Tag: NBA labor deal

NBA And Players Representatives Meet To Discuss Possible Settlement

Labor deal details getting done, vote set for Thursday

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It was expected to happen, but don’t confuse that with being easy.

Lawyers and officials with the NBA owners and players union put in nearly 28 hours over the weekend to hammer out all the B-list issues that were remaining undone with the NBA labor deal, a source told ProBasketballTalk. It’s sort of the dirty work that needs to get done but not everyone notices (much like dirty work on the court itself).

The important thing is that everything will be in place for both the owners and players to vote on the deal Thursday (electronically, in both cases), allowing training camps to open Friday.

Ken Berger of CBSSports.com has an update on where those secondary issues stand.

Lawyers for the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association have pared the list of outstanding items to about 50, down from about 250 when the process began Friday, the person said. Among the more important B-list issues, it remains likely that the age limit for draft eligibility will be unchanged and is expected to be revisited at a later date when there is time for more thorough discussion. The two sides also are still negotiating the language on a new drug-testing policy and a provision by which teams will be able to shuttle players back and forth to the NBA Development League.

The two sides will set up a committee that will take another look at the draft age limit, but it will be a year or two before there are any changes there. Do expect more liberal rules on players getting sent down to the D-League earlier in their career.

But for now, the dirty work is getting done so we can have hoops on Christmas.

Video: Darren Rovell, David Falk talk labor deal numbers

NBPA Meet To Discuss Current CBA Offer
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CNBC’s sports business expert Darren Rovell gives a great synopsis of the NBA’s labor deal and how it effects players and player movement.

Then he brings in agent David Falk — and shockingly, agents don’t like this deal. Falk lays out his case for why pretty well, like most agents he wants a more pure free market system where the top players can make more. (Falk, by the way, represents Elton Brand, Corey Maggette, Evan Turner and used to represent some guy named Michael Jordan.)

Heat, Knicks may be big winners in last minute deal changes

NBA Finals Heat Mavericks Basketball

Part of the motivation for the hardline owners during the NBA lockout was to never let what happened with LeBron James going to Miami to ever happen again. To never let what Carmelo Anthony did to the Nuggets ever happen again (they lost the ‘Melo part of the fight). Small market owners didn’t like players banding together to go to a better market and win together and they couldn’t stop it.

Except, in the system concessions made in the last 48 hours the Heat and Knicks may be the biggest winners.

The way the rules are set up those two teams are in good position to bring in mid-level players and some depth to put around their stars that could put them over the top.

Brian Windhorst broke down the Heat case at ESPN.

The biggest move was owners allowing teams that are not more than $4 million over the luxury tax line to use the full mid-level exception of $5 million, according to multiple reports. That $4 million window makes a world of difference for the Heat and should allow them to:

• Use the entire $5 million mid-level exception in free agency without having to use the amnesty clause on Mike Miller to waive him and get his contract off the books.

• Use the entire mid-level exception on a free agent and still be able re-sign restricted free agent Mario Chalmers and rookie point guard Norris Cole.

Mike Miller could still be let go by the Heat, but if they think he could contribute they no longer have to get rid of him to clear the way for others. It will depend on his recovery from thumb and knee injuries. But they have $67 million on the books and options now.

The Knicks have $7 million less on the books for next season than the Heat, meaning they can bring in a mid-level player to go around Anthony and Amare Stoudemire plus use a second exception to get a guy. They can use the $14.2 million deal of Chauncey Billups (in its last year) as the base for an offer to try and get Chris Paul or Dwight Howard and if it works they still might be able to get a mid-level player again next season.

Even teams like the Lakers and Mavericks — teams with owners willing to spend and in a “win now” mode due to a core that only has a few more years in their championship window — also may benefit in the short term. It will cost them more in tax, but they can go get a mid-level exception guy, the kind of role players they need around their stars.

Over time, the goal of this labor deal will be to flatten out the payroll disparity in the league — teams have to spend up to $49 million next season and $90 million payroll will be almost impossible due to the tax structure. (One should not confuse that with parity or competitive balance, the owners like to tell you those things go hand-in-hand but they do not.)

But in the short term two teams who need good role players to go around their stars may have been the biggest winners in the last 48 hours.

Video: David Stern, Billy Hunter talk NBA labor deal

NBA And Players Representatives Meet To Discuss Possible Settlement
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In case you were not one of us up at 3 a.m. (Eastern, there are advantages to my West Coast perch some days) here is the video of David Stern and Billy Hunter talking about the tentative NBA labor deal early Saturday morning when it was announced.

Both are lawyers and both choose their words carefully here, but know that they will get this deal passed — the only thing more damaging to the NBA than that lockout would be to have a deal to start games on Christmas fall through and for the lockout to start up again. This will get approved, not unanimously on either side, but approved.

What does a 72-game season look like? Packed like sardines.

Empty Amway Arena

Here’s the real hook for players with a season that starts Dec. 15 — they lose essentially only one paycheck.

Their salaries in a shortened season are pro-rated by games played, a 72 game season would mean 10 fewer games than normal (a 12 percent loss). That is basically a little more than one missed paycheck total for players over the course of a season. Money is the bait to tempt players to take the offer. (Teams would only lose five home games of revenue.)

For fans, what 72 games would mean is one crowded season — which is not good for quality of play. Teams normally play 15 games a month (give or take a couple), and the season would start six weeks late. So most teams would have played about 22 games by Dec. 15.

To miss only 10 games means one very condensed schedule — basically the pace of the 1999 50-game season (the last time there was a lockout) just spread over another month and a half. John Schuhmann breaks it down a little more at NBA.com.

As we laid it out last week, a 72-game schedule allows every team to play in every arena at least once. Each team would play the 15 teams in the other conference two times and the 14 teams in their own conference three times….

But if the players approve this deal, get ready for a schedule with very little time for practice or recovery from aches and pains.

What we saw in 1999 was guys who got tired and it showed more on the defensive end. Basically, things got sloppy. This is a longer version of that so expect more guys missing games with minor injuries, and expect some stretches of play where coaches will want to burn the tape (if they still used tape).

But that’s the offer on the table. If the players reject the owners’ offer, well, it likely becomes chaos. And all we’ll know is there will be less than 72 games.