to Denver. Bosh believes those moves are fuel for smaller market owners trying to get a complete and total destruction of the union during the current negotiations.

Bosh is right.

The Miami Heat forward talked about it with our man Ira Winderman of the Sun Sentinel.

Bosh said it would not be a stretch to believe the Heat’s signing of himself, LeBron James and Dwyane Wade in the 2010 offseason contributed to the league’s belief that the work rules had to change.

“I think so,” he said….

“I mean, if you look at the free agents coming up in the same situations, with Chris Paul, Dwight Howard, Deron Williams, they can control their own fate,” he said. “They have the power to control that and I think that’s a great thing. In any job you want freedom to negotiate.

“With us doing what we did, and Carmelo going to the Knicks, I think that has a lot to do with it. Hopefully we can keep that and guys can come and go and make the deal that’s best for them and their family.”

Last summer, and watching what ‘Melo did to Denver, the hearts of the small market owners hardened. They saw themselves in that position and didn’t want it to happen ever again (Utah tried to avoid it by trading Deron Williams before he could hold the hostage).

Know this — there are owners who want to break the union, make the players miss paychecks and watch them cave. Getting in a season in did not matter. Only a complete and total victory mattered.

Bosh is right. What LeBron, Bosh an ‘Melo did is part of the reason we do not have basketball in mid November (and beyond). The question is really should they be allowed to choose where they work?

One man’s suggestions we like to stop future lockouts

Padlock Arena AP

This lockout is painful. Like any smart creatures — and I’m talking about we the fans, not the players and owners — we want to avoid suffering the same pain in the future.

Meaning once this lockout ends, what steps can be put in place to make sure next CBA negotiations, whether it is six or 10 years from now, gets done with more urgency?

Our man A. Sherrod Blakely had a couple ideas over at CSNNE.com.

First step:

Every day after July 1 that the CBA passes without there being at least an agreement in principle, the league will pay $500,000 to a predetermined group of charities – chosen by the players, but not their own charities – in every NBA city…. (the players union will) have to pony up $250,000 for every day – it doesn’t make sense that the guys who get the checks are punished the same as the guys who cut them, does it? – and those will go to a predetermined group of charities – chosen by the owners – in every NBA community as well.

And for every month moving forward, the owners will have to pay another $250,000 (i.e., on August 1, $750,000 per day, September 1, $1,000,000 per day, etc.) while the players will see their daily total increase by another $125,000 per day (i.e. on August 1, $375,000 per day, September 1, $500,000 per day, etc.)

The idea here is pretty simple — these two sides didn’t really start to negotiate until they felt a financial pinch (and even that has not been enough). So, move the financial pain up in the calendar.

Second step:

After July 1, a federal mediator should be injected into the talks because at that point, it’s clear that both sides can’t and probably won’t strike a deal even with the threat of having to cut checks because they can’t stick to a damn deadline, and…

It works for me. I would prefer to have owners not going for every penny and players willing to die on issues that only impact a handful of players, but I’m not trusting human nature here in the future. I trust Blakely more.