Tag: NBA lockout

Los Angeles Lakers Fisher speaks at a news conference alongside Executive Director of the NBA player's association Hunter in New York

Where things stand as Kobe, stars show up for union meeting

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The NBA players union meeting — one that could end up helping decide the fate of the NBA season — is going on as of 9 a.m. Monday morning in New York.

Here’s where things stand as the meeting starts:

• Kobe Bryant, Carmelo Anthony, Russell Westbrook and a number of NBA stars and players — not just official team representatives — have shown up for this meeting. Which is going to make for an interesting dynamic. Kobe reportedly wants to accept the 50/50 deal out there, while others like Etan Thomas are opposed to the plan. The loudest voices will carry the day in a crowded room like that.

• Other non-team rep players in attendance are Emeka Okafor, Jeff Green, Elton Brand, Andre Iguodla, Evan Turner and the prince himself Luc Richard Mbah a Moute.

• Chris Duhon, the team rep for the Orlando Magic, said his team would vote to accept the deal and put David Stern’s offer to a vote of the players. Note that Duhon was one of the players who was slamming the deal on twitter, but clearly he heard from teammates who felt differently.

• Out of respect for this meeting, the agents and players planning to try and decertify the union — they say they have the necessary 130 signatures (more like 200) to file to start the process — will not file those papers Monday. However, Tuesday is a real possibility.

• Contraction is not dead and the players union has concerns about it, specifically that if the owners do it there could be changes in the BRI split that would hit players in the pocketbook.

• Smart money still says the players vote to modify the owners offer and approve that, throwing the ball back in the owners court. They are not buying another do-or-die deadline from David Stern. But that is a risk.

Winderman: League tells you how to build “Roster of the Future”

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Six

If you didn’t know better (or perhaps if you do), it sure seems as if David Stern’s ultimate goal from the lockout is to reshape his league through some sort of real-life fantasy draft.

Getting beyond Sunday’s Twitter theatrics (we personally believe the answers were provided by some sort of auto-reply-bot or Adam Silver, which might actually be one in the same), perhaps the league’s YouTube slide show spelled it all out.

There, on the final slide, in effect, was the NBA “roster of the future” (our quote marks).

How do you build a roster that conforms to the NBA’s proposal and avoid all the draconian measures of the proposed next luxury tax?

According to the NBA, with:

One “Superstar (max salary)”: $17 million.
One “All-Star”: $14 million.
One “Starter”: $10 million.
Two “Starters”: $8 million (apiece).
One “6th Man”: $5 million.
One “Rotation Player”: $4 million.
One “Rotation Player”: $3 million.
One “Rotation Player”: $2 million.
One “Rotation Player”: $1 million.
Five “Remaining Players”: $3 million (total, $600,000 average, essentially minimum scale).

Go ahead, try to fit any recent championship model into such an alignment.

Taken further, and allowing for NBA-level salary inflation, try to fit the Showtime Lakers, any version of the championship Celtics, or even Michael Jordan’s Bulls into such a model.

And we won’t even get into the current Big Three Heat or Big Three Celtics.

It’s almost as if Stern (which could happen through decertification, at least according to Sunday’s threat), wants to reset the entire landscape, through the aforementioned fantasy-style draft.

The league designates 30 “superstars” (as if there are 30), and each team selects one.

The league then designates 30 leftover “All-Stars” (even  though with 30 “superstars” would any All-Stars be left?), and each team selects one.

From there, a pool of $10 million starters is set, and so on.

We’re not talking parity here; we’re talking a completely new world order.

For months now, the whispers have been about how Stern and the owners were attempting to blow up the league.

Perhaps they are.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/IraHeatBeat.

Video: Top 10 plays from Josh Howard’s Dallas charity game

Kevin Durant
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Another week, another round of charity game highlights featuring Kevin Durant and friends.

Josh Howard hosted a charity game in Dallas and the fans were treated to some high flying plays and displays of athleticism. As is a charity game tradition, they were not treated to any defense. Still, this is what we have for basketball highlights right now, so enjoy.

In the next 48 hours or so we’ll have a lot better idea if you’ll be seeing NBA highlights this year, or just more of these.

Thanks to BallisLife for the video.

Powerpoint version of league’s offer players will soon reject

David Stern

This Powerpoint presentation above is the latest in the NBA’s PR blitz that included the odd, stiff answers of Adam Silver on twitter, releasing their full proposal to the USA Today and David Stern talking to media outlets. The league is getting its message out there and letting everyone know exactly what their offer is.

And by everyone we mean the rank and file players. That is who this really is aimed at, the league is hoping enough players see this and think it’s fair that they will pressure the union leadership to put the offer to a vote. A vote it very well might pass.

That’s not what is going to happen. The union is expected to make the smart negotiating play — modify the parts of the offer they don’t like, vote to approve the altered offer and throw it back in the owner’s court.

The players have done better of late winning the public relations battle of the lockout. It’s a hollow victory. It’s reached the point with most fans where it feels there is no right side, no winners, just a lot of losers willing to hurt the game for their pocketbooks.

NBA takes to Twitter to… well, we’re not sure why


The NBA announced on Sunday night they would take questions from people on Twitter and David Stern and Adam Silver would answer them. What followed was a series of refutations from players and repetition of talking points they’ve been spewing for months. It was neither productive, insightful, nor revealing. It did not harness the power of social media, and only served to push the one-sided agenda they’ve been pursuant to for months.

So, no, it didn’t go great.

And that was it.
It was a noble idea. Reach the fans directly, communicate the league’s position, leverage social media. It just came across as more baseless rhetoric, more noise in a white sea of context-less nonsense. The league could have elaborated more on the specifics of the deal, shown how it isn’t as bad as the players have made it out to be. Instead they just said “No, it’s not!” and that was all.
The rhetoric continues as tomorrow’s doomsday clock ticks shorter.