Tag: NBA draft deadline

Arizona v Duke

Who cares about the players? NCAA kills testing draft waters.


I thought colleges were about helping students with guidance and some expertise when making life-changing decisions.

But not if your college basketball player.

The NCAA approved a ridiculous rule that moves the deadline day for a college player to declare for the draft up to the day before the spring National Letter of Intent signing period. This year that would have been April 12. One week after the national championship game.

So good luck college baller, you have eight days to gather information, talk to reliable sources and find out whether you should pull out of college and enter the NBA draft or not. Biggest decision of your life. But be sure to rush it.

Who this benefits is coaches, who learn earlier who they need to replace. It also benefits universities and their free labor sources.

Before you start making the “they are getting a free education” argument, we are not talking about 95 percent of college basketball players here. For the vast majority of guys playing college basketball, going on to the NBA is not really an option (a dream, sure, but not a reality). For them, they are staying in school and getting their education (hopefully, but that’s another issue).

But the 100 or so top players — the best players at their schools, the guys the universities make the most money on in terms of ticket sales, jersey sales and more — whether or not to declare for the draft is a huge decision. Frankly, it’s a much easier decision if you are Kyrie Irving or someone who every legitimate source says is a top pick or near it.

But for the guy who has some people around him saying he’s a lottery pick while others are saying he might not get drafted, the guy getting pressured by people at the university to stay, some time to work out for and talk to NBA scouts and front office people and get an honest assessment is key. It’s the difference in making a smart informed decision or leaving a college student to guess at his future.

We thought that colleges were about helping students make educated decisions. But not the NCAA, not when its own self-interests are involved.